Grab Your Mallet, as This Ash Bluff Mansion Has History of Horsing Around

23 Ash Bluff Front

Show of hands: How many of our CandysDirt.com readers enjoyed the beautiful weather at the annual Polo on the Lawn match this past Saturday? It was a wonderful event held at Prestonwood Polo Club in Oak Point, benefiting Children’s Miracle Network. But did you know that 23 Ash Bluff Lane was once the site of the Dallas Polo Club in the 1920s?

Yes, it’s true! This gorgeous Anton Korn-designed estate built in 1935 is the very same place where polo ponies and riders raced while the elegant ladies and gentleman of Dallas society looked on.

It was originally built for oilman Clint Murchison, but was later renovated in a way that holds on to the home’s history while allowing it to easily accommodate today’s buyer. Jump to see the rest of this gorgeous home located inside the exclusive Glen Abbey neighborhood.

23 Ash Bluff Side Front

From the front, the first thing you’ll notice is the long, graceful fountain dividing the driveway, shaded by the boughs of grad trees that surround it. The circular drive drops you at the front, where you’ll notice the beautiful facade and colonial architecture. Inside the front door is an entry foyer awash in harlequin marble from which you can see the solarium ahead and then the gardens, which Allie Beth Allman says are reminiscent of old France or England.

23 Ash Bluff Entry

23 Ash Bluff Foyer

23 Ash Bluff Sun room

Allman, who is listing this seven-bedroom, seven-full-and-two-half-bath estate for $6 million, wants you to note the original details that have been preserved in this tremendous historic property. The original Gracie Studio walls adorn the dining room, as well as the original hand moulding in the matching living room.

But in the kitchen you’ll see how the sellers have used traditional details and coveted upgrades to create a feeling of continuity throughout the home.

23 Ash Bluff Formal

23 Ash Bluff Drawing Room

The kitchen, with its exposed steel trussed framework and Carrara marble counters, is perfect for day-to-day living as well as catering and entertaining. Copious built-in cabinetry, as well as commercial grade appliances — a Viking stove with double oven, two additional built-in ovens, and a built-in Sub Zero French door refrigerator — make meals a snap. I do love the stainless steel accent tile behind the range, though a pot-filler would be a welcome addition. That said, there are two full-sized sinks and two separate islands for preparation, as well as plenty of room for a breakfast table, island seating, and a cozy window seat.

23 Ash Bluff Kitchen

23 Ash Bluff Kitchen 2

23 Ash Bluff Kitchen Breakfast

23 Ash Bluff Formal Dining

“The fabled trophy room, with its cross beamed ceiling and murals, recalls the gatherings of legends from business, sports, and entertainment,” Allman said. Can you imagine the conversations held in here? Put in some chairs from Anteks around that big fireplace and soak in the history from the warmth of a hearth that has hosted many of Dallas’ legends.

23 Ash Bluff Second Master

23 Ash Bluff Master Bath

23 Ash Bluff Master Laundry

23 Ash Bluff Master Tub

The master bedroom is an enormous 20 x 34 and has everything you’d imagine, including a coffee bar and en-suite laundry. It’s just filthy with built-in cabinetry, marble, an impressive fireplace, and warm hardwoods. Those of us who require a good soak at the end of the day, paired with a flute of bubbly, will appreciate the bathtub, which looks out onto a private water feature. I’m feeling more relaxed already.

23 Ash Bluff Library

23 Ash Bluff Home Theater

The 18,589-square-foot estate also includes a lovely home theater and a beautiful wood-paneled library. The grounds, which total 2.87 acres, are lush and perfectly manicured.

Second level room plans, around a cavernous central hall, are equally spacious, all with views of nature. And the third floor taps creativity for a myriad of uses. Here is one of Dallas’ legendary homes, superbly renovated for another era.

One Comment

  • Does anyone know why this has languished on the market for so many years? I suppose it’s a combination of the overwhelming size and the overwhelming price for the neighborhood? I’v been fascinated with this house for years and would love to get updated photos