804 - Living 3

For better or worse, we all make snap judgements when we see houses.  My first thought as I looked through the pictures for this home was that there didn’t appear to be a comfortable seat in the house.  It’s as though some unseen maiden aunt had eschewed comfort for herself and guests.

My second thought was that the wood floors look spectacular.  Regardless of whether you like the pattern, you have to admit they’re really well done.

The third thought I had was how completely different this home is to its neighboring penthouse, 801 featured in Vol. 1.  While 801 may attract groovy, middle-aged buyers, the buyer of 804, located just a few feet away, would seem to be generationally different.

But would they?

(more…)

Living room in zig-zag glory

Living room in zig-zag glory

The Park Plaza is in a bit of an enclave.  It’s hollering distance from Whole Foods when you want to cook and Nonna when you don’t; PK’s for good red wine and the French Laundry when you spill it.  There’s even a Methodist Family Health Center on the corner.  If you want to scoot downtown, you’ve almost got a private Tollway entrance and exit. Even the complex’s size is personal at just 46 units.

I went to see unit 801 because of the WTF pictures.  Listed with Meredith Houston with Briggs Freeman for $2.895 million after a recent $400,000 drop, this 5,324-square-foot home offers three bedrooms and three full and one half bathroom.  It’s also got a spiffy big 300-ish square feet of patio overlooking downtown that’s A-OK to barbeque on (a rarity in a high-rise).

The home was also formerly owned by Henry S. Miller Jr. and his wife Juanita.  Showcasing the family’s increasing fortunes, this home is quite a bit larger than Miller Sr.’s South Blvd. digs.

(more…)

Park Plaza

We’re continuing our roundup of 1980s high-rises so slink into your Bob Mackie and pop yourself a Bartles & Jaymes and read on.  Missed part one?  Catch up here.

Park Plaza: 4500 Roland Ave.

I will not be this 46-unit building’s target audience for decades, because at 76 percent, the Park Plaza has the highest rate of over-65 tax exemption filers in the city.

I called the Park Plaza a cannibal because I’ve been told there was an older building on the site that was stripped to the steel skeleton and reconstructed into the Park Plaza. The story goes this was the only way to keep the height and footprint of the original building as Highland Park building codes had changed. The logic is much like some communities that classify a “renovation” as leaving at least one original wall versus a “complete” new-build – it’s done to avoid zoning changes or the potential cost, permitting and taxation differences.

(more…)