historic

Photo courtesy Tenth Street Historic District

Editor’s Note: Preserving the historic neighborhoods that have shaped Dallas should be a priority. But despite historic district designations, Black neighborhoods that were home to Dallasites before, during, and after redlining are seeing a troubling amount of demolitions of homes that, residents insist, would be saved if in other historic districts — predominately white historic districts — in the city.

Today begins a look at two of those districts — Tenth Street, and Wheatley Place, where the Folk style, Victorian, and Craftsman houses that tell the stories of Dallas are felled by demolition crews at a rapid clip.

Robert Swann, to many, is the guy you go to when you want to learn about the Tenth Street Historic District. Swann, who has a master’s degree in architecture from Harvard, came back to Dallas and watched as the neighborhood declined.

In 2008, he began to look for a home in the historic neighborhood to buy — and when he found the vacant one he eventually purchased, he found that there were several heirs. That search touched off a personal quest to learn the history of the district.

So when Swann saw the irony in the fact that, during Black History Month, the City of Dallas demolished one house in the historically Black neighborhood on February 14, and had plans to demolish another house soon, he took to Facebook.

228 South Cliff (Photo courtesy Robert Swann)

“Apparently, Dallas celebrates Black History Month by demolishing homes in African American landmark districts,” he said, explaining that 228 South Cliff was demolished, and The William Smith House, located at 1105 E. Ninth St. was in danger. (more…)

The Iconic Meadows Building

What do new owners GlenStar have planned for the iconic Meadows Building?

The past year has been full of firsts for me at 1500 Marilla. First there was the Planning Commission (who, as unpaid appointees, I wonder how the commissioners live) and then a full council session. Today I was last-minuted into attending a meeting of the Dallas Landmark Commission. Each new experience in the Dallas City Council chambers has had its own frustrations … and free wifi.

Today’s agenda tipped the scales at 420 pages … yes, 420 pages. If I was ever going to start a 4:20 habit, wading through this agenda might’ve been a catalyst.

Anyway, the lion’s share of the agenda is for small, relatively piddly things … lots and lots of piddly things. Paint colors on historic structures, window restoration techniques, fence construction, brick repair, landscaping … every piddly decision an owner needs approved because they own a protected structure. Adding to the agenda’s bulk were pictures, paint chips and drawings for every morsel of work needing approval. Don’t get me wrong, these are all fine and right things someone has to do, but to someone not part of it all, piddly.

Luckily for us all, those types of decisions and deliberations are/were done in a work session before the Landmark Commission hit the horseshoe … otherwise we’d all need a 4:20 the size of a Sequoia tree.

(more…)