UPDATED: First Human West Nile Virus Case is Found in Preston Hollow, City Plans Ground Spraying For Affected Area

Poorly maintained swimming pools like Councilwoman Vonciel Jones Hill's could become breeding grounds for West Nile Virus-spreading mosquitoes, which mature from an egg in as few as three days. (Photo: Eric Nicholson/Dallas Observer)

Poorly maintained swimming pools like Councilwoman Vonciel Jones Hill’s could become breeding grounds for West Nile Virus-spreading mosquitoes, which mature from an egg in as few as three days. (Photo: Eric Nicholson/Dallas Observer)

Well, you’ll find us on our way to Lake Tahoe, where there are no disease carrying mosquitoes and the vistas and waters are easy to soak up. (Well, Candy is headed there, and I’m with her in spirit, so that counts, right?) It was an easy decision now that Dallas County Health and Human Services has declared the first human case of West Nile Virus within the city limits. Not only that, but it was found in 75230, our beloved Preston Hollow area!

“The City’s protocol is to conduct targeted ground spraying in areas where WNV has been confirmed in mosquitoes, and in areas where trapping has indicated significant increases in the number of mosquitoes that have the potential to carry WNV,” said Dallas County HHS in a press release. “A mosquito pool in an existing trap near the human case tested positive for WNV. Therefore the City will expand the scheduled spray areas and place an additional trap near the location to gain information on mosquito activity.”

I wonder if they’re finding mosquitoes by the fistful outside cesspools like those found in Dallas City Councilwoman Vonciel Jones Hill’s backyard. We have one nearby in Casa View Haven, and despite frequent calls and complaints to 311 and Dallas City Code Compliance officers, the disgusting hogwallow in a concrete shell remains unabated. Drain your dang pools, people, or maintain them! Mosquitoes grow from egg to adult in as little as a week, so it’s important to take care of standing water ASAP.

Of course, the city is asking people to drain standing water (you know, like an unmaintained pool, for crissakes) after our recent rains, as well as limiting outdoor activity during the evenings and nighttime hours. If you’re out and about after sunset, plan on sweating through your long sleeves and pants, and wear that Deep Woods OFF! you reserve for camping trips.

And if you want your nearby code official to stop by within 1 to 2 weeks of reporting an issue, go ahead and call 3-1-1 to report standing water.

UPDATE FROM CITY HALL:

Areas in North Central Dallas are scheduled for mosquito control spraying Saturday andSunday night. Mosquitoes infected with West Nile Virus were found earlier this week near the 6600 block of Brookshire Drive in the 75230 zip code and the 7100 block of Valley View Lane in the 75240 zip code. Mosquito spraying did not occur July 14 through 17 due to weather conditions.

Additionally, the first human case of West Nile Virus in the City of Dallas was confirmed in the 75230 zip code near the radius of the Brookshire Drive location and therefore the ground spraying radius of Brookshire Drive will be expanded. Weather permitting; the areas delineated below are scheduled for mosquito control spraying between 9 p.m. and 5 a.m. Saturday July 19 and Sunday July 20.  

Control Areas: The areas to be sprayed are within an area generally bounded by:

The 6600 block of Brookshire Drive: Azalea Lane on the north, Tulane Boulevard on the west,Airline Road on the east and Walnut hill Lane on the south.

Expanded radius of Brookshire Drive: Woodthrush Drive on the north, Hillcrest Road on the west,North Central Expressway (75) on the east and Glenshannon Circle on the south.

7100 block of Valley View Lane: Elmridge Drive on the north, Ridgeview Circle on the west,Flagstone Lane on the east and Helsem Way on the south.

 While the insecticide is approved by the Environmental Protection Agency for treatment, residents in the above areas should avoid contact with the spray by staying indoors. Persons inside a vehicle while trucks are actively spraying should remain in their vehicles with the windows up and the air conditioner on until the trucks pass and the spray is no longer visible. Persons out during the scheduled spraying time should be alert for trucks and should not follow them. Residents who come in contact with the spray are advised to wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and water. The spray breaks down quickly in the presence of sunlight and has no residual effect.

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