3808 Turtle Creek FrontWith another real estate auction coming to Dallas, Texas as the incredible Les Jardins estate designed by Anton F. Korn Jr. is slated to be sold to the highest bidder on April 24, I thought we might want to better understand the real estate auction process. The question arises, who pays for the auction expenses and the agent commissions? I found this great video of Concierge Auction president Laura Brady from Inman Real Estate Connect this past January. As you know, Les Jardins at 3808 Turtle Creek, is listed by Keith Conlon of the Matthews-Nichols group at Allie Beth Allman. The property will be auctioned by Concierge Auctions of New York City, New York, on April 24. In this video, Laura does an excellent job of explaining how Concierge nets an income from the auction process and markets through permission-based marketing. Concierge also charges a buyer’s premium to the winning bidder, which is 10% of the high bid amount. So on, for example, a $5 million dollar home, that could be half a million dollars. But Concierge only charges the premium on the high bid amount less the opening bid. This way, the auction gets an opening bid with each registration, and bidders are incentivized to toss out an opening bid. The higher the bid, the smaller your buyer’s reserve. So if the house sells for $500,000,000, the buyer’s premium is $5,000,000 less the winning bidder’s opening bid. If that opening bid was $3 million, they pay 10% on $2 million or a measly $200,000.

Capiche?

3808 Turtle Creek FrontWith another real estate auction coming to Dallas, Texas as the incredible Les Jardins estate designed by Anton F. Korn Jr. is slated to be sold to the highest bidder on April 24, I thought we might want to better understand the real estate auction process. The question arises, who pays for the auction expenses and the agent commissions? I found this great video of Concierge Auction president Laura Brady from Inman Real Estate Connect this past January. As you know, Les Jardins at 3808 Turtle Creek, is listed by Keith Conlon of the Matthews-Nichols group at Allie Beth Allman. The property will be auctioned by Concierge Auctions of New York City, New York, on April 24. In this video, Laura does an excellent job of explaining how Concierge nets an income from the auction process and markets through permission-based marketing. Concierge also charges a buyer’s premium to the winning bidder, which is 10% of the high bid amount. So on, for example, a $5 million dollar home, that could be half a million dollars. But Concierge only charges the premium on the high bid amount less the opening bid. This way, the auction gets an opening bid with each registration, and bidders are incentivized to toss out an opening bid. The higher the bid, the smaller your buyer’s reserve. So if the house sells for $500,000,000, the buyer’s premium is $5,000,000 less the winning bidder’s opening bid. If that opening bid was $3 million, they pay 10% on $2 million or a measly $200,000.

Capiche?

“Sellers very pleased with sale” — boy if that isn’t the understatement of the century! Details of Friday’s sale of Champ d’Or by auction up in Denton are eeking out. I got word from Laura Brady with Concierge Auctions that the buyers are definitely a family who apparently plans to live in the 40,000 square foot mansion. And that makes me so happy.

And the Denton Record-Chronicle apparently got in a word with the owner,  cellphone mogul Al Goldfield.

Goldfield said he’s happy a family will be living there, and happy that the megamansion wasn’t purchased as an investment property.

“They are going to get a great house at a great price,” Goldfield said.

About that price: I am digging, of course, and beg you to stay tuned. But a sharp reader brought up a very good point in the comments:

The registration requirements stated that anyone who registered was required to place a bid at or above the minimum reserve and if they didn’t place a dollar amount it was assumed they were bidding at the minimum starting bid. This would mean that at least the house will sell at 10.3 million.

So there’s a clue. I do recall Joan Eleazer, who I hope is getting ready to set sail for a celebratory cruise on The World (though I hear she has some contracts pending, so probably busy working as we speak) telling me Goldfield might even take $15 million for the property. The Goldfields, meanwhile, still have a home in the vicinity of Champ and a second home at the Broadmore in Colorado Springs, CO.

 

I have been on pins and needles waiting out this auction, bugging Robbie Briggs and Laura Brady at Concierge Actions all day yesterday. At about eight p.m. last night Robbie Briggs emailed me that “It was a fascinating process, and it appears to be successful.” Today I heard from Laura Brady who said — “we haven’t released details to anyone… the high bidder has formally requested confidentiality about their name and the high bid amount.” Which means the house did sell, we just don’t know for how much and who it sold to.

Great news!

Refresher: the 48,000-square-foot Hickory Creek mansion, known as Champ d’Or, which translates to “Fields of Gold,” was put up for auction by Concierge Auctions out of New York Friday, March 30 with a minimum reserve bid of $10.3 million. Champ d’Or cost about $46 million, took five years to build, and has been sitting on the market for umpteen years. Last market listing was $35 million and at least five local brokers have attempted to shed the house. The Denton County mansion was last appraised for tax purposes at $9.72 million, according to the Denton County Appraisal District. Champ d’Or was modeled after Vaux-le-Vicomte chateau in Paris.

Reading between the lines, I’m wondering if there was a confidentiality clause signed.

I have so many questions: how many bidders were there? Did they meet the reserve? Did they go into private negotiations? Were the bidders actually there? In most auctions, experts tell me they show up 75% of the time, unlike luxury auto auctions. They like to see the process and what they are buying. Sometimes buyers do send their brokers or POA reps.

I asked a veteran local real estate auction expert (who asked to remain confidential) to speculate on a couple of scenarios and tell me what HE THOUGHT went down. Speculation here, folks. What if, I asked, they didn’t meet the reserve yesterday? Let’s say they stalled out at 7 million, he said, you know everyone is staring at each other, they just thank everyone for participating and end the auction. They may take the top bidders aside, say hey we didn’t make the reserve, what are you interested in putting into this property? In other words,  private negotiations begin.

“Pending contract” could mean they are still trying to work out a contract, they didn’t make the reserve and are still negotiating. “Sale pending” may have indicated they made the reserve.

Now let’s say it sold at auction, met the reserve, bingo. Typically, there are no contingencies. If they negotiated privately, the buyer may have said I want to bring in my own inspectors,  etc., which any realtor knows just opens up the door for guess what: more negotiations.

The sprawling estate was drawing widespread interest from buyers across the U.S. and internationally, Laura Brady, vice president of marketing for Concierge Auctions, told the Dallas Morning News’s James Ragland. I know that, because even people from Japan who had seen it on my blog were emailing me about it. A refundable $250,000 cashier’s check was required to register, the number of bidders was confidential. James asked Laura some great questions:

Potential buyers were expressing interest in pursuing “the property for residential purposes, which is how it’s used now,” as well as possibly using it for a business headquarters, she said. Brady said developers also had designs on the property, which is about 40 miles north of Dallas.