Tudor Manor House

This historic Tudor manor house in Lakewood is what I refer to as a once-in-a-lifetime home. When you are lucky enough to purchase an architectural wonder like this, you don’t leave. The house has changed hands only three times since being built in 1926. It’s now for sale, and I genuinely envy the lucky person that nabs this beauty. It’s one of my all-time favorite homes.

We’re particularly lucky in Dallas to have incredible residential homes designed by notable architects, yet some still rise above the rest. This Tudor manor house is one of them. It has an unmatched pedigree.
Tudor Manor House

Sir Alfred Bossom designed the house for Arthur Kramer, president of A. Harris and Company, one of the many great department stores of downtown Dallas that is now just a historical footnote. In the 1920s Lakewood was considered the countryside, which is one reason the movers and shakers of the city, such as Stanley Marcus, built homes here.

(more…)

As you know, Jo and I have a “thing” for English Tudors, being English majors and all. Still high off of 1310 West Canterbury, I found 6835 Westlake courtesy of Marilyn Hoffman in Lakewood, and it took my breath away. I have been canoodling with this house all day! Nestled on one of Lakewood’s most coveted streets, this home is like an architectural history lesson. Marilyn says it was built in  the 1920’s by the renowned English architect, Sir Alfred Bossom, the architect for the Magnolia Building, Dallas’ first skyscraper, and more than 300 other skyscrapers and famous buildings. It was built for Arthur Harris, owner of A. Harris and Company which later became Sanger Harris, which was then folded into Foleys, which was folded into Macy’s. This must have been department store retailer row. The home is right down the street from 6735 Westlake, the Herbert Marcus estate, which closed last October for $2,565,000. Like most homes built during the ’20s, and like the Marcus estate, the place is a fortress with a full basement, steel framed construction, imported slate roof, high beamed ceilings, wide plank flooring. As Marilyn puts it: you built homes back then to last a century, or longer. No kidding: Sir Bossom also collaborated with Frank Lloyd Wright on the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, one of the few buildings that survived the earthquake that destroyed Tokyo in 1923.  

This home has the very same type of foundation. Unlike most homes du jour, however, Sir Bossom (I so want to type Blossom) took note of my mantra: you can never be too thin, too rich or have too many closets: this home has 35!

There are ten (10!) in the master bedroom alone! (more…)

6735 Westlake

Herbert Marcus estate

6835 Westlake 6835 Westlake music 6835 Westlake stairs 6835 Westlake ext 2 6835 Westlake LRAs you know, Jo and I have a “thing” for English Tudors, being English majors and all. Still high off of 1310 West Canterbury, I found 6835 Westlake courtesy of Marilyn Hoffman in Lakewood, and it took my breath away. I have been canoodling with this house all day! Nestled on one of Lakewood’s most coveted streets, this home is like an architectural history lesson. Marilyn says it was built in  the 1920’s by the renowned English architect, Sir Alfred Blossom, the architect for the Magnolia Building, Dallas’ first skyscraper, and more than 300 other skyscrapers and famous buildings. It was built for Arthur Harris, owner of A. Harris and Company which later became Sanger Harris, which was then folded into Foleys, which was folded into Macy’s. This must have been department store retailer row. The home is right down the street from 6735 Westlake, the Herbert Marcus estate, which closed last October for $2,565,000. Like most homes built during the ’20s, and like the Marcus estate, the place is a fortress with a full basement, steel framed construction, imported slate roof, high beamed ceilings, wide plank flooring. As Marilyn puts it: you built homes back then to last a century, or longer. Sir Blossom also collaborated with Frank Lloyd Wright on the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, one of the few buildings that survived the earthquake that destroyed Tokyo in 1923.  This home has the very same type of foundation. Unlike most homes du jour, however, Sir Blossom (sweet name) took note of my mantra: you can never be too thin, too rich or have too many closets: this home has 35!

There are ten (10!) in the master bedroom alone.

$$$ Here’s the other thing that caught my eye: this home is not for sale in the conventional manner. The owner will trade the home for a ranch, a larger home, or rare coins. I’ve heard  of house swapping, but this is more like dirt or metal swapping.

Marilyn says the home has been featured in a number of movies and was once the cover home of Robb Report Magazine. Also, the the grounds were the setting for the first performance of Ballet Dallas. You can see why from the enormous drive-up appeal and the elegant set-back. The home is 7800 square feet, with four living areas, 6 bedrooms, 6 and a half baths, three stories and 8 fireplaces. There is also that basement with a wine cellar, coal chute and a chicken coop. The third floor contains a ballroom with catering kitchen and marble thresholds. Built on a 1.2 acre lot, the Tudor also has a gorgeous guest house with two bedrooms, two baths and a full kitchen. The main home has a library, a 60 foot long gallery, 27 foot long dining room, totally updated (and huge!) kitchen, and Butlers pantry for an actual butler. The entire house beckons back to a gracious living standard that thrived in this part of Dallas. Fashionable people had help, and this was a home for the fashionable.

Asking price: will trade for a ranch, a bigger house, or rare coins.  Guess Facebook stock is no longer an option, but I cannot imagine they would turn down a few oil and gas leases…6835 Westlake pool

 

I first wrote about this penthouse-to-end-all-penthouses last summer, when Greg Brady, former president of i-2 Technology once (and probably still) the Mark Zuckerberg of supply-chain management, was offering not just a BMW Z8 in at closing but a week on his yacht, the Noble House, to whoever would hand over eight million dolla — actually, $7,999,000 big ones. Then listing agent Babs Holder reduced the price to $6,490,000, kept the cruise. Unfortunately, no bites, even for a big fish. Now it’s listed with Marilyn Hoffman as I may have mentioned a couple weeks ago, the list price has scooted up to $6,800,000. And I wonder if that STILL includes the cruise or car.  No mention of that on the Forbes slideshow, but sure am glad to see a Dallas condo up there on the bigscreen.

And yes, we think this is a perfect fit for Eric Nicholson over at the Dallas Observer and UnFair Park.

 

Champ d’Or closed Monday, April 30 (according to Laura Brady of Concierge Auctions). Which means it is official: Shirley and Al Goldfield no longer own the Hickory Creek mega mansion they have been trying to sell almost since the day they completed the 40,000 square foot plus home. Talk about things you might regret: I saw Realtor Marilyn Hoffman a few weeks ago at the patron party for the Dallas Art Fair. She told me she once brought Mr. Goldfield an offer for $44 million he turned down. Another high profile agent tells me he was almost kicked out of the house when he offered to take the listing for an asking price of no more than $29 million back in 2009. We know Champ sold at auction a month ago at a reserve starting at $10.3 million, which means that was the minimum bidding price. Do you recall the story I wrote with another luxury real estate auction house when I asked what would happen if the reserve was not even met?

Sources tell me the Goldfields, surprise maybe, had a little mortgage on Champs of about $8.5 million. They also tell me the home likely sold for less than the reserve, about $8.7 million. Didn’t have to take money to closing, thank God. And the important thing here is a four letter word: SOLD.

The buyers are being kept a secret. But you know how long that lasts on the street. Word is they might be the matriarchs of a lovely family called the Tabanis, who are well known in the Dallas commercial real estate world. Recently they took an office at 16600 Dallas Parkway. Word from my sources is they specialize in distressed real estate and make no less than a million profit per transaction. Of course I’ve called and asked for an interview… so stay tuned.

We know the Azure is sports stud central. Deion Sanders also has a huge place at The Azure, recall, on the 30th floor right next door to i-2 Technology’s former chieftain Greg A. Brady. Listed with Marilyn Hoffman of Hoffman International Reality, Deion’s 5025 square foot penthouse  with roof terrace, private terrace lounge, two stories and just everything, was priced at $7,500,000 on September 17, 2009. There’s more than 9,000 sqaure feet if you count the terraces!  It went off the market earlier this year, about the time Deion had some water issues at his Frisco mansion, but Marilyn and associate Vanessa Andrews have great copyrighted photos of it all on their site — right here!

Guess he’s not feeling real bullish about the market these days. Deion Sanders has snapped his whopping 29,000-square-foot home way north of Dallas off the market. You know the one — drive due north on Preston Road to Prosper, and there it sits on 109 acres. He even has his own football field.  Sanders has had the home priced at $21 million since 2009.

The 43-year-old NFL Hall of Famer and Redskin, who also played in baseball’s World Series, built the 10-bedroom mansion and added a football field plus 12-acre lake. There’s also a basketball court, a rec room filled with arcade games, a movie room, bowling alley, indoor and outdoor pools, a tennis court, a guest house and of course a Hall of Fame gallery.

The most recent Realtor is Marilyn Hoffman of Hoffman International Realty. She told the Wall Street Journal: “They wanted to have a grand house in a beautiful setting in which to raise their children.” No word on why they wanted to sell that beautiful setting prior to now.

‘Course we are wondering if this has anything at all to do with the water damage Deion Twittered out last February:

Yes, posted this on his Twitter account. Of course ALL  home damage has to be divulged to any prospective buyer, but putting it on Twitter really just kind of puts it out there.