Bridge Hollow Residence (Photo: SHM Architects)

If you’ve been looking for an event where you can hold a cocktail in one hand, mini quiche in another, and listen to some of the best modern designers in Dallas talk about some of the best modern homes — first of all, that’s oddly specific and second of all, The Dallas Architecture Forum’s got you. It’s time for their 365 Modern Living Cocktail Series beginning Tuesday, May 21, from 6 to 8 p.m. Three evenings, three houses, and three opportunities to discreetly wipe the drool from your lower lip.

This year’s theme is “I want that.”

JK. It’s Modern Living Every Day of the Year. And we should all live modernly all year long.

If you’re saying to yourself, “CandysDirt.com, should I attend these evenings?” The short answer is yes and the long answer is heck yes.

P.S. This majestic series sold out last year, so get on it if you love clean design, thoughtful architecture, own cocktail attire, are a bubbly conversationalist, or if you have ears. 

“Ears?”

Yes, ears.

Each evening there will be a short presentation from the actual designers of the homes. Which is even more exciting than you’re imagining right now. The creativity and attention to detail that goes into every inch of these homes will inspire you and open your mind to possibilities you never dreamed of. Maybe you’ll apply them to your own home or maybe you’ll just worship at the altar of what’s in front of you, either way, this year’s line-up is a can’t miss.

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Begun in 1979 by the Hyatt Hotels’ founding Pritzker family, the Pritzker Prize in architecture is considered to be the Nobel Prize for architects – in fact, if you Google “Nobel Prize architecture,” the Pritzker Prize is the first result.  The prize is awarded annually for a body of work versus a single building. The first winner was Crescent Court architect Philip Johnson.

The 2019 winner is 87-year-old Japanese architect Arata Isozaki who was quoted as being “overjoyed,” adding with an impish grin, “it’s like a crown on a tombstone.”  Isozaki grew up in post-war Japan where much of its buildings had been lost to war. His early career rode a second wave of rebuilding.

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Dallas designer, Lee Lormand, is a master at creating clean and timeless interiors like the one pictured here, and will be featured in the second Dallas Architecture Forum spring panel discussion on Mar. 5.

Staff Reports

Gear up for the spring season with inspiration from Dallas’ leading architects, designers, and landscape architects at the Dallas Architecture Forum spring 2019 panel discussion! The Dallas Architecture Forum, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing public education about architecture, design and the urban environment, continues its Spring 2019 Panel Discussion Series on Tuesday, March 5, 2019 with “Design Inspirations Part Two,” moderated by Meg Fitzpatrick, President of MMF Strategies.

“Dallas and North Texas are known for award-winning projects – residences and public buildings, interiors and landscapes. With this panel The Forum will continue its exploration of what motivates and inspires some of our area’s outstanding design professionals to create their highly regarded projects,” stated Forum Executive Director Nate Eudaly. “These design leaders will highlight some of their amazing projects, and there will be time for those attending to ask our esteemed panelists more about their work.”

Panels are free for both Forum members and the general public as a public outreach of The Forum. The discussion begins at 6:30 pm, with complimentary beverages available beginning at 6:15 pm. No reservations are needed to attend. As a bonus, one CEU AIA credit is available.

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Thomas Woltz and his firm, NBW, is designing the urban green space in New York City’s Hudson Yards project.

When Dallas thinks about public green space, the first thought that bubbles up is our scarcity of it. Sure, we’ve tried to bring more public spaces to our urban core with great, though expensive, outcomes. With a city whose built environment weighs heavily on the side of car culture, how do you add green space that adds value to pedestrian and commuter, alike? It’s a problem that renowned landscape architect Thomas Woltz has puzzled through, again and again. CandysDirt.com was afforded the unique opportunity to get Woltz’s perspective ahead of his 7 p.m. lecture with the Dallas Architecture Forum at the Dallas Museum of Art’s Horchow Auditorium.

Tickets for this lecture are $20 for general admission, $15 for DMA members, and $5 for students (with ID). Tickets can be purchased at the door before the lecture. No reservations are needed to attend Forum lectures. Dallas Architecture Forum members receive free admission to all regular Forum lectures as a benefit of membership, and AIA members can earn one hour of CE credit for each lecture. For more information on The Dallas Architecture Forum, visit www.dallasarchitectureforum.org or call 214-764-2406.

Thomas Woltz

As principal of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects (NBW), a 45-person firm based in Charlottesville, Virginia and New York City, Woltz has infused narratives of the land into the places where people live, work and play, deepening the public’s enjoyment of the natural world and inspiring environmental stewardship. NBW projects create models of biodiversity and sustainable agriculture within areas of damaged ecological infrastructure and working farmland, yielding hundreds of acres of reconstructed wetlands, reforested land, native meadows and flourishing wildlife habitat.

Presently, Thomas and NBW are entrusted with the design of major public parks across the United States, Canada and New Zealand. These projects include Memorial Park in Houston, Hudson Yards in New York City, NoMA Green in Washington DC, Cornwall Park in Auckland, the Aga Khan Garden in Alberta, Canada, and three parks in Nashville, including Centennial Park.

Centennial Park, Nashville, Tennessee

“Thomas Woltz has the unusual distinction of a being a landscape architect who has designed residential, corporate and public projects. He brings a unique approach to landscape design by pursuing thorough research to understand the ecology and history of an area as the basis for the design,” stated Forum executive director Nate Eudaly. “Because his goal is to move beyond just decorating the environment to improving the underlying eco-system and bringing forth the history of an area to create an identity that draws people from various backgrounds, he has been called a visionary and has attracted wide acclaim for his work.”

Woltz will speak today, Feb. 6 at 7 p.m., with check-in and a complimentary reception beginning at 6:15 p.m., at the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Keep reading for our exclusive Q&A with the visionary landscape architect:

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Amangiri Resort & Spa, Kane County, Utah. (Photo Courtesy of the Architect)

Rick Joy

Rick Joy, founder of Rick Joy Architects (Studio Rick Joy), will speak at the Dallas Architecture Forum‘s Second Annual Frank Welch Memorial Lecture at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 23, in the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art. Joy’s renowned Tucson, Arizona, firm is recognized for sensitive, thoughtful approaches to site, observation, process, landscape, and building, with projects ranging from trend-setting single-family homes to large-scale resort projects throughout the globe. 

Joy’s designs offer a striking parallel to Frank Welch‘s body of work. Welch, who died in 2017, worked under the tutelage of the legendary O’Neil Ford and was considered one of the most recognizable and prolific among Texas Modernist architects. Dallas is home to a significant number of Frank Welch designs, which painstakingly incorporate the natural surrounding elements to create a harmony between site and structure. Many of these homes have hosted Dallas Architecture Forum events. 

“All of our studio’s work is rooted in developing an understanding of a ‘place’ and how the house design will be integrated in harmony to its surroundings,” Joy told CandysDirt.com. “We investigate the ‘culture’ of other well-designed buildings in the area, and use that as a basis to develop a design appropriate to the natural environment of that site.”

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Dallas design doyenne Emily Summers, the master behind this gorgeous room, will be featured in the first Dallas Architecture Forum spring  panel discussion on Jan. 17. (Photo: Eric Piasecki)

Staff Reports

Learn from Dallas’ leading architects, designers, and landscape architects about what inspires their design at the first Dallas Architecture Forum spring 2019 panel discussion. The Dallas Architecture Forum, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing public education about architecture, design, and the urban environment, begins its series on Thursday, Jan. 17, with “Design Inspirations Part One,” moderated by Eurico Francisco, Design Principal at HDR Architecture.

“Dallas and North Texas are known for award-winning projects – residences and public buildings, interiors and landscapes. With this panel the Forum will continue its exploration of what motivates and inspires some of our area’s outstanding design professionals to create their highly regarded projects,” stated Forum executive director Nate Eudaly. “These design leaders will highlight some of their amazing projects, and there will be time for those attending to ask our esteemed panelists more about their work.” 

Panels are free for both Forum members and the general public. The first discussion, which will be located at the Dallas Black Dance Theater at 2700 Ann Williams Way in the Dallas Arts District, begins at 6:30 p.m., with complimentary beverages available beginning at 6:15 p.m. No reservations are needed to attend, and one CEU AIA credit is available. 

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The AD EX — formerly the Dallas Center for Architecture — launched its new digs at Republic Center to go with its new name Dec. 8. (Photo: Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA)

There’s a new spot for your architecture and design fix in downtown Dallas from a source you’ll recognize. The AD EX — formerly the Dallas Center for Architecture and short for The Architecture and Design Exchange — had its official launch on Saturday, Dec. 8. The organization held the celebration with Downtown Dallas Inc. and the Better Block Foundation in its new digs located at Republic Center, which is near Thanks-Giving Square. Even with the new name and location, the Ad Ex will have the same great programming, including diverse exhibits, weekly free Lunch Learning Sessions, and guided architecture tours.

If you’re already intrigued, you can stop by between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, with late and weekend hours of 8 p.m. Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays.

Photo: Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA

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Proposed Oakland A’s stadium. Source: Bjarke Ingels Group

I was in Silicon Valley last week while plans for the new Oakland A’s ballpark were revealed. Between the numbers and images flying around, I got to thinking about Rangers’ stadium taking shape in Arlington.

I’ll stop right here and say that the last baseball game I attended was a Chicago Cubs’ game (against lord knows who) in the late 1980s (I was a plus-one good friend). I’ve never cared for sports or the foam-fingered, face-painted, booze-sopped civic pride they engender.  So please don’t take this column as some sort of shot at baseball – this is about creating useful architecture.

First, it’s interesting that the in-person audience for professional baseball appears to be shrinking. Ranger’s Stadium is slimming from 48,114 seats to an estimated ~42,000. The Oakland A’s are also proposing a smaller, 34,000-seat stadium – their current digs seat 63,000 and were shared with the departing Oakland Raiders.

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