midcentury

It is no secret that midcentury modern homes fetch more eyeballs, interest and buyers these days. Discriminating lovers of well-maintained and lovingly updated midcentury moderns are familiar with the name William E. Benson — his name became synonymous with significant Dallas architecture in the fifties and sixties. Truthfully, owning a home with a William  E. Benson signature would be a coup in any city.

Benson, who graduated from the University of Illinois in 1947 after a year of graduate work in design, moved to Dallas and hung up his shingle in 1952, quickly making a name for himself. Another home designed by Benson, in collaboration with interior designer Louise Kahn, is 5848 Colhurst. The home is well known as one of the most significant midcentury modern homes in Dallas.

Congruently, during a period of rapid church expansion, Benson designed nearly fifty church projects, from master plans and first units to complete sanctuaries.

And now, the luck of market is upon us. A Bishop Arts District abode Benson designed — 524 N. Manus Drive — has just been listed with Suzanne Warner of Coldwell Banker Global Luxury. Even more, the home has been updated to perfection with a serious effort to maintain Benson’s original midcentury modern aesthetic. Built in 1952, 524 N. Manus Drive home was constructed by a Dallas custom builder who hired personally Benson to design his own private home.

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This is about to become a common sight in our beloved Bishop Arts District neighborhood. In fact this sight is just off Bishop, across from the Laughing Willow. There are demo’d vacant lots in the middle of neighborhoods all over North Oak Cliff’s most popular entertainment district. I’ve found three new ones within the last week. Here’s the skinny on the last 10 projects under construction now, for a grand total of 27 individual projects.

“How did this happen?” you might ask. Perhaps it was the local option election that made North Oak Cliff “wet” in 2010? Or the nearby Trinity Groves’ explosion into Dallas’ culinary scene? Or Bishop Arts’ own explosion onto the ‘great neighborhood’ scene? Maybe the Bishop/Davis Rezoning Plan in 2010 or the Oak Cliff Gateway zoning changes in 2014 (and then updated in 2015)? Or did it all start in 2002 with the Bishop Street reconstruction? Maybe it’s a bit of all of this — and great neighbors who throw great, big annual events. For sure, that.

Your favorite restaurants and shops need your support more than ever before — with all the construction, sales are down about 30 percent across the board.  Seventeen (and counting) separate construction sites are underway within a half-mile of the district! From now on you need to make weekly trips — to gauge progress on these, have a bite to eat, and find something you can’t live without. There are some GREAT new shops opening too — ALL owned by Dallas and Oak Cliff locals. Legit.

Click to enlarge

In Part 1 we covered the big development projects under construction immediately around the Bishop Arts District (projects numbered 1-8 on the map.) Part 2 covered the projects mostly west of Bishop Arts (projects 9-16.) Here are projects numbered 17-26 below. (Yes! 26! Though more like 28 actually….) Note that project numbers correspond to the map above.

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A new familiar sight in North Oak Cliff.

In the first part of this overview we covered the big development projects under construction immediately around the Bishop Arts District (projects numbered 1-8 on the map below.) Driving through the neighborhood, it’s unbelievable how much construction is occurring simultaneously. Over $330 million according to my calculations. Not to mention all the road work and utility work: the extension of parallel parking further south on Bishop Ave has wrapped up, Adams Street has been widened, Melba and Madison will get a facelift as soon as the utility work is complete, and Jefferson’s having new brick crosswalks and beautified medians constructed.

Real Estate projects under construction or in development in North Oak Cliff.

The road reconstruction in North Oak Cliff isn’t over yet though: soon the Tyler-Polk Two-Way conversion will be under construction (planned completion in 2019) and a “complete streets” redesign of Davis Street was on the agenda in 2014 when the City Design Studio completed a thoroughfare study. Who knows when that will get funded. Hopefully not for a while — we’re all getting a bit of construction-fatigue.

Here’s the skinny on the development projects sprinkled all over the North Oak Cliff neighborhood, in various phases of development. Note the project numbers corresponding to the map above.

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Davis St looking west to N. Zang Blvd. from the CVS sidewalk.

If it’s been a few months since you last drove through the Davis/Zang intersection near the Bishop Arts District, you likely wouldn’t recognize where you are now. Buildings five stories tall are going up on three of the four corners, and a new CVS stands where El Corazón was. Melba St., on the other side of the district, is beginning to feel like the State Thomas neighborhood of Uptown: mid-rise apartments and town homes on all sides with a small historic home here or there.

Not only are the streets torn up from increasing utility sizes to accommodate the growth and reconstructing complete streets, but there are about 20 large-scale residential and commercial projects currently under construction in North Oak Cliff, totaling more than a quarter of a billion dollars of investment and adding more than 1,200 units.

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This morning’s panel discussion on Oak Cliff: Challenges + Opportunities for the Urban Neighborhood was a strikingly honest — almost uncomfortably honest — conversation, both between the panelists and in the Q&A. The panel brought together two well-established Oak Cliff developers — David Spence of Good Space and Monte Anderson of Options Real Estate — and two newer developers — Michael Nazerian of Exxir Capital and Wade Johns of Alamo Manhattan. The DFW REimagined breakfast seminar was hosted by one of Munsch, Hardt, Kopf, & Harr’s recent additions to their law team, Angela Hunt, who is overseeing zoning and development regulations.

Conversation cues were well-curated. We learned of Anderson’s “gentle-fication” process, Nazerian’s pivotal “ah-ha!” moment in the West Village, and the stark contrast in development processes Johns has experienced in Seattle and Portland versus Dallas.

They all seemed to agree that “Developers create the canvas for people to bring the place alive,” as Nazerian put it. And that even developers with good intentions can get “pushed around by the market,” Anderson said.

The agreement began to unravel when Hunt started asking about gentrification, which resulted in one of the most educated discussions on this topic as I’ve ever heard. Many who think of developing in Oak Cliff imagine the pushback from engaged citizen activists, such as those who attended the first community meeting with Alamo Manhattan in the Second story of Eno’s years ago.

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Kessler Park Tudor

If you’re in the market for a Kessler Park Tudor with a backyard that has no less than five areas for entertaining, stop reading and call Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s listing agent Jenni Stolarski immediately. This is one hot property, and mark my words — it will be pending by next week.

It’s always a challenge to bring you move-in ready properties, especially under a million dollars. And when we find them, they go fast.

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Bishop Arts 7th St House12

Source: Google Maps, Jan 2016

The landscape of  the Bishop Arts District is changing quickly — tiny historic Craftsman homes by the dozens are being razed for apartment complexes, half-million dollar condos, and five-story mixed-use developments going up. One developer, once demonized by the community for their rudimentary design out of the gate, just won major Brownie points with the help of Rogers Jr. House Moving.

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Exxir - Bishop Arts - Interior

Rendering of interior plazas of the Bishop Arts Village project   (Source bishoparts.com)

Update 12/16/16 from yesterday’s Plan Commission meeting: after much conversation, commissioners voted to hold the motion until the January 19th meeting. Neighbors will be meeting with Rob Baldwin, the developer’s zoning rep after the New Year to clarify recent changes to the zoning amendment request.

Arts Village, LLC (aka Exxir Capital, aka the Nazarian family) will be going before the Dallas City Plan Commission Board this week to amend the zoning for Planned Development District No. 830, just south of the Bishop Arts District in North Oak Cliff.

Nazerian Subdistrict Map

In September, I reported on this zoning change request, and since then the developers have held at least one community meeting. Yet they failed to include two of the most important requests I heard at that meeting:

1) To word the 15,000-square-foot market use to prohibit one singular tenant, and …

2) To limit hotel and entertainment uses to the portion of the 11 acre site south of 9th Street, where these uses are currently planned to be built — away from the residential neighborhood north of 9th and surrounding the development site.

We must remember that in this PD, zoning change requests are not subject to a specific development plan. Once uses are allowed by right in an area, plans can change, even owners can change. And although the Nazerians have proven to have great ideas for this development, these changes effect the land use allowances for the indefinite future, regardless of who the owner is.

At Thursday’s meeting, their zoning request will include the changes listed below, to be applicable within this one new subdistrict which will cover the entire 11 acre site resting between Melba Street, Madison Street, 10th Street, and Bishop Ave.

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