Ditch The Fake Houseplants! Need to Green Up Your Living Space? Here Are Some Easy-to-Care-For Indoor Plants

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plantsIn offices and homes for sale, one of my biggest pet peeves is fake houseplants. I loathe them! Most fake plants look plastic-y and ridiculous, and serve zero function in a home. And considering that there are TONS of easy-to-care-for (read: hard-to-kill) houseplant varieties, there’s absolutely zero reason to use fake ones.

If you’re considering buying a fake ficus to add some green to a room, consider a real one instead! Want to add some depth and texture to a house? Consider a golden pothos vine! Not only do plants add to the look and feel of a room, but some studies show that bringing in a few plants can literally clear the air by filtering out formaldehyde and airborne pathogens!

Need some inspiration? Check out these photos from Houzz.com and find the perfect houseplant for your home today!

A golden pothos is a classic houseplant that is easy to care for and leaves beautiful trailing tendrils. In this photo, the ivy hangs in a bathroom window, adding the aspect of a privacy screen, too!

The little black dress of houseplants, snake plant goes with any decor, in any room, and can survive pretty much any living situation. It needs very little water, especially in winter, and can be divided into more plants.

Want to add some drama? There’s nothing more dramatic than a healthy indoor canopy of ficus trees. This houseplant is one of the most common office plants, and is widely faked. Don’t go plastic when you can get a real one that can decrease airborne pathogens by up to 30 percent!

Ferns are great indoor plants that don’t require too much care, but they’re not exactly my favorite. They can do without direct sunlight, but if you neglect them too much, they can shed a lot of leaves very quickly, resulting in a lot of debris on the floor. Still, they’re a great option for hanging containers or small planters.

Spider plants (also called airplane plants) are great for hanging containers. They have a really cool growth habit of popping down baby plants that give the effect of spiders hanging from a thread. Here is an example of a planter over a staircase landing, but you could get this same effect by hanging a plant from the ceiling near a staircase or in a corner.

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Joanna England

If Executive Editor Joanna England could house hunt forever, she absolutely would. Instead she covers the North Texas housing market and the economy for CandysDirt.com. While she started out with the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University, Joanna's work has appeared in The Dallas Morning News as well as several local media outlets. When she's not knitting or hooping, or enjoying White Rock Lake, she's behind the lens of her camera. She lives in East Dallas with her husband, son, and their furry and feathered menagerie.

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  1. mmCandy Evans says

    Well I just pitched a natural green houseplant yesterday because it was growing wild and spewing crud all over the place! I do not like fake plants either — just God awful — but natural plants get buggy and messy. So I tend to have only the bigger ones — like my giant Ficus that is now bigger than a grand piano!

  2. mmCandy Evans says

    Well I just pitched a natural green houseplant yesterday because it was growing wild and spewing crud all over the place! I do not like fake plants either — just God awful — but natural plants get buggy and messy. So I tend to have only the bigger ones — like my giant Ficus that is now bigger than a grand piano!

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