casa linda dallas homes for sale

It may get hotter than blue blazes during Dallas summers, but we have plenty of positively divine weather, too (stick your head outside today for proof—high of 74°!).

During these gorgeous days, outdoor space is a must. Today’s Tuesday Two Hundred, at 9206 Forest Hills Blvd., offers it in spades, with a secluded front courtyard and big backyard. This Casa Linda house sits on 0.33 acres, located near Buckner and Garland in East Dallas.

This is a 2-1 with 1,264 square feet, built in 1946. This is a modest-sized home, but with such a big yard, there’s plenty of room to add onto the house, if new homeowners desire.

It was listed Jan. 29 by Jenny Capritta with RE/MAX DFW Associates for $299,500.

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Arboretum Garage WFAA

 

(Photo: WFAA)

It was just a year ago that public outcry from neighborhoods surrounding the Dallas Arboretum put the kibosh on a parking lot planned for Winfrey Point. That project would have paved over a significant portion of the restored prairie and baseball fields inside one of White Rock Lake’s most popular areas.

It was protracted, dramatic, and thankfully short. It sent Arboretum officials back to the drawing board to formulate a parking plan that won’t impact neighborhoods, views, and traffic on Garland Road — a major East Dallas thoroughfare.

According to stories by The Dallas Morning News and WFAA, the 1,200-space garage is planned for a lot on Garland Road that the Arboretum already owns. It will be connected to the main property via an underground tunnel, allowing patrons to cross the busy three-lane road safely.

Of course, neighbors in Little Forest Hills, Forest Hills, and other nearby communities aren’t just going to stand idly by. While the Arboretum is on a deadline for new parking spaces thanks to getting the boot from Lincoln Properties, folks still plan on getting a very close look at the garage and its construction before giving it a nod of approval:

“We have a checkered history with the Arboretum; they haven’t always played on the up-and-up,” said neighbor Kelly Cotten. “I think it’s right to come to these meetings with some cautious suspicion.”

I think I remember someone suggesting this plan last year as an alternative to the Winfrey Point parking lot, but I could be mistaken. In any case, I hope Good Fulton & Farrell Architects are up to the task of working with some very ornery neighbors.

What do you think of the plan? Would you want to live next to a 1,200-space parking garage?

Arboretum Garage WFAA

 

(Photo: WFAA)

It was just a year ago that public outcry from neighborhoods surrounding the Dallas Arboretum put the kibosh on a parking lot planned for Winfrey Point. That project would have paved over a significant portion of the restored prairie and baseball fields inside one of White Rock Lake’s most popular areas.

It was protracted, dramatic, and thankfully short. It sent Arboretum officials back to the drawing board to formulate a parking plan that won’t impact neighborhoods, views, and traffic on Garland Road — a major East Dallas thoroughfare.

According to stories by The Dallas Morning News and WFAA, the 1,200-space garage is planned for a lot on Garland Road that the Arboretum already owns. It will be connected to the main property via an underground tunnel, allowing patrons to cross the busy three-lane road safely.

Of course, neighbors in Little Forest Hills, Forest Hills, and other nearby communities aren’t just going to stand idly by. While the Arboretum is on a deadline for new parking spaces thanks to getting the boot from Lincoln Properties, folks still plan on getting a very close look at the garage and its construction before giving it a nod of approval:

“We have a checkered history with the Arboretum; they haven’t always played on the up-and-up,” said neighbor Kelly Cotten. “I think it’s right to come to these meetings with some cautious suspicion.”

I think I remember someone suggesting this plan last year as an alternative to the Winfrey Point parking lot, but I could be mistaken. In any case, I hope Good Fulton & Farrell Architects are up to the task of working with some very ornery neighbors.

What do you think of the plan? Would you want to live next to a 1,200-space parking garage?


UPDATE: According to Eric Nicholson at the Dallas Observer, the Arboretum has changed course and won’t try to park cars at Winfrey Point.
That is, if the Dallas Arboretum has its way.

This weekend, a group of supporters carrying posters and wearing shirts saying “Help Save Winfrey Point” rallied outside the Dallas Arboretum, protesting the new parking facility planned for the area. Winfrey Point, an award-winning blackland prairie restoration and natural area, is a popular landmark at White Rock Lake. It’s home to a few tidy baseball diamonds, too.

But from now until November, it’ll be a parking lot. And after that, it could be a parking garage.

I bet you’re thinking Joni Mitchell was ahead of her time, amiright?

I am wondering how the folks who live in the Emerald Isle neighborhood as well as some of the nearby pricey apartments and condos think about having a ton of cars parked on Winfrey Point. That can’t be good for property values.

In the WFAA story, nearby residents sounded downright stunned by the news, saying that there was no public notice of the decision. One day, Winfrey Point was just another part of Dallas’ Crown Jewel — White Rock Lake — the next day the mowers were roaring and the wildflowers were shaking in their roots.

Now, the Arboretum, which just finished another overflow lot on Garland Road a couple of blocks away, says that because of the new Dave Chihuly exhibit and the addition of the new Children’s Garden, they need a place to park more cars, and Winfrey Point happens to be that spot. They also claim that all of those wildflowers and grasses aren’t native at all, and should’ve been mowed down anyway.

Fighting the Arboretum on the issue will be an uphill battle for residents and nature-lovers, that’s for sure.

Perhaps someone has already thought of this, but what happens when several less-than-well-maintained cars and trucks park out on the blackland prairie restoration area and leak oil and other toxic fluids into the soil before the parking structure is built? What about all the hard work the city put into restoring the area? And what about the brand-new baseball diamonds?

Is the city being short-sighted, or are the Arboretum’s neighbors being too sensitive? How will a multi-story parking structure change the landscape of White Rock Lake Park?

There seem to be a heck of a lot more questions than answers, that’ for sure.