Gig Economy

I adore Joel Kotkin and agree with most everything he writes. In fact, I have written for him, and wish I had time to do more.

By the way, don’t ever let anyone tell you that blogging is fast and easy. It’s not. All writing sucks up an inordinate amount of time. When I visited Joel in California, his wife told me he is always, always at the computer writing. Pretty much the same here now.

Like most of us, I have been struggling to make real estate sense of the crazy reality show our White House has become, balancing that with the extreme weirdness — and intensity — of the coming elections. There are many examples, but Texas governor! A former Dallas County Sheriff who didn’t pay her property taxes on time (“better to offer low rent than pay taxes on time, she says“) is running against a staunch conservative incumbent governor. The Ted Cruz vs. Beto O’Rourke race is just war, and in these two, as many races across the U.S., you could not find more polar opposite candidates.

Middle-of-the-road, centrist politics was buried with John McCain, it seems.

Where will this take our country and what will it do to the housing market, already whiplashed from the new tax law?

Will the new tax law, which limits the mortgage deduction to $750,000 worth of debt and limits your property tax deduction to $10,000 (about a $700,000 home in Dallas) force more to sell their homes and become renters? Dallas is only second to New York City in apartment starts, and 2017 brought in 30,000 units with more than 50,000 under construction. (Dallas rents are actually now beginning to recede.) I am seeing some stunning luxury apartments the likes of which we have never had, that I would move into in a New York minute (stay tuned). Then I see luxury listings lowering prices to sell, while the under $500,000 market remains on steroids. What gives? Where are we going with all this?

Oligarchal socialism, says Joel. It allows “for the current, ever-growing concentration of wealth and power in a few hands — notably tech and financial moguls — while seeking ways to ameliorate the reality of growing poverty, slowing social mobility and indebtedness. This will be achieved not by breaking up or targeting the oligarchs, which they would fight to the bitter end, but through the massive increase in state taxpayer support.”

Bingo.

(more…)

Phillips Creek Ranch houseDare I say it — after all I’m a transplant, too, from Illinois, though I got here as quick as I could: tell these immigrants they are welcome, but leave their higher tax and social spending mentalities back in their previous home state!  

Last couple weeks have been a real estate blur. I was up in Frisco at Phillips Creek Ranch, where the dirt is flying as Republic Property group develops 957 acres into 547 home sites, bringing in more than 2,500 homes and 12,000 residents — whew! Across Legacy, Craig Ranch is getting hot. In fact, go north of Legacy and you may need a bandanna — dirt is just blowing in the wind as the ‘dozers prep homesites for thousands of families. I spoke to the marketing director of a large national home builder who knows his website stats forward and backwards: people are moving to Texas in droves, he told me, and the top feeder states are the boo-boo blue states California, Illinois and New York, in that order.

Which correlates totally to what Joanna wrote awhile back: it may not be our lower taxes that are bringing in all these transplants. It may be our great housing prices.

The blue states, writes Joel Kotkin, seem pretty intent on keeping that steady stream of affluent migration to us streaming. Shall we thank them? Pretty soon the only folks left behind in the “boo-booed” blue will be the very rich and the poor:

They appear to have chosen an economic path that essentially penalizes their own middle and upper-middle class residents, believing that keeping up public spending, including on public employee pensions, represents the best way to boost their economy. Yet the gambit of raising state income taxes could not be coming at a worse time. The president’s adopted tax reforms have eliminated write-offs for state taxes for those individuals with incomes over $250,000 and families earning over $300,000. As a result, the affluent residents of these states — California, New York, New Jersey and Illinois alone count for 40% of these deductions nationally — now can expect to get whacked coming and going.

The affluent, notes Kotkin, are not billionaires. Between 2006 and 2009, he writes, California lost a net 45,000 taxpayers earning between $5 million and $300,000 a year, according to the Ca. State Department of Finance. That’s your work-horse population: they are abundant, hard-working, procreate and consume. They also pay taxes but are the ones who seem to get really whacked, as Kotkin calls it, whenever Washington or the state legislature needs money. Why? Well the poor slug earning $30,000 a year isn’t going to pay up, and the billionaires have at their fingertips staffs of CPAs and off-shore trusts — minimum investment $500,000 — where they can minimize taxes and run their estates like corporations. Look at corporations like Facebook, Wells Fargo, and General Electric who apparently pay no taxes.

Another plus for us: those $300K to $5 million a year wage earners moving to Texas also buy houses, often plural. I’m hearing now that US Air execs are starting to house hunt in Dallas, moving here from Phoenix.

Kotkin says that last year, all ten of the leading states gaining domestic migrants were low-tax states, including five with no income tax: Texas, Florida, Tennessee, Washington and Nevada. The highest rates of outward-bound migration came from New Jersey, New York, Illinois and California. That will leave those states with fewer to support the tax raises and pension benefit increasing they are enacting — which may act as a fiscal band aid at first, the “fiscal crack”, as revenues increase and the economy appears to recover.

But then, slowly, the $300K to $5M a year worker bees say we’ve had enough, see ya’, wouldn’t want to be ya, and they come to Texas.

Dare I say it — after all I’m a transplant, too, from Illinois, though I got here as quick as I could: tell these immigrants they are welcome, but leave their higher tax and social spending mentalities back in their previous home.

 

Phillips Creek Ranch houseDare I say it — after all I’m a transplant, too, from Illinois, though I got here as quick as I could: tell these immigrants they are welcome, but leave their higher tax and social spending mentalities back in their previous home state!  

Last couple weeks have been a real estate blur. I was up in Frisco at Phillips Creek Ranch, where the dirt is flying as Republic Property group develops 957 acres into 547 home sites, bringing in more than 2,500 homes and 12,000 residents — whew! Across Legacy, Craig Ranch is getting hot. In fact, go north of Legacy and you may need a bandanna — dirt is just blowing in the wind as the ‘dozers prep homesites for thousands of families. I spoke to the marketing director of a large national home builder who knows his website stats forward and backwards: people are moving to Texas in droves, he told me, and the top feeder states are the boo-boo blue states California, Illinois and New York, in that order.

Which correlates totally to what Joanna wrote awhile back: it may not be our lower taxes that are bringing in all these transplants. It may be our great housing prices.

The blue states, writes Joel Kotkin, seem pretty intent on keeping that steady stream of affluent migration to us streaming. Shall we thank them? Pretty soon the only folks left behind in the “boo-booed” blue will be the very rich and the poor:

They appear to have chosen an economic path that essentially penalizes their own middle and upper-middle class residents, believing that keeping up public spending, including on public employee pensions, represents the best way to boost their economy. Yet the gambit of raising state income taxes could not be coming at a worse time. The president’s adopted tax reforms have eliminated write-offs for state taxes for those individuals with incomes over $250,000 and families earning over $300,000. As a result, the affluent residents of these states — California, New York, New Jersey and Illinois alone count for 40% of these deductions nationally — now can expect to get whacked coming and going.

The affluent, notes Kotkin, are not billionaires. Between 2006 and 2009, he writes, California lost a net 45,000 taxpayers earning between $5 million and $300,000 a year, according to the Ca. State Department of Finance. That’s your work-horse population: they are abundant, hard-working, procreate and consume. They also pay taxes but are the ones who seem to get really whacked, as Kotkin calls it, whenever Washington or the state legislature needs money. Why? Well the poor slug earning $30,000 a year isn’t going to pay up, and the billionaires have at their fingertips staffs of CPAs and off-shore trusts — minimum investment $500,000 — where they can minimize taxes and run their estates like corporations. Look at corporations like Facebook, Wells Fargo, and General Electric who apparently pay no taxes.

Another plus for us: those $300K to $5 million a year wage earners moving to Texas also buy houses, often plural. I’m hearing now that US Air execs are starting to house hunt in Dallas, moving here from Phoenix.

Kotkin says that last year, all ten of the leading states gaining domestic migrants were low-tax states, including five with no income tax: Texas, Florida, Tennessee, Washington and Nevada. The highest rates of outward-bound migration came from New Jersey, New York, Illinois and California. That will leave those states with fewer to support the tax raises and pension benefit increasing they are enacting — which may act as a fiscal band aid at first, the “fiscal crack”, as revenues increase and the economy appears to recover.

But then, slowly, the $300K to $5M a year worker bees say we’ve had enough, see ya’, wouldn’t want to be ya, and they come to Texas.

Dare I say it — after all I’m a transplant, too, from Illinois, though I got here as quick as I could: tell these immigrants they are welcome, but leave their higher tax and social spending mentalities back in their previous home.

 

We like kids, right? Sure we do. Well, we have a lot of them in Dallas/Fort Worth. It’s a good sign when you have a lot of families with little ones visiting Santa and outgrowing their tennies because that means mom and dad will have to buy more. And families need homes to raise the kids, preferably with leafy back-yards and if we go upscale, pools. (And if we go nuts, never mind.) Demographers, investors, businesses and even politicians love kids because they indicate a strong future and growth from all that spending. Now Joel Kotkin tells us some interesting things about the kids in this country: there are way more in some parts, way fewer in others. That has major implications for the future: cities who are losing children tend to be those with impossible home prices. And regions who are getting the kids tend to be those with affordable homes, like us. In fact,  Texas is right up there tip top of the 31 metro areas where youth population expanded significantly from 2000 to 2010:

The 10 regions that posted the strongest growth were in Texas, the Southeast and the Intermountain West. Leading the nation is Raleigh, N.C., where the number of children under 15 rose a whopping 45%, or 77,421. Texas is experiencing something of a baby boom, paced by Austin, second among America’s largest metro areas with a youth population expansion of 38%; Dallas-Ft. Worth (sixth); Houston (eighth); and San Antonio (11th).

New York City, says Kotkin,  has lost about as many children as Dallas-Ft. Worth has gained — a difference of a half million. Even cities known to me as retirement centers when I was growing up,  Las Vegas and Phoenix are attracting families, as are Riverside-San Bernardino, Calif., Salt Lake City and Oklahoma City. Families also like Indianapolis and Columbus, Ohio. The deal is that places like New York, LA and Chicago are losing families by the carloads because of — you guessed it — housing. No one seems to be having babies in NY, NJ and Pa. and San Francisco is almost, says Kotkin, a child-free city: only 11.2% of the population is under age 15. And despite what you hear about “the return of families to the city”, it isn’t really happening when the costs of urban living would crowd a family of four into 1200 square feet for several thousand dollars a month in rent. Most families still go far out to suburbia to find the most house for their money.

According to a study by Pitney-Bowes, Dallas/Plano/Irving is projected to have a 5.2% increase in our population by 2017. So the next time I see some little ones playing around or jumping up in a restaurant, I will smile at them because they are a sign of strength in our economy. Who knows, maybe I ought to start carrying animal crackers again in my purse!

 

Top 50 Metro Areas for Projected Absolute Growth
CBSA Title Households in 2012 Projected Households in 2017 Projected absolute change 2012-2017 Projected percent change 2012-2017
1 Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX 2,111,564 2,252,126 140,562 6.7%
2 Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA 1,969,898 2,075,415 105,517 5.4%
3 Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV (Metro Division) 1,662,591 1,746,167 83,576 5.0%
4 Dallas-Plano-Irving, TX (Metro Division) 1,553,474 1,633,725 80,251 5.2%
5 New York-White Plains-Wayne, NY-NJ (Metro Division) 4,371,918 4,446,949 75,031 1.7%
6 Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale, AZ 1,561,910 1,634,548 72,638 4.7%
7 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA 1,312,345 1,376,890 64,545 4.9%
8 San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX 776,007 831,024 55,017 7.1%
9 Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos, TX 667,168 716,242 49,074 7.4%
10 Fort Worth-Arlington, TX (Metro Division) 785,628 833,991 48,363 6.2%
11 San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA 1,090,335 1,138,248 47,913 4.4%
12 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, CA (Metro Division) 3,221,066 3,268,050 46,984 1.5%
13 Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL 805,796 850,864 45,068 5.6%
14 Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, NC-SC 683,543 728,538 44,995 6.6%
15 Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO 1,015,569 1,056,744 41,175 4.1%
16 Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, WA (Metro Division) 1,068,504 1,108,711 40,207 3.8%
17 Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL 1,161,658 1,199,024 37,366 3.2%
18 Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI 1,284,894 1,320,378 35,484 2.8%
19 Jacksonville, FL 533,509 568,859 35,350 6.6%
20 Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville, CA 791,879 826,965 35,086 4.4%
21 Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA 873,480 907,740 34,260 3.9%
22 Chicago-Joliet-Naperville, IL (Metro Division) 2,877,909 2,911,447 33,538 1.2%
23 Las Vegas-Paradise, NV 711,976 745,470 33,494 4.7%
24 Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN 624,014 657,493 33,479 5.4%
25 Raleigh-Cary, NC 441,202 472,777 31,575 7.2%
26 Philadelphia, PA (Metro Division) 1,538,067 1,569,463 31,396 2.0%
27 Oakland-Fremont-Hayward, CA (Metro Division) 928,246 958,795 30,549 3.3%
28 Miami-Miami Beach-Kendall, FL (Metro Division) 882,802 910,348 27,546 3.1%
29 Indianapolis-Carmel, IN 685,856 713,179 27,323 4.0%
30 Columbus, OH 734,318 761,146 26,828 3.7%
31 Boston-Quincy, MA (Metro Division) 737,964 761,547 23,583 3.2%
32 Richmond, VA 494,986 518,334 23,348 4.7%
33 Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC 636,585 659,234 22,649 3.6%
34 Kansas City, MO-KS 803,153 825,336 22,183 2.8%
35 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 623,830 644,782 20,952 3.4%
36 Baltimore-Towson, MD 1,041,128 1,061,847 20,719 2.0%
37 West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Boynton Beach, FL (Metro Division) 546,085 566,635 20,550 3.8%
38 Oklahoma City, OK 497,699 517,847 20,148 4.0%
39 Edison-New Brunswick, NJ (Metro Division) 860,340 880,060 19,720 2.3%
40 Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, CA (Metro Division) 996,584 1,015,868 19,284 1.9%
41 Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN 840,122 859,034 18,912 2.3%
42 St. Louis, MO-IL 1,119,596 1,138,367 18,771 1.7%
43 Columbia, SC 298,557 316,723 18,166 6.1%
44 Tucson, AZ 386,434 403,932 17,498 4.5%
45 Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN 518,480 535,763 17,283 3.3%
46 Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach-Deerfield Beach, FL (Metro Division) 696,388 712,878 16,490 2.4%
47 Bakersfield-Delano, CA 255,261 271,724 16,463 6.4%
48 Salt Lake City, UT 377,450 393,567 16,117 4.3%
49 Colorado Springs, CO 248,724 264,183 15,459 6.2%
50 Cape Coral-Fort Myers, FL 262,941 278,347 15,406 5.9%

 

I love this post on Huffington Post by Anna Clark, who also writes for Joel Kotkin, and who I totally need to re-connect with.

Anna is the Green Queen of not just Dallas, but Texas. In her op-ed piece for The Huffington Post, she writes that while the Dallas series may portray as as the center of oil gushers and relentless consumerism, we are actually one of the biggest leaders in creating and producing renewable energy. To whit, I did not know this:

” Half Price Books was the first to install a public electric vehicle charging station in its parking lot, and energy retailer TXU recently unveiled two more chargers at Dallas City Hall. Houston-based eVgo, partnering with national retailers such as Walgreens and Cracker Barrel, has also installed six Freedom Stations in the region, some of which include level three chargers, giving EV drivers up to 50 miles in 15 minutes. Such companies are helping us adjust to the transition to electrification and other 21st century technologies.”

Some of the other things Anna brings to light on her site/blog never make it into the narcissistic main-stream media. (Shocker.) I know T. Boone Pickens is spearheading legislation to transition hauling trucks to natural gas, a cleaner burning and necessary, if controversial, domestic energy source. Course, he’s in the biz and the media says he has a vested interest, which he does, but if that vested interest gets us off fossil fuels, what’s wrong with that? I have a vested interest in this blog! She also tells us about Elizabeth Dry, a public school teacher who launched the Promise of Peace Garden, and Jeanne McCarthy, who leads the non-profit Real School Gardens.

“Both these leaders are introducing community gardens to impoverished children in North Texas.”

I am kind of tired of everyone thinking that just because we like our Jimmy Choos and Loubies, and we drive to our homes in the suburbs, we are not green. One of my biggest pet peeves is my beloved New York City where density rules. Yes, everyone lives on top of one another and you don’t need a car in New York City. You can WALK, and boy do I when there. But New Yorkers create so much garbage! They use take-out containers for everything; plastic containers by the boatload. Recycle it, sure, but can it really be used again?  Who can dry clothes outside on a line in New York City? It’s a totally disposal environment.

Anyhoo, if you haven’t, check out Anna’s great blog. I am so re-connecting with her — in a New York minute! Oh and check out her book: Green, American Style.

I guess what I like about demographer, futurist and urban observer Joel Kotkin is that he is upbeat about both America and Texas, and he shares my gut common sense instinct that most people, families, want to live in homes, not a bunch of scrunched-together apartments. (So why are we building so many in Dallas???) He is practical in his thinking that Americans will always have a love affair with their autos, and that we will have most of our growth in suburban towns, where families will find safe, affordable housing and decent public education for their kids. Yesterday, I learned of an amazing new master-planned development you will be hearing a lot of on this blog, Phillips Creek Ranch by Republic Property Group, in Frisco: unbelievable $350K homes with a million dollar plus lifestyle of clubs, pools, hike and bike, and fabulous schools. Then there’s Emerald Sound. I think, like Joel does, that growth will be in the suburban areas — you cannot deny it. Take a stroll in your car down Geo W Bush and tell me he’s wrong. We will drive and park — to mini-cities — from suburban town to suburban town. That’s why I am so excited by what Scott Beck plans do do with Valley View Mall.

Kotkin is in Fort Worth today, the keynote speaker at the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce’s sold-out 130th annual meeting at the Worthington Renaissance Hotel. I so owe him about ten stories.

“My sense is that the country’s economic center is moving back into the central point of the country. And within the central part of the country, the center of gravity has moved from Chicago to Fort Worth and Houston,” he has said.

Whoa? What about Dallas? I have written for Kotkin, and spent time with him and his lovely wife in LA. I know he is not super keen on Dallas, thinks we are a bit stuffy. But he still thinks we are doing something so right here:

“Really, I think if you want to see what American cities are going to evolve into, probably the place to go is Texas,” said Kotkin, whose annual analysis of the best cities for jobs is routinely topped by the Lone Star State’s five metropolitan areas.

A NewGeography.com analysis of job growth from 2002 to 2012 of the metropolitan areas with populations of at least 2.5 million shows Houston leads the way at 16.2 percent, followed by Washington (10.9 percent), Phoenix (10.2 percent) and Dallas-Fort Worth (9.1 percent). We know all about our state and energy. Washington will always do well because of what goes on there — politics. Phoenix surprises me because I cannot for the life of me see much job creation there — besides maintaining golf courses.

Joel Kotkin’s view of the nuevo America:

“Our experiment with creating what Walt Whitman described as ‘the race of races’ will continue to evolve. By midcentury the United States will be a ‘white country’ no longer but rather a staggering amalgam of racial, ethnic, and religious groups, all participants in the construction of a new civilization whose roots lie not in any one country or continent but across the entirety of human cultures and racial types. No other advanced, populous country will enjoy such ethnic diversity,” Kotkin writes in his book, The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050.

All those people will require housing, of course. What they will leave behind (or how they will shed those homes in other states), is an unanswered question that intrigues me. While Kotkin does think we will rebuilt and in-fill in large cities, that will be done by those with higher net worth. The middle class surge will be in the Heartland, where there’s ample room for the creation of new suburban towns and not so many pesky rules and regs. Kotkin is the first to tell you point by point how California, his home state, has shot itself economically with over-regulation.

Here’s what he writes about Tejas:

“The land is cheap and the NIMBY (not in my back yard) culture is not there. And you don’t have the ‘smart growth’ people who think everyone should live in an apartment.”

Yeah!

 

Joel Kotkin, the provocative urbanist and Forbes contributor whose latest book is The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050, is so right on the ball. Contrary to the elitists’ proclamation that all of us should ditch our autos and be crammed into an “urban core,” Joel thinks suburbia is not all that bad and is, actually, rather a pretty good place for families to live and thrive. Sure there’s a place for urban cores,¬† but they are increasingly becoming havens for the uber rich. San Francisco, for example, has the highest percentage of individuals living on unearned incomes! (I call these folks children of the Golden or Lucky Sperm Club. Of course,¬† many of them may have made a killing in the market and are living off the interest.) The outlying, auto-dependent areas where land and affordable housing is available is where most people settle. Also out there: jobs for the real people who keep the cogs turning. That’s what stimulates ‚Äúupward mobility‚Äù among the lower and middle classes, keeps our economy humming, and ultimately funnels more Lucky Sperm Club folks to San Francisco.¬† Joel’s latest Forbes.com column focuses on the 2010 Census and what it showed — and he was right on the money, honey. Americans are continuing to “disperse, becoming more ethnically diverse as I pointed out in NG and leaning toward to what might be called ‚Äúopportunity‚Äù regions of the nation.” That is, suburbs. In Texas!

I visited Joel and his precious wife, Mandy, at their home in December. They have a charming house in a beautiful, leafy part of the city known as Valley Village; their lot is generous and dotted with colorful citrus trees. A neighbor is Isaiah Washington, who played Dr. Preston¬† Burke on Grey’s Anatomy. Like all of us, the Kotkins keep track of home values in their ‘hood and track nearby celebrity homes:

“They are always doing something, working on that house,” Joel told me of the Washington home down the street.

Homes in Valley Village range from the $300’s to well over $2,650,000. But of course: this is Los Angeles. We spent a lot of time talking about what the Texas equivalent of the Kotkin home would look like — but I don’t think Mandy is ready to move out of Cali yet, though we both think the Lone Star state should give Joel an honorary home.

Maybe he could win this 2,900 square ft, four bedroom, three baths, gourmet kitchen and study area home by Darling Homes in Prosper, a Texas suburb growing like weeds! Hardwoods in the entry, kitchen, nook and family room, and many upgrades including landscaping, stereo system, and even Epoxy Paint Coating on the garage floor! Best of all, this home is practically FREE. That’s right. Darling homes has donated this $370,000 valued home in the country-like setting of Prosper in Whitley Place to benefit ManeGait, a non-profit therapeutic horseback riding center situated on a beautiful, rolling 14-acre site in Collin County, the fastest growing area of the DFW Metroplex. Founded by business and community leaders Bill and Priscilla Darling, ManeGait delivers the best in equine therapy in a caring, high-integrity environment.

More beating on surfin’ dudesville. Joel Kotkin, who was in Dallas last Friday, is on his Texas kick again and I just love it. In fact, I’ve offered to help him find a house in Texas and just move in. This time he’s talking about the political and social and plain insane suicide Californians dealt themselves in the recent election: Jerry Brown, Gavin Newsom. Because California, God love her, is already in a pickle and Kotkin thinks the new sheriffs will only make it worse:

Instead of a role model, California  has become a cautionary tale of mismanagement of what by all rights should be the country’s most prosperous big state. Its poverty rate is at least two points above the national average; its unemployment rate nearly three points above the national average.  On Friday Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger was forced yet again to call an emergency session in order to deal with the state’s enormous budget problems.

The proof of the pudding is in economic performance. Since 1998, according to economist John Husing, the California economy has not produced a single new net job. As Kotkin says,  public employment has swelled, but private jobs have declined.  I love this: as Texas grew its middle-income jobs by 16%, one of the highest rates in the nation, California, at 2.1% growth, ranked near the bottom. He says Texas accounted for roughly half of all the new jobs created in the country.

Yeah, we have our problems, and we need to look west to see how NOT to solve them. Do we really need more regulation on HOA’s that will drive up the cost of housing? And we need to totally get our property taxes under control.

I guess California, as much as I love her, might not be the best place for a second home after all… or any home!

STEM: Science,technology, engineering and math jobs.