new hampshireOnce a stagecoach stop between Concord, New Hampshire, and Hanover, Mink Pond Farm has a rich history of making travelers feel welcome — and as the current owners list the house, they think the next owners could return the spacious home to its original, hospitable roots.

Built in 1850 in Wilmot, New Hampshire, the home has maintained its period charm while still offering all the upgrades of 21st-century living.

Nestled on more than 8 acres of land, the 4,235 square foot home has six bedrooms, four-and-a-half baths and a perfect setup for a future B&B or Airbnb business. (more…)

The Isaac Heffron House, a two-story Victorian in the East End Historic District of Galveston, has seen a lot since it was built in 1890 — thanks in part to the occupants who called it home over the years.

Isaac Heffron immigrated to the U.S. from Wales and settled in Galveston in 1860. He worked on the docks, making his way eventually to a career in construction, winning bids with the city of Galveston for a railroad and trestle bridge that connected the city to LaPorte. (more…)

Craig Ellwood wasn’t always Craig Ellwood, but the Clarendon, Texas, native became renown under that moniker as he made a name as a premiere modernist architect. His homes, often considered works of art (and rightly so), are perfect blends of spare, midcentury German Bauhaus architecture and the more informal California sensibilities of the state he called home longer than the Lone Star State.

Born John Burke in 1922, his family left Texas and found themselves in Los Angeles by the mid-1930s. After joining the Army Air Corps in the forties, he, his brother, and two friends set up shop as contractors under the name Craig Ellwood. Not long after, Burke changed his name to Craig Ellwood, and began night classes in structural engineering.

He opened his own firm, and began to make a name for himself. Despite never having a license as an architect, he was a sought-after guest lecturer and continued to create residential and commercial masterpieces until he closed his shop in 1977 and moved to Italy. He died in 1992.

One of those masterpieces is The Smith House in Los Angeles. Built in 1958, it was restored this year under American Institute of Architects fellow (and former Ellwood associate) Jim Tyler’s guidance. It is now on the market, and we have the details on SecondShelters.com.

For $350,000 and some elbow grease, someone is going to snag this bed-and-breakfast ready historical shelter on the way to Toledo Bend Lake in Shelbyville, Texas. It’s just a matter of when, and who, not if.

The Bickham House, built in the 1880s, is located at 794 FM 2694 and is a 4,232 square foot farmhouse with five cottages, a prayer room, and an old drugstore, all sitting on 42 acres of East Texas land. In between the town proper and Toledo Bend Lake (and less than 10 minutes from the lake), it would make a great spot to open a B-and-B for people that enjoy lake life and fishing, especially when you factor in the three-story farmhouse and five cottages that give you 13 bedrooms and 13 bathrooms.

We have more on SecondShelters.com.

 

If you’ve spent any time in Arkansas the name E. Fay Jones is probably one of the first names to come to mind when someone mentions midcentury modern homes.

In fact, we may have mentioned him once before.

If you’re new to Jones’ work, the clean lines and use of natural materials will likely remind you of Frank Lloyd Wright — with good reason. Jones was an apprentice to Wright, and in fact was the only Wright apprentice to receive the American Institute of Architects Gold Medal.

Needless to say, owning a Jones-designed home is a get. And for the first time ever, Jones’ most recognized residential design — The Butterfly House — is for sale. We have the details over on SecondShelters.com.

Fans of southern gothic novelist Anne Rice know that New Orleans is prime territory if you’re looking for settings from some of her most famous books. But one of her abodes (she’s had a few) in New Orleans is now up for sale, again.

Located at 3711 St. Charles in Uptown New Orleans, the mansion was sold by Rice to new owners in 2011 (the list price was $3.19 million).

It is said that one of the families from her fictional Mayfair series “lived” at this home,  which Rice bought while she was writing “Lasher.”

We have more about the house (including links and photos), here.

When Robert Lee Warren built his Colonial Revival-Prairie School style mansion in 1897, Terrell, Texas, was about 24 years old, having taken root like so many towns in Texas did — along a railroad line.

Although settlers first arrived in the area in the 1840s, it was the Texas and Pacific Railway’s march across North Texas that attracted interest in the town.  C. C. Nash and John G. Moore bought the tracts and planned the town that would flourish during the heyday of rail travel, and Warren would come a couple dozen years later to build his mansion, complete with a special room in the master suite that allowed him to watch his farm wake up every morning, right after he woke up.

Now, after a massive renovation spanning three years, the home is on the market. We have details on SecondShelters.com.

It’s not often that you can find a property with the kind of income potential this week’s historical shelter has for less than $1 million.

But this six bedroom, four-and-a-half-bath colonial revival home in Cape Charles, Virginia, has been lovingly restored and renovated, and also had an addition to accommodate the history of the home (indeed, it pre-dates the town’s founding by almost 60 years) and the modern needs for more living space and amenities.

We have the details at SecondShelters.com.