shopping

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From staff reports

There was a time where shoppers may not have cared if Amazon was slightly more expensive than big-box retailers — the convenience outweighed any slight differences.

But now that the two biggest of the big boxes have upped their game when it comes to online shopping, LendEDU looked to see where the bigger savings really were: Amazon, Walmart, or Target?

“While Amazon has long been considered the most convenient option for buying practically anything online, Walmart and Target are getting competitive,” writes Ted McCarthy. “The latter two both offer free two-day shipping on orders of $35 and over without any membership required.”

Amazon offers free shipping (and several other amenities) with its Amazon Prime, which costs $12.99 a month or $119 a year.

LendEDU compared 50 nearly identical items from Amazon, Walmart, and Target to see what the pricing difference was. To qualify for the comparison, the items had to be available for shopping on all three sites. The comparison looked at home goods, food and beverage, kitchen/appliances, technology and entertainment, and miscellaneous items. (more…)

save

Photo courtesy Joint Base San Antonio

From staff reports

Not quite 20 percent of Americans surveyed by LendEDU said their goal was to save enough to retire one day, but almost 40 percent of them felt that goal was unattainable.

The survey was released earlier this month, and polled 1,000 Americans to understand their financial goals and their confidence that they could meet them. The data was then sorted further by generation.

Also on many minds was paying off credit card debt — 14 percent said it was a goal, but seven percent weren’t confident they would. Twenty percent said they wanted to buy their own home, but 17 percent didn’t believe they would be able to do so. 

Four percent of the post-millennial age bracket said they’d like to invest in real estate — more than the stock market or creating a retirement account. (more…)

From staff reports

Across all income brackets, Millennials said they don’t think they are wealthy, a new survey of 1,000 people who fall in the 23-38 age bracket conducted by LendEDU revealed.

The company set out to find out how the generation that is eclipsing the Baby Boomer generation frames personal finance and the concept of wealthy.

“The 1,000 respondents were split evenly between three income brackets, allowing us to analyze where millennials from each economic class are similar and different in their views on finance,” LendEDU research analyst Mike Brown said.

The three income brackets were divided as $49,999 or lower; $50,000 to $99,999; $100,000 or higher.

LendEDU

Across every income bracket, respondents overwhelmingly said that they did not consider themselves to be wealthy. (more…)