blessingAs I perused the back catalog of Wednesday WTF features, I realized one thing: WTF must sometimes mean Wonderfully Thrilling Features, because there have been some very nice homes indeed. And this week’s WTF is one of those — a space that with a little work could be a real, shall we say, blessing.

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church

Finegold Alexander Architects turned this 18th-century church into a 30-unit condo development that marries the modern and the historic (photo courtesy Finegold Alexander Architects).

It all started in a Facebook group: Someone asked about the status of the now-dormant Oak Cliff United Methodist Church in a group devoted to Dallas history.

“Anybody know what’s going on with this place?” the group member asked. “I’ve been driving by it daily on the way to my school and just watching it deteriorate daily. So sad. They can’t tear it down, thankfully.”

Several people commented on deterioration, including one person who shared photos of broken windows and an interior that is exposed to the elements. Another noted that it appeared as if the building was in the process of being boarded up. (more…)

chapelThis week’s historical shelter takes us to the village of North Lopham, Norfolk, England, where a Methodist chapel built in 1826 shows us that you can never, ever, judge a book by its cover.

The former chapel that once contained three bays, is now an open floor plan sitting on a little more than a half acre of land. And as you know, we’re suckers for a good church conversion. (more…)

Every Sunday for a year, we’ve looked at some incredible historical shelters, but this week we hop the pond to England to take in a stunning church conversion.

Listed by Mount and Minster, this church is located in the village of Cold Hanworth, and was built in 1861. Originally All Saints Church, it was built by J Croft of Islington for Commodore Peter Cracroft, and also served as a memorial for his late father. (more…)