Spanish Revival at its finest

Built in 1928 but updated to 2019, you’ll find an amazing property at 2308 Winton Terrace West. (Photos: Trey Freeze Media)

It’s not easy to do. It takes time, patience, money, and certainly skill. I’m not talking about negotiating the government shutdown stalemate, I’m talking about perfectly mingling new materials and construction into an older home. What did you think I was talking about?

Think about it — most contractors want to simply tear down an older home and not mess with the hassle and painstaking fuss that comes with reviving it.

Spanish Revival flair

Beautiful barrel ceiling in formal living with upstairs catwalk

It’s also a tedious job, as many sizes of doors, windows, bathrooms and certainly closets were not up to the standard of savvy 2019 buyers.

When it’s done correctly, it’s a thing of beauty.

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Winton Terrace west

One great perks of the job that comes with writing for CandysDirt.com, is meeting some really great agents. Last week we looked at a historic, honey of a house in Hemphill Heights listed by Briggs Freeman’s Gwen Harper, who had such an interesting portfolio that I contacted her about one of her listings at 2225 West Winton Terrace West in Park Hill. Actually, her portfolio is a bit slimmer this week owing to recent sales, including the Heights property, which predictably went under contract after last week’s open house.

The truth is, I don’t need much of an excuse to tempt me into Park Hill, one of my favorite and one of the loveliest of all Fort Worth neighborhoods. What is it about Park Hill? Park Hill has a solidity and sense of permanence that comes with time. Distinctive houses rest on deep set-back bluff lots, enveloped in beautiful landscaping and mature trees. And then there is — excuse the foreign phrase — an elusive, Park Hill je ne sais quoi. The more one dissects the romantic façade of a Park Hill beauty of 1920s vintage, the more layers of true architectural sophistication one uncovers. (more…)

Occasionally an exceptional listing — a perfect combination of unique, beautiful architecture, landscaping, location, and pricing — leaps out and demands your attention. And evidently many others agreed with me. Listing agent Martha Price thought the vintage, thankfully un-updated baths and the one-car garage might potentially make 2200 Winton Terrace a bit of a slow mover. Still, she priced the 1929 Spanish style house at $250 per square foot — the median per-square-foot price for Park Hill these days. The result? Only listed yesterday, it had eight near back-to-back showings and got a full price offer. (more…)

Topping Trulia’s list of highest average sale prices by neighborhood, I was surprised to discover lovely Park Hill. With an average sale price of $1.722 million, it beats better-known, pricey enclaves such as Mira Vista and Monticello. I was, therefore, further surprised to discover a prime Park Hill address at 2224 Winton Terrace with terrace views of the wooded hill adjoining the Fort Worth Zoo for the relatively bargain price of $899,000.

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2323 Medford Court WestFort Worth’s Near Southside is replete with venerable old neighborhoods, rich in appeal. Among them is Park Hill, a neighborhood comprised of a handful of shaded bends. Just above the Fort Worth Zoo could almost be described as a enclave. In spite of the array of styles — some stately, some quirky — and a range of scales — near castles and  quaint cottages — Park Hill has the consistency of demeanor that only comes with age.

The poised grande dame that is 2323 Medford Court West is a perfect specimen of pure, Park Hill enchantment. (more…)

 

On Sandage St. near TCU, two large, zero-lot-line homes have been built next door to one another. To curb the trend of investors tearing down homes to build "stealth dorms," residents are supporting greater restrictions for the number of co-habiting adults in these homes. (Photo: Max Faulkner/Fort Worth Star-Telegram)

On Sandage St. near TCU, two large, zero-lot-line homes have been built next door to one another. To curb the trend of investors tearing down homes to build “stealth dorms,” residents are supporting greater restrictions for the number of co-habiting adults in these homes. (Photo: Max Faulkner/Fort Worth Star-Telegram)

This is an interesting story out of Fort Worth, as some neighborhoods push back against big, zero-lot-line homes full of college kids by proposing an overlay to limit unrelated adult residents to three per single-family home instead of the current five. The overlay, which in its current version would not grandfather existing properties, is facing some stiff opposition from investors. They’re pooling their funds and preparing for a legal battle, according to the story in the Star-Telegram:

“We did it how they said to do it,” Kyle O’Keefe, an investor and resident in the overlay, said of the homes they built. “If they go back and change it, that is a break of trust. That is saying, ‘Hey, you guys come in and invest in our city make it a great city and then we are going to screw the hell out of you in a couple of years.”

This is interesting, because while the restrictions are aimed toward protecting the integrity of the neighborhoods surrounding Texas Christian University, they’re targeting a specific group of homes: Large four- and five-bedroom houses in districts surrounding TCU, that are usually rented to college students and dubbed “stealth dormitories.” Residents are mostly concerned about noise, trash, and traffic.

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