Whiffletree Plano home

Custom touches are plentiful in this 1997 contemporary Plano Whiffletree home with four bedrooms, four baths, and 3,700 square feet for $569,000.

Plano’s popular Whiffletree neighborhood has the perfect blend of well-built 1980s and 1990s homes, mature landscaping, and some of the best schools in highly-rated Plano ISD. For our continuing series on great homes located within great school zones, here is a contemporary two-story, nearly 3,700-square-foot, four-bedroom home for $569,000.

This home, located at 3617 Snidow Drive, is zoned for Plano ISD’s Mathews Elementary (rated 10 of 10), Schimelpfenig Middle School (rated 9 of 10), Clark High School (4 of 10), and Plano Senior High (9 of 10). It’s listed (and owned) by Cyndi Schrob of Redfin Corporation.

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Plano Collinwood House

Plano’s oldest home may move as soon as next month.

The Plano Collinwood House could move as soon as September to its new preservation spot as the new owners make plans for the 19th century home.

And while very preliminary, those plans could include mixed-use development along the Dallas North Tollway with retail, high-density housing, and the Collinwood House as its unique centerpiece, Clint Haggard tells CandysDirt.com.

“Our goal would be to incorporate that historic home into this future, unknown development,” Haggard says. “We don’t know if we’ll incorporate the home into green space or retail. But it’ll be something unique to create that development with a piece of our family history and heritage in the center of it.”

Clint Haggard with his father Rutledge Haggard, aunt Linda Haggard Brookshire, and cousin Jeff Lamun at the Collinwood House.

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Frisco ISD, Plano

4409 Benton Elm Drive in Plano, a 3,700-square-foot, four-bedroom for under $500k, is the first in a series featuring great homes located in great school districts like Frisco ISD.

There are two very good reasons why you’d want to purchase a home in this far north Plano neighborhood. No. 1, you’re looking at Plano addresses because you want something a little more established with trees that actually provide shade. And, No. 2, you want your kids to attend one of the best elementary and middle schools in one of the best school districts in North Texas, Frisco ISD.

This two-story, 3,713-square-foot home has the perks of an already-established neighborhood with the modern architecture of a late-model home and fantastic schools to boot. Located in far north Plano, just south of Sam Rayburn Tollway at Coit Road, this home would be great for a growing family looking to attend school in the highly-rated Frisco ISD. This 1991-built property at 4409 Benton Elm Drive is listed at $459,500 by John Harper of Dave Perry-Miller InTown

Start with the landscaped front yard and two well-established trees perfect for climbing and make your way into the spacious tiled entry that features arched doorways and high ceilings and dining room with crown molding details and laminate wood floors.

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Financial site WalletHub ranked 182 of the largest U.S. cities to find the most stressful places in America, and found that Plano is the least stressed city in Texas. Houston was ranked the most stressful city in the state. Oh, and the sky is blue. These are things we already knew.

Based on data, WalletHub found the three most stressful cities in the U.S. were Detroit, Newark, and Cleveland. What makes a city stressful? Citywide factors you’d expect such as high rates of unemployment and underemployment, long commute times, and lack of affordable housing. There’s more personal factors that cause stress like personal bankruptcy, foreclosure, poor health, and divorce.

Then, there are the quirky factors that WalletHub evaluates like percentage of binge drinkers (yes, that’s you with your box wine-a-weekend habit), median credit score, obesity rates and share of adults getting inadequate sleep that make writing about WalletHub’s lists so interesting.

People in Plano report lower levels of stress at work, less financial woes, happier families and better health and safety than any other city in Texas, according to the July 2018 study. The new ranking comes after Plano was named one of the happiest places in the United States.

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Clint Haggard with his father Rutledge Haggard, aunt Linda Haggard Brookshire, and cousin Jeff Lamun at the Collinwood House. Photo courtesy: Collinwood Consortium

Will the historic 1861 Collinwood house get a happy ending after all? Descendants of the Collinwood house’s original owners, the Haggard family, will save the city’s oldest home from demolition if a recently approved plan by the Plano City Council comes to fruition. The city council on Monday unanimously approved Haggard Enterprises’ bid to move Collinwood off the future site of a city park and take ownership of the troubled house that’s been on the verge of destruction.

The city will subsidize the Collinwood’s relocation, pitching in $250,000 in previously approved funds to move the home off the city’s property at the Dallas North Tollway and Windhaven Parkway, which is the future location of Windhaven Meadows park.

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Source: WalletHub

Today is the International Day of Happiness! Yes, that’s totally a thing. You feel it, right? While it may feel a bit more like summer here, the first day of spring does tend to put a little pep in our step. And to celebrate, we’re sharing with you the results of a national study that ranks one of our fair cities among the happiest in the land. According to WalletHub, that magical place is (drum roll)… Plano!

(Tell that to the folks fighting over the Plano Tomorrow Plan. Ahem.)

In a recent study, Plano, at number 19, is the only Texas city to break the top 20 happiest places to live in 2017. Dallas ranks number 86, which isn’t too shabby, either.

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Plano Tomorrow Plan

Following a year of court battles, the future of the Plano Tomorrow Plan remains unclear after an appellate court ruling last week. The fight centers on the city’s comprehensive, long-range land development plan and unhappy Plano citizens who feel their opinions on the matter went ignored. The plan, they say, describes a city completely unrecognizable to its long-time residents.

“The whole plan is terribly flawed,” said Ed Acklin, when asked about Plano Tomorrow. Acklin is running for Plano City Council Place 4 (Mayor Pro Tem Lissa Smith, whose term comes to an end this year, currently occupies the seat). “The city it describes is not — and never will be — Plano.”

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Collinwood house

All photos courtesy of Plano Magazine. Photos by Jennifer Shertzer.

We recently told you about the precarious situation of the historic Collinwood House. It is the oldest structure still standing in the city of Plano, and it faced demolition to make way for a recreational pavilion in a new park being built by the city.

But after a community-based campaign to save this historically significant house, Plano City Council says it will leave the decision up to voters in the May 2017 bond election.

At last week’s council meeting, they ditched an earlier ultimatum that gave friends of the Collinwood House until Aug. 5 to raise $1.5 million for restoration of the house, and to present a viable preservation plan.

The estimated $3.5 million it will take to restore the Collinwood House will be placed in the future bond election. Council also asked the Plano Heritage Commission to continue their research into the historic significance of the structure, and council agreed to secure the house by building a fence and installing an alarm.

“We were pleased to hear that the council decided to follow the direction recommended by the Heritage Commission, which entailed securing the house, putting the restoration costs on a bond election in 2017, and allowing research into the site and structure to continue,” said Candace Fountoulakis, a board member for Plano Conservancy for Historic Preservation. “Council members added to that with their statements about needing confirmation of the facts, staying focused on the Heritage Commission’s role, and refusing to agree to move the house if the bond election passed. We hope to inform Plano’s citizenry about the house so that they will know exactly how valuable the house truly is and what the costs of restoration will be, based on further research.”

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