Just one car on Fitzhugh?

A couple of weeks ago, I noticed The Terminal condos had hit MLS in pre-sale mode. What’s The Terminal?  It’s a new 19-unit condo building bound by Fitzhugh, Buena Vista Street, and the Katy Trail scheduled for completion in 2021. You may recall seeing it mentioned as one of the cases vetted by the Oak Lawn Committee last November (when it had 25 units).  Well, the renderings are final, the floor plans set and the prices (gasp!) have been announced.

As a quick review, the name is derived from the fact the Katy Trail was originally a train line. The architecture hat-tips that history with large, arched glass openings on the first and second floors. Those floors will be amenity space and public space for eateries abutting the Katy Trail. Along Buena Vista, one of the arches is a public walkway connecting to the trail. Along the far end is a pocket park. Keen eyes will note the power lines – we’ll talk about them later.

Of the 19 units, seven have been listed on MLS – typical ploy in new developments when you want scarcity to drive interest. Unit sizes range from 2,471 square feet (two-bed/two-and-a-half-bath) to the full-floor penthouse shell at 6,577 square feet with another 2,901 square feet of terrace. Prices for the seven MLS listings are from the oddly specific $2,527,445 to $6.65 million. Because of the differing sizes of the units, they’re actually trading in a very tight band of price per square foot of between $1,011 to $1,096.54 – for a mid-rise barely above a busy road with power lines so close you might almost be able to touch them. That’s some mighty high-cotton.

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frisco power lines

After months of preparation, the State Office of Administrative Hearings today began proceedings in Austin regarding a proposed 138,000-volt transmission line across Frisco. This power line has been at the center of a hotly contested debate between Frisco homeowner associations and Realtors on one side and Brazos Electric, CoServ Electric, and the Public Utility Commission (PUC) on the other.

“All the witnesses are done [as of this evening], with briefs due Aug. 28 and reply briefs due Sept. 11,” said Adam Majorie, Government Affairs Director for the Collin County Association of Realtors (CCAR). He spoke to CandysDirt this evening after finishing the day in the hearings. “Once all the briefs are done, the two administrative law judges will go about the task of rendering their decision.”

Of the 715 intervenors testifying (most through written testimony), 683 were part of the Bury the Lines Campaign. The remainder of the intervenors were people from the city of Frisco, Brazos Electric, homeowners not represented by the Bury the Lines campaign, and the PUC staff.

The West Frisco Homeowners Coalition (WFHOC) and CCAR joined forces in September 2014, creating a grassroots campaign, burythelines.org, to oppose the above-ground high-voltage transmission line built by Brazos Electric on behalf of CoServ Electric. They say the line, which will be built through heavily populated neighborhoods along Main Street or Stonebrook Parkway to the Dallas North Tollway, will adversely affect property values and infringe on homeowner property rights. The campaign wants power lines buried, instead.

From the beginning, this has been a highly unusual situation, with Collin County Realtors fighting side-by-side with homeowners.

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Power lines

As expected, on Jan. 15 Brazos Electric Power Cooperative filed a certificate of convenience and necessity (CCN) to build to build a 138,000-volt transmission line across west Frisco. In response, several Frisco homeowners have retained legal counsel to represent their interests to the Public Utility Commission (PUC) of Texas.

Their attorney, Francis B. Majorie of The Majorie Firm Ltd., will be compensated solely from fees arranged for by the Collin County Association of Realtors (CCAR) from the Texas Association of Realtors Issues Mobilization Political Action Committee. Majorie does not represent the CCAR or the West Frisco Homeowners Coalition (WFHOC); he only represents the individuals who have retained him.

“I was approached by several interested homeowners who have retained me and have asked me to be available to answer questions and enable the homeowners to present a united front in that they all have a common interest in asking that the power lines be buried,” Majorie said.

In order to answer questions, there is a town hall meeting Wednesday, Jan. 28 at 6:30 p.m. in the cafeteria of Pioneer Heritage Middle School, 1649 High Shoals Dr., Frisco.

As we reported in November, the WFHOC and CCAR joined forces in September 2014, creating a grassroots campaign, burythelines.org, to oppose the above-ground high-voltage transmission line. Through that website, they have gathered names of potential “intervenors” who could be a part of the legal proceedings surrounding the CCN.

“An intervenor is someone who is directly affected by the imposition of the power line, who chooses to appear and be a party in the proceedings,” Majorie said. “Because they are a party, they have a right to appear at all the hearings, the right to offer evidence, they have to be available to provide discovery to others. It’s the functional equivalent of being a party in a lawsuit.”

A 45-day period where people can voice their concerns to the PUC began when Brazos filed on Jan. 15. The PUC then has up to a year to make its decision regarding transmission line route and if the line will be above ground or below ground. Jump to read more!

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Photo courtesy tenchiro via Creative Commons

Photo courtesy tenchiro via Creative Commons

All eyes are on Collin County as Brazos Electric Power Cooperative plans to apply for permission next week with the Public Utility Commission (PUC) of Texas to build a 138,000-volt transmission line across Frisco.

A rare partnership between Frisco homeowner associations and realtors to fight the proposed above-ground power lines has caught the attention of regulators in the state capitol.

“Realtors don’t get involved in regulatory issues very much—Austin is paying very close attention, and the regulatory community as a whole is definitely interested in this issue,” said Adam Majorie, Government Affairs Director for the Collin County Association of Realtors (CCAR). “It’s rare to have such a pronounced public outcry, and the PUC acknowledged this in our meeting yesterday.”

As we reported in November, the West Frisco Homeowners Coalition (WFHOC) and CCAR joined forces in September 2014, creating a grassroots campaign, burythelines.org, to oppose the above-ground high-voltage transmission line built by Brazos on behalf of CoServ Electric. They say the line, which will run through heavily populated neighborhoods between the Dallas North Tollway and Farm-to-Market Road 423, would adversely affect property values and infringe on homeowner property rights. The campaign wants power lines buried, instead.

Their efforts have already had an impact: The power company’s application to the PUC next week is expected to include underground line options, in addition to the original proposal of an above-ground, 120-foot, double-circuit power line along either Stonebrook Parkway or Main Street in Frisco. The official name given by Brazos is the Stonebrook Transmission Line and Substation project. Jump to read more.

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At the recent Frisco town hall meeting, a Collin County Association of Realtors member said above-ground power lines like those proposed by Brazos/CoServ would negatively impact home values by 5 to 20 percent along the selected route. Map: CCAR

At the recent Frisco town hall meeting, a Collin County Association of Realtors member said above-ground power lines like those proposed by Brazos/CoServ would negatively impact home values by 5 to 20 percent along the selected route. Map: CCAR

The gloves are off in northern suburb Frisco as homeowners fight against a power line proposed by Brazos Electric Power Cooperative Inc. and CoServ Electric.

But in an unprecedented twist, Frisco Realtors are fighting side-by-side with homeowners for their home values and property rights.

At the heart of the issue is a suggested above-ground, 138,000-volt, double-circuit power line along either Stonebrook Parkway or Main Street in Frisco, built by Brazos on behalf of CoServ. The power line will start at an existing transmission line west of the Dallas North Tollway, and run between 2.7 and 4.1 miles, depending on the approved route, to a new substation to be built on King Road, west of Farm-to-Market Road 423. The new power line would serve growth in Frisco, Little Elm and The Colony, one of the fastest growing areas in the nation.

This prospect has the West Frisco Homeowners Coalition (WFHOC) and Collin County Association of Realtors (CCAR) working together oppose the 12-story power line, proposing instead that Brazos/CoServ build the line underground. They say the above-ground high-voltage transmission line, which will run through densely populated neighborhoods, will adversely affect the rights of homeowners.

“This is not simply about lowering property values—we see this as a huge home ownership, private property rights infringement,” said Adam Majorie, Government Affairs Director for the CCAR. “We think [the above-ground lines] will have a detrimental impact on homeowners themselves, because it affects on the whole neighborhood, and it impacts the homeowners’ nest eggs.”

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Oncor power outage map

Icemageddon 2013 has left around 240,000 people without power, according to Oncor. The largest numbers of outages are concentrated in Dallas and Collin Counties, they said.

And a large number of people in Tarrant, Denton, Ellis and Kaufman counties also do not have power.

Freezing rain turned to ice overnight, accumulating on tree limbs and leaves. Those limbs fell into power lines, affecting service. Then car wrecks, where cars hit street poles connected to power lines, also caused problems.

Pity the poor power company employees: Oncor COO Jim Greer said there were more than 2,500 Oncor employees responding to power outages Friday.

“Crews from utilities as far away as Florida are responding in north Texas to assist with power restoration to Oncor customers,” Greer said.

If you have an event planned, figure that it is cancelled. Better to stay home and be safe than sorry. The freezing rain may be behind us, but low temperatures will hold the ice accumulation like a very efficient Sub Zero freezer. Any new precipitation will just freeze again, leading to the possibility of more power outages.

Hunker down: we are stuck in our homes for the weekend!

For 24/7 power outage information, follow live updates from the Oncor Storm Center here: http://stormcenter.oncor.com/default.html and to report a power outage in your area, click here. You can also text “REG” or “OUT” to 66267, or call Oncor’s outage hotline at 888-313-4747.

In my ‘hood, half of us have power –heat, light, refrigeration. For those who do not, we may invite them over. Now is when those five fireplaces may come in handy to light, and your freezer should be ok for about 24 hours if you don’t open the door.

Of course, your patio is now one giant freezer!