Last, but definitely not least, on our list of Old East Dallas neighborhoods is Junius Heights. The neighborhood is the closest single-family-zoned neighborhood to downtown Dallas.  The area offers an eclectic mix of gorgeous historic architecture, spacious lot sizes, and lovely front porches.  All of the great entertainment districts of Dallas are easily accessible from the neighborhood, without being right in the middle of it all.  Zip codes included within Junius Heights are 75246, 75214, and 75204.

In addition to Junius Heights and the rest of Old East Dallas, the 75214 zip code alone encompasses Hollywood Heights and much of Lakewood, to the west side of White Rock Lake. An abundance of food and drink favorites in the area include establishments such as Cock and Bull, Craft Beer Cellar, The Heights, Meso Maya, and Garden Cafe.

According to the Junius Heights Neighborhood Association, the neighborhood was created in 1906, on what was then the Eastern edge of Dallas. During that time, the area was known by its large columns on Abrams and by the now-defunct Junius Heights streetcar service.

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The next area of the Old East Dallas neighborhood to be featured in our Neighborhood Spotlight is the ever-popular Munger Place. Comprised of over 250 households and the largest collection of Prairie-style homes in America, Munger Place has a lot to be proud of — past and present. (more…)

 

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Peak’s Suburban Addition in Old East Dallas is nestled conveniently between Deep Ellum and Lakewood. With over 500 homes, the neighborhood features architecture from the Queen Anne Victorian era, as well as Prairie, Craftsman, and modern or contemporary architecture styles. The diversity of homes, along with the diversity of the people, is what makes Peak’s Suburban Addition so unique and dynamic. (more…)

 

The English garden at 6005 Swiss is the stuff dreams are made of.

The English garden at 6005 Swiss is the stuff dreams are made of, but it’s not the only stunning home you’ll find in the Swiss Avenue Historic District.

It all began when successful real estate developer Robert S. Munger had a unique and forward-thinking vision. He came up with the idea of planning and building an upscale residential community near downtown Dallas. This first deed-restricted neighborhood in Texas included the exclusive and elegant parade of stately, beautifully grand homes along Swiss Avenue.

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6015 Bryan Parkway

This beautiful historic home at 6015 Bryan Pkwy. just hit the market. It’s located inside the Swiss Avenue Historic District, one of the many beautiful Old East Dallas neighborhoods.

Even being a long-time Dallas resident, you might not be familiar with the official lines of Old East Dallas, unless perhaps looking at homes in the area. Looking at the neighborhood’s past is like a fascinating history lesson! Four adjacent, amazing historic neighborhoods are all part of Old East DallasSwiss Avenue Historic District, Peak’s Suburban Addition, Munger Place, and Junius Heights.

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The Natural Grocers at Casa Linda Plaza was once home to a three-screen theater, one of the first to be integrated into a shopping center back in 1945. It closed in 1999, much to the chagrin of the neighborhood. 

East Dallas keeps on truckin’ up the list of the most popular parts of the city, and its neighborhood Casa Linda is no different. If you haven’t been around this little area of the land for awhile, you may be surprised at the growth and increasing coolness.

Fairly recently, the Casa Linda area has acquired new bars, restaurants, and shops. Goodfriend Package (an extension of the big guys across the street), 20 Feet Seafood Joint, Steel City Pops, and Savor Patisserie (for macaroons) are among the newbies.   (more…)

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It’s not over, but once again a neighborhood is squawking about the same things we hear so often with re-zoning and new development I should really create and market a NIMBY PACKET:

Logo: Name of development with a red line slashed through it. Put on yard signs and plant them in every yard all over North Dallas. Create buttons to wear on baseball caps, lapels, etc.

Premium package: bumper stickers.

Methodology: mass quantities of email communication, calls to local bloggers and reporters (good luck there!), call City Councilwoman every day, fill busses to plan committee and City Council hearings. Take friends to all meetings (offer to drive them) and stay for at least 1 hour, loud applause, louder boos.

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Zip Code 75235

West Love: Inwood, Harry Hines and Denton Drive

Let’s get our noses out of house porn for a minute to wander through an up and coming neighborhood. DCAD calls it Lovedale 2 (or unappetizingly Slaughters Brookdale), but as far as I know, it has no fancy name to woo buyers to its hipness. It’s pre-hip. If other hip locales cool, maybe this area becomes a hip replacement (boooo, bad pun, bad Jon).

I’ll call it West Love Field or West Love … hmmm, I like that … West Love … and homes are selling FAST! In the hours it took to write this, two of the properties featured below went under contract.

East of Love Field has been in full-on gentrification mode for a while now, only pausing for the recession (as did we all), but West Love hasn’t really gotten any lovin’. It’s loosely bounded by Denton Drive, Harry Hines and Inwood. There are plenty of warehouses on Denton Drive, but there are also a lot of smaller cute starter homes that are a hop from downtown, UTSW and the monkeyshines of the Gayborhood … oh, and Love Field. Perfect for medical folks or air mattresses, trolley dollies in-flight personnel.

Speaking of the airport … I said, SPEAKING OF THE AIRPORT … Oaklawnians have lived cheek by jowl with Love Field since the beginning (well, since 1917 when it opened as an army pilot training facility). The “Oaklawn Pause” is what happens when a plane flies over during a conversation; it pauses. Homes east and west of Love Field are somewhat better off. Planes take-off and land from the north-south, meaning these east and west areas are not being directly flown over – but what a cool place for a roof deck.

For many years when homes hit the market, they were in somewhat calamitous condition. That’s changing, but things are still wonderfully affordable here and sure to rise. How wonderfully affordable? Try $125,000 to $135,000 for 1,100 to 2,031 square feet, many on pretty sizeable lots 50-foot lots!

Here’s a smattering of what’s available and going gone fast.

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