recessionFrom staff reports

About two-thirds of homeowners who are still living the same house they were in 10 years ago when the Great Recession began have reported that their home is worth more now, a new Bankrate survey revealed.

The survey found that 23 percent said the value is about the same as it was in December 2007, while 11 percent said their home is worth less now.

Forty-six percent of homeowners said their property lost value from December 2007 to June 2009. More than 20 percent who reported that their home lost value during the Great Recession said the home never regained its pre-recession worth. One in 10 whose home value depreciated said they don’t want to own a home now, and 23 percent said they now have a more affordable home and/or mortgage. (more…)

recessionDallas was among nine metros where the bulk of home values have hit pre-recession levels, affordability is hampering one age group in particular from purchasing homes, Zillow is making yet another bid toward world domination, and mortgage rates are ticking up — all this and more in this week’s real estate news roundup. (more…)

There’s been a pretty steady drumbeat from leading economists — a recession is coming. In fact, at this month’s National Association of Real Estate Editors journalism convention, all three economists on a dais one Friday found themselves agreeing on two things: a recession is coming, and real estate won’t be the impetus this time.

Frank Nothaft (Corelogic chief economist), Danielle Hale (economist with Realtor.com), George Ratiu (research director with the National Association of Realtors), and Aaron Terrazas (senior economist with Zillow) all agreed that other factors — like tariffs, rising mortgage rates, and even a correction in the stock market — will likely be the cause or causes for a recession. (more…)

recession

Minorities were hit the hardest by the housing crisis, and show lower levels of homeownership today.

The economic recession of 2007-2009 affected most Americans in depressingly real and tangible ways. Two groups of Americans are disproportionately affected, still, by the downturn.

A new study by Apartment List shows that the economic downturn had the greatest impact on homeownership among minorities and young Americans aged 18-45, particularly those in the 35-44 age range.

Analysts at Apartment List, an apartment location website, looked at Census data and reported U.S. homeownership rates in general have fallen steadily, recently dropping to their lowest levels since 1965.

In Dallas, the homeownership rate fell from 60.9 percent to 58.7 percent from 2007-2016. The drops were biggest among African Americans, where homeownership fell by 6.1 percent.

“African Americans were highly affected [by the recession], said said Andrew Woo, director of data science and growth at Apartment List. “In Dallas, it is a large drop [in homeownership], larger than the nation average, which is 5.3 percent. What we notice is that it’s very much tied to employment and socioeconomic trends.”

During this same time period, rents increased by 4.2 percent in Dallas, even as owner costs (mortgage, maintenance, etc.) fell by 11.8 percent. So the people least able to afford it were paying more (in rent), less able to save toward a down payment, and therefore less likely to buy a home.

(more…)

This is how Leobardo Trevino is surviving the real estate recession. The floors at 1600 Pacific and also at The Statler Hilton will be finished up like his shell space on the 18th floor that is ready for a tenant. The construction/freight elevator at the end of the floor (under the red) can haul debris down without disturbing tenants on finished out floors.