We are nowhere

Last night, TXDoT conducted their first community meeting as they explore what to do with I-345 – the highway at the eastern edge of downtown that connects I-45 and US-75. I’d guestimate some 250 people trekked to the St. Philip’s School and Community Center in Southern Dallas, and  I’d bet all of them were disappointed.

When I saw TXDoT was going to have five meetings – one north, one south, and three downtown – I thought I’d attend a few of them to see if the audience’s reactions changed based on location. I liked the potential for nuance, but I found that short of looking over someone’s shoulder while they filled in a survey, that goal was impossible. This made it pointless for me to attend more of the meetings.

The reason you shouldn’t go is that there’s nothing new to learn – not a scintilla. CandysDirt.com publisher Candy Evans and I have been writing about this since 2014 (here, here, here, here, here, and here). If you’ve read any of these articles, count yourself up to speed.

The purpose of the meetings appears to be two-fold – pretend all this hasn’t been said before and most importantly to get attendees to fill out a survey (which I encourage you to do in your fuzzy slippers online and save yourself the tedium – www.345study.com).

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Rhonda Seacat Hunnicutt organizes pre-demo sales for a living. She works with high-end builders and always sees the gorgeous post-demo results. This means she also gets to see the latest design trends in each of these homes and she’s not above borrowing a little from the pros.

Of course, she’s a pro herself. She remodels homes and condos and just happens to be the brilliant brain behind this Bryan Place condo at 3105 San Jacinto, #317.

This particular unit sits on the third floor of a building with easy access to Downtown Dallas and *ahem* Uber’s new headquarters. It was one of the first buildings to go up in the area back in the day so it’s been a trendsetter from the very beginning.

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Museum Tower

There’s a lot to be said for living downtown — especially in a property like the Museum Tower. Views for days, the convenience of being right in the middle of everything, and incredible amenities have made the tower one of the premier places to nest in Dallas.

So when we saw a unit available to lease, and on such a great perch as the 36th floor, we decided it was this week’s Luxury Lease, hands down. (more…)

Diving into downtown Dallas area living? Then be sure to catch these three open houses. Two are open this weekend. Another is open in July. But it’s a stylish steal that’s sure to go quick, so we are giving you a heads up! Each of these open houses offers great floor plans and bright interiors at a variety of price points. Enjoy! The neighborhoods of downtown Dallas never looked so good.

Sensible Skyrise

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SoCoIf you’ve been looking for something with some stellar views of Dallas and some pretty sweet amenities, this week’s Tuesday Two Hundred at the SoCo Lofts is probably going to do the trick.

Unfamiliar with the lofts at 1122 Jackson Street? We wrote about them several years ago, but a quick primer: Constructed in 1926 by Lloyd Whitson and F. Cowderie Dale, it was at one time part of a four-building complex of warehouses for the Gulf, Colorado, and Santa Fe Railroad. Underground tunnels connected the buildings and also allowed trains to enter. Building 3 was demolished eventually, but 1, 2, and 4 remained.

The SoCo Lofts are Building 2, which in previous lives housed the University Club (in the two-story penthouse until the late 30s), WFAA Radio (from the 30s on), and the Garment Center. The building sat vacant by the 80s, and a demo order was issued in 1987, but by 1988, it and building 1 were named Dallas landmarks. By 1997, it was on the National Register of Historic Places. (more…)

Klyde Warren Park

Dallas’ landscape is crisscrossed with interstate highways that cut through and divide our city’s neighborhoods. The lasting effects of these high-speed thoroughfares on our city have been felt for years, but until recently, the only option was to grin and bear it. With an acute lack of will to remove them, urban planners had to come up with a solution for restoring the connection between neighborhoods. The answer: deck parks and connective parks.

Our first in North Texas was Klyde Warren Park, and our city can’t imagine what life would be like without the deck park that connects Uptown to downtown Dallas. And the city is planning a second deck park over Interstate 35 near Highway 67  to connect North Oak Cliff to the Dallas Zoo, though that project wasn’t without contention. Even Plano is getting on board with deck parks, with plans in the works for a park over the Dallas North Tollway that would connect the Shops at Legacy with Legacy West.

To further explore this growing trend, the Dallas Architecture Forum is hosting a panel discussion called “Deck Parks and Connective Parks in Dallas” moderated by Elissa Izmailyan, senior director for community and economic development for the Trinity Park Conservancy. The panel will feature Tara Green, past president of Klyde Warren Park and principal of OJB Landscape Architecture; Diane Jones Allen, director of Landscape Architecture at UTA, CAPPA; and Molly Plummer, Parks for People Program Manager for the Trust for Public Land in North Texas.

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Elm StreetSometimes in the course of finding homes to feature through the week, we end up traveling down a bit of a wormhole when the abode’s history comes up. But our trip to the past for the history of this historic downtown Dallas loft was the unusual for a Tuesday Two Hundred.

We first found this unit in 509 Elm Street and fell in love with all the touches that make a loft condo charming — the exposed brick and beams, the concrete floors, the tons of light.

But when you know a building is likely historic, it almost behooves you to go look up what you can about that history — so we did just that.

Although the listing says it was built in 1930, other sourcing has its build date as 1901, 1906, and 1925.

Illustration from Dallas Chamber of Commerce magazine.
Source: Dallas, April 1925. (Courtesy Dallas Public Library archives)

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Our Splurge: Amy Hunniford with Rogers Healy and Associates has listed 6058 Kenwood Avenue for $749,900.

Tis the season to gather round the fireplace, so we found two Dallas beauties to make Santa proud. Hang those stockings, and get ready for visions of sugarplums to dance in your heads. This week, we highlight two Dallas offerings — one in Lakewood and one in downtown Dallas — that will have you doing just that, each with cozy fireplaces and ample space to entertain, but with price points that are miles apart.

Which would you choose in our latest Splurge vs. Steal, the Lower Greenville splurge or the McKinnon Street steal? Either way you’ll have a home for the holidays worth celebrating about.

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