Historic Talbott-Wall home as it sits on 1102 Samuels Avenue. (Photos: AP Real Estate Photography)

Imagine Fort Worth in 1903.  From grainy photos I’ve seen, there was a lot of dust, cows, and not much else.  There certainly were not any charming homes that would last 114 years and become historic properties, right?  Wrong.

The 1900 census of Fort Worth showed 26,668 residents, which was up from 1880 when there were 6,663 people living in Cowtown.  The largest building in 1903 was a seven-story building that cost $400,000 to construct. Cowtown in 1903 was a “rail town” — cattle drives and meat packing were the main industry before World War I, World War II, and the oil boom.

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One doesn’t want to be parochial, but one can’t fail to take an interest in the goings on on one’s own street. Move-in ready isn’t a term necessarily associated with Elizabeth Blvd., but since its listing on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979, the area has been undergoing a steady process of re-gentrification.

Exterior modifications are verboten. However interiors are fair game for updates. Whether or not that’s a good thing naturally depends on the taste of the owner. Happily, 1107 Elizabeth Blvd. couldn’t have been more fortunate in its present owners, who have modernized the 3,718-square-foot, 1919 house with taste and flair.

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2524 Rogers Front

In the $400K to $500K range, there’s a lot of new construction in Fort Worth. And while a new home is good every once in a while, seeing the same granite and stainless kitchen can be a little bit boring. Nothing against Fort Worth: I love the city and it’s awesome south side and the TCU area is just booming with cool homes and great little pockets of businesses. But I am always on the lookout for interesting, unique homes with a combination of character and amenities.

And in my search, I found this adorable home with incredible curb appeal and a fantastic backyard. And it’s close to TCU!

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