Photo courtesy Dallas ISD

Pretty much immediately after former WFAA-reporter-cum-political-candidate Brett Shipp posted that it appeared Dallas ISD school board trustee Jaime Resendez didn’t live in his district, we started poking around, too.

Probably just like everyone else.

And the Dallas Morning News did a few stories. Shipp continuously tweets about it. And we continued to quietly try to figure out what in the Sam Hill was going on, and let me tell ya, if you read all those stories, it’s still confusing.

What we do know: Resendez moved out of his District 4 sometime in the late summer/early fall of 2017. According to the Dallas Central Appraisal District, the deed to the home on Mission Hills Lane, which is just a few blocks out of District 4, transferred to Resendez from the seller on Aug. 30, 2017.

He also did not claim a homestead exemption on the property. (more…)

HistoricNot every historic home in Dallas meets the wrecking ball — some are lovingly cared for, carefully updated, and enjoying third, fourth, and even fifth lives as new generations of Dallasites back up the moving truck and begin their lives there.

This week, we’d like to show you three open houses, all homes that are at least 75 years old or more, all updated and move in ready for their next family.

Every Thursday, we bring you our pick of the hottest North Texas properties in our CandysDirt.com Open Houses of the Week. Which one will you choose? (more…)

They got a few real estate numbers wrong, but what does it matter? It’s the New York Times, right, and they got the design story spot on. Check out this splendidly glowing write up on Emily and Steve Summer’s house (with a well-deserved plug for her forthcoming book, “Distinctly Modern Interiors,” ) in the “affluent Dallas suburb of Highland Park” which their daughter, real estate dynamo Caroline Summers, found for them about 20 years ago:

Twenty years ago, when her daughter, Caroline, a real estate agent, saw a listing for a low-slung 1962 house designed by the architect Robert Johnson Perry in the affluent Dallas suburb of Highland Park, Ms. Summers and her husband, Steve Summers, who worked in finance before retiring, decided they should have a look.

“Originally they said the house cost $1.3 to buy and $1.5 was the total remodeling project,” says Caroline, who works with Briggs-Freeman Sotheby’s. “They must have been talking to my dad!”

The actual sales price was $1.5 and the remodeling tab shot northward of $2.5. No biggie. (more…)

GreatSchools

W.T. White High has a 4/10 ranking from GreatSchools. We explain why that’s a problem.

Back away from the Realtor.com, guys. Scroll away from the school rankings on that adorable, completely updated cottage you’ve been loving from afar, but won’t go look at because of its GreatSchools rating, because we’re about to upend your faith in those numbers.

I’ve had this column in my back pocket, waiting to be written, since Candy hired me several years ago.  And I say this with all the love in my heart, but if you’ve been holding back on purchasing a home in this neighborhood or that neighborhood because the school ratings are low, you’re using less-than-complete data. (more…)

Casa ViewOur Tuesday Two Hundred, by definition of its price point, tends to be a showcase of starter homes — and this week’s updated Midcentury Ranch in Casa View is a great example of a starter home that can be quite long term.

So often, we hear the term starter home and assume it means that the buyer will be in it for a handful of years. But when you have a well-done remodel with a sensible garage conversion to increase the square footage of this 1957 home to a rare (for Casa View) 1,782 square feet, it becomes clear that this home has been remodeled with a family in mind. (more…)

schoolsRealtors, take note — there are four schools, in particular, you should know about as you go out today to sell homes in Dallas or Grand Prairie today.

We have the details, plus market reports, in this week’s roundup of real estate news. (more…)

  • SEC charges come two months after the Texas State Securities Board charged Christian Custom Homes CEO Phillip Carter with fraud
  • Agency alleges Carter and two co-conspirators defrauded more than 270 investors
  • Christian Custom Homes and several other companies owned by Carter are now under control of new manager

A little more than two months after the state of Texas charged Frisco-based Christian Custom Homes CEO Phillip Michael Carter with several fraud charges, the Security and Exchange Commission announced it too would charge him and two other alleged co-conspirators with fraud.

Phillip Carter, left; Shelley Carter, right.

In November, the Texas State Securities Board announced the indictments of Carter, and his wife, Shelley Noel Carter, on assorted state fraud charges stemming from alleged misuse of investor funds meant to go to real estate development ventures. Carter was also indicted in Collin County Court on charges stemming from the sale of fraudulent promissory notes, along with Richard Gregory Tilford of Arlington, who is alleged to have raised $6 million from investors. Carter’s wife, Shelley, was charged with money laundering and misapplying investor funds.

Bobby Eugene Guess

The state’s indictment against Carter alleges that he raised nearly $17.5 million from nearly 100 investors, primarily elderly Texans, for real estate development projects through Texas Cash Cow Investments Inc. and North Forty Development LLC.

One of Carter’s sales agents, Bobby Eugene Guess — had been served with a target letter from the U.S. Attorney’s Office informing him that he was under investigation for mail fraud, money laundering, and securities fraud, and in July he was sentenced to 12 years in state prison.

Guess, a former wealth manager, also hosted the radio program “Dollars & Sense” on WBAP.

The state charges for Tilford and both Carters remain pending.

The SEC Alleges ‘Multi-Million Dollar Offering Fraud’

The SEC’s announced it was charging Carter, Guess, and Tilford for conducting “multi-million dollar offering fraud.”

The agency alleged that the three raised almost $45 million from more than 270 investors across the country by selling short-term, high-yield promissory notes that were issued by shell companies that the SEC alleged were intentionally created to confuse investors. (more…)

pitchesAs we’ve mentioned before, every week we solicit pitches for our various featured listing posts, including our weekly roundup of open houses.

You can tag us on Instagram, or even better, you can join our Facebook group, Getting the Dirt.  It’s a great place to virtually mingle with fellow professionals, ask questions, lend a hand, and, yes, pitch stories to CandysDirt.com writers. Not a Realtor? It’s a great place to get a first glimpse at some of the most recent listings all over North Texas, too.

Take, for instance, this week’s properties featured in our CandysDirt.com Open Houses of the Week. We have four incredible properties this week — consider it our usual three and a bonus house, if you will.

Want to see who made a successful pitch? (more…)