Recent studies show more interest in suburban living over urban.

For years we have been hearing that it’s all about urbanization: everyone is moving into the city core, desiring higher density housing like apartments and condos, Millennials and Baby Boomers alike. The high life! 

Certainly if you are leading or running a large city like Dallas, the chart to the right might want to make you slug Scotch. Dallas, as in City of Dallas, is losing population just as San Francisco, New York, and Chicago are.

Why? Why is Dallas, smack in the center of business-friendly Texas, with average home prices up but still not out of reach, on this death-spiraling list?

Dallas Isn’t Immune

We know that the over-priced real estate market in San Francisco — average home price is about $1 million — plus the homeless and constricting building laws (hello, it’s California) is starting to rub on even the most faithful Bay-area residents. 

Chicago, my beloved hometown: overpriced real estate, crime, so much corruption I almost cannot remember when we didn’t have a governor who went to jail. 

New York City: My favorite place on earth for a week, but who can afford to live there without a bottom income of $200K annually?

But why Dallas? My take — and I’d love to hear yours — is past weak leadership and corruption that weakened our police force, a reputation for poor public schools that is not at all deserved, and crime. Couple that with relatively cheap gas prices that make the extra five to 10 miles of commute more manageable, more people working remotely, and more jobs actually in the suburbs, Dallas is toast:

The new census statistics provide estimates for city populations annually between 2010 and 2018. They show that the average annual growth for the nation’s 87 cities with populations over a quarter million have slipped to 0.69% in 2017-2018—down from 0.76% the previous year, and from 1.21% in 2011-2012, the highest average growth since the Great Recession. Among the 87 largest metros, 66 exhibited lower growth in the last year than in 2011-2012. Among the 87 largest metros, 66 exhibited lower growth in the last year than in 2011-2012 (download Table A).

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Ready to move to Plano for the amazing schools? You should consider this listing from Vivo Realtor Bonnie Ottosen.

Ready to move to Plano for the amazing schools? You should consider this listing at 7209 Fair Valley Way from Vivo Realtor Bonnie Ottosen.

Of course a Collin County town made Movoto’s list of top 10 suburbs for schools. But Plano? I was betting on Frisco, Allen, or McKinney for that, but good ol’ Plano was the only suburb in Collin County — and in Texas, for that matter — in the top 10. The next highest ranking Texas town was Cedar Park at 14, followed by League city at 16 and Round Rock at 17. You can read the full list here.

You’re probably wondering about what makes Plano so great for education. Me, too. Plano was measured against its peer towns by student-teacher ratio, money spent per year per student, high school graduation rate, and GreatSchools.org rating (which is sometimes off-based). Here’s what Movoto said:

If you’re surprised to see Plano, TX on our list, well, you must not live here. Locals know that this Dallas suburb receives high marks pretty much across the board—it’s affluent, safe, and,according to these numbers, an all-star student.

Not only did Plano have one of the lowest student-teacher ratios of 14 to 1, but it also had a high school graduation rate of 94 percent and some of the highest test scores in the nation.

Well, well, well. Congrats, Plano. What do you think of the ranking?

The 10 Best Suburbs For Education By Movoto Real Estate