2328 W. Colorado Blvd. Circa 1941

Stevens Park Village may be nestled off-the-beaten-path between Colorado Boulevard and the edge of North Oak Cliff, but the amazing Dallas skyline is in plain sight from hilltops in the hidden neighborhood. That’s one of the many advantages that villagers enjoy.

The location, just a stone’s throw from Interstate 30 and downtown, is another one. Residents have easy access to the central business district, urban sprawl, and all-things Dallas along with the comfort of coming home to a quiet neighborhood with plenty of village feel.

2107 Barberry Drive Circa 1941

Unlike some historic North Oak Cliff neighborhoods that date back to the 19th century, Stevens Park Village is more of a vintage village. While homes on five of its streets were constructed from 1939 to 1941, houses on the remaining three streets are Midcentury architecture straight out of the 1950s.

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7110 Cliffdale Avenue

If you aren’t familiar with the El Tivoli Place neighborhood, you’re not alone. Touted as a hidden North Oak Cliff treasure, the neighborhood epitomizes the saying that “big things come in small packages.”

El Tivoli Place is big on beauty, charm, life, and style. Despite its proximity to downtown Dallas, the neighborhood maintains a quiet, serene vibe characterized by rolling hills, creeks, winding streets, and old-growth trees. And the history of El Tivoli Place is every bit as colorful as the tapestry of native spring flowers growing throughout the area.

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Kessler Park

Photos courtesy East Kessler Park Neighborhood Association

By Deb R. Brimer
Contributing Writer

East Kessler Park is a breathtaking mix of storied historic homes and natural beauty. The neighborhood not only contains the largest collection of eclectic architecture within the city of Dallas, its residential patriarch The Rock Lodge – is among the oldest masonry structures in Dallas County.

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wrong

Recognize this hotbed of danger in Northwest Dallas?

So, dear readers, remember that time when I had to tell that writer from the Atlantic decided to talk about the dining options in Dallas suburbs, while only actually spending most of her time in Wichita Falls and the airport that she was super wrong?

That hot sports opinion is about to look remarkably measured and well researched. Hold my prosecco, y’all.

Last week, someone slid a year-old piece of aggression across my metaphorical desk, and I decided to ask some readers what they thought.

They had many thoughts. I had many thoughts. At the end of this piece, you can share your thoughts.

So there is this site called Roadsnacks. According to their flagship site’s about us page:

“HomeSnacks combines recent data from the Census, FBI, OpenStreetMaps, and dozens of other sources into bite-sized studies to help you understand what it’s like to live in different communities across the country.
We have been professionally ranking cities, neighborhoods, counties, and states across America for over three years.”

They’re based in Durham, North Carolina, which is super close to Dallas when you’re dead set on being wrong on the Internet. (more…)

grantFind out how your neighborhood can apply for a vitality grant, and find out what North Texas city tops the list when it comes to annoying neighbors in this week’s roundup of real estate news.

CITY TO HOLD GRANT WORKSHOPS

The City of Dallas will hold workshop sessions to assist neighborhood organizations who wish to apply for a Dallas Neighborhood Vitality Grant, it was announced last week.

The grant was created to help neighborhood groups find and grow projects that address a specific need in the neighborhood, while also increasing the cohesiveness of it and neighborhood pride.

“Projects must serve a public purpose and provide community benefits by promoting the creation of strong, safe, and vibrant neighborhoods,” the city explained of the grant, which is a reboot of the growSouth Neighborhood Challenge Grant. (more…)

8623 San Leandro Front

This is one of those new builds in Little Forest Hills that really does uphold the neighborhood motto: “Keep Little Forest Hills Funky.” This enclave of 1930s and ’40s cottages east of Garland Road and west of Ferguson has been a target for teardowns, with many homes being scraped and replaced as fast as builders can manage it. So it’s refreshing to see a new build that looks just as fun and friendly as the neighbors.

Considering this hot market for homebuyers inside 635, we’re pretty sure this listing from David Griffin Realtor Janelle Alcantara will get snapped up fast! If you want to put in your highest and best offer and get first dibs on this cute contemporary home, call Lisa Peters of Caliber Home Loans today. From pre-approval to closing, no one is more prepared to deal with anything that might come up in the home-buying process. Don’t waste your time, call Lisa Peters at Caliber Home Loans today.

For fun finish-out and wide-open spaces, jump to see this Little Forest Hills home’s interiors.

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City Council 2

In what I expect was a piece of theater, last night, the Dallas City Council trucked over to Fair Park to meet with the people in an open-door session. The goal was for citizens to voice their opinions about the Fair Park task force’s plans. As one black community leader pointed out, a two-hour session with the neighborhood after a year of work by a largely secretive task force was “a slap in the face.”

Before I continue, I ended my last piece on Fair Park wondering how much rent the city was generating from the State Fair.

In 2013 (the most recent financial statements I could find), the State Fair generated $42,411,006 in revenues (up $4.5-million from 2012) and paid the city $1,784,185 in rent for its 3.5 month lease of Fair Park. That would place an annual rental value on Fair Park of $5,947,283 or just $1,789 per acre per month. Does that seem a terrifically low price for a National Register property?

Put in perspective, the nonprofit State Fair pays its top nine executives just over $3 million in salaries and perks, not quite double what they pay the entire city of Dallas. Also keep in mind, for $1,789 a month you could either rent a 917 square foot, 1-bedroom apartment in West Village or an ACRE at Fair Park with all its accompanying historical buildings. How’s that for perspective?

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Zip Code 75235

West Love: Inwood, Harry Hines and Denton Drive

Let’s get our noses out of house porn for a minute to wander through an up and coming neighborhood. DCAD calls it Lovedale 2 (or unappetizingly Slaughters Brookdale), but as far as I know, it has no fancy name to woo buyers to its hipness. It’s pre-hip. If other hip locales cool, maybe this area becomes a hip replacement (boooo, bad pun, bad Jon).

I’ll call it West Love Field or West Love … hmmm, I like that … West Love … and homes are selling FAST! In the hours it took to write this, two of the properties featured below went under contract.

East of Love Field has been in full-on gentrification mode for a while now, only pausing for the recession (as did we all), but West Love hasn’t really gotten any lovin’. It’s loosely bounded by Denton Drive, Harry Hines and Inwood. There are plenty of warehouses on Denton Drive, but there are also a lot of smaller cute starter homes that are a hop from downtown, UTSW and the monkeyshines of the Gayborhood … oh, and Love Field. Perfect for medical folks or air mattresses, trolley dollies in-flight personnel.

Speaking of the airport … I said, SPEAKING OF THE AIRPORT … Oaklawnians have lived cheek by jowl with Love Field since the beginning (well, since 1917 when it opened as an army pilot training facility). The “Oaklawn Pause” is what happens when a plane flies over during a conversation; it pauses. Homes east and west of Love Field are somewhat better off. Planes take-off and land from the north-south, meaning these east and west areas are not being directly flown over – but what a cool place for a roof deck.

For many years when homes hit the market, they were in somewhat calamitous condition. That’s changing, but things are still wonderfully affordable here and sure to rise. How wonderfully affordable? Try $125,000 to $135,000 for 1,100 to 2,031 square feet, many on pretty sizeable lots 50-foot lots!

Here’s a smattering of what’s available and going gone fast.

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