Architect Larry E. Boerder Includes Unique Details in This University Park Stockbroker Tudor

Stockbroker Tudor

In the 1920s, architects educated in Europe brought the Tudor look to the East Coast. These grand homes were known as Stockbroker Tudors because the financially successful clients they were constructed for had made their fortunes in the stock market. If you built a Stockbroker Tudor, you were making a statement about not only your stability and wealth but also your sophistication and taste.

When I spotted this gorgeous example of Tudor architecture at 3545 Hanover Street, listed with Jonathan Rosen of The Collective Residential for $3.95 million, I was sure it was original. The steeply pitched roof, embellished doorway, and the second story with stucco and decorative half-timbering are the distinctive hallmarks of a 1920s Tudor.

“That’s exactly what we wanted you to think,” architect Larry E. Boerder said. “That was our goal all along, and most people do think it was built in the 1920s, not in 2006.”

“I had just finished working on John and Lyn Muse’s house with British architect Quinlan Terry,” Boerder said. (If you are in the architectural loop, this is the Quinlan of the famed Quinlan & Francis Terry Architects who work with the royal family.) “Working with him on that house changed my level of detail. So, when this  University Park Stockbroker Tudor project came along, we detailed the daylights out of it. We had a client ready, willing, and able for us to do it right. And you don’t always get that.”

Boerder did a lot of research for this house, traveling to see Stockbroker Tudors in Philadelphia, and Tuxedo, New York, before planning the 6,084-square-foot home with George Lewis Custom Homes.

“We like to go to the original source rather than copying local architecture,” Boerder said.  The barley twist embellishment on the gable, for instance, is not something you see in Dallas. Boerder had seen it years earlier and was excited to use the detail

The barley twist embellishment on the gable, for instance, is not something you see in Dallas. Boerder had seen it years earlier and was excited to use the unique detail on this house.

The entry has three-quarter Tudor paneling made from quarter-sawn oak. Historically this type of paneling style was used so paintings could hang on the flat wall above it. Although the entry was updated with white paint, the timeless architecture creates an embracing warmth.

It’s a well-thought-out home with the traditional layout of public rooms on the first floor and private on the second. The formals open off the entry, and the family room is straight ahead with a view of the pool. There are four bedrooms, five bathrooms, and two powder baths.

Stockbroker Tudor

Stockbroker Tudor

Stockbroker Tudor

Stockbroker Tudor

Stockbroker Tudor

The decorative plaster Jacobean ceiling style was popular in the 1920s.

Stockbroker Tudor

Stockbroker Tudor

Stockbroker Tudor

The backyard includes a large extended patio, a saltwater pool, and spa, and artificial turf.

“The sight lines are lovely in this home,” Boerder said. “It’s not a white box, and in 10 years, it will still be in vogue.”

Boerder is right. A Stockbroker Tudor is timeless. They make the same statement of style, stability, and sophistication today that they made a century ago.

 

Karen Eubank is the owner of Eubank Staging and Design. She has been an award-winning professional home stager for more than 25 years. She’s been a professional writer for 20 years. Karen is the mother of a son who’s studying music at The University of Miami. An ardent animal lover, she doesn’t mind one bit if your fur baby jumps right into her lap. Find Karen at www.eubankstaging.com