It was contentious, a lot. In fact, at one point almost anyone remotely affiliated with a Scott Griggs supporter was blocked by mayoral candidate Eric Johnson on social media. But in the end, he not only unblocked everyone, according to his campaign, but he also won a fairly combative race to become Dallas’ next mayor.

Johnson beat Griggs 55 percent to 44 percent.

Click on map to see larger version.

The tone Johnson took Saturday night was much lighter as he spoke to supporters after Griggs conceded. 

After making his way to the stage and hugging his wife, Johnson took a deep breath.

“This is one of those moments that you think you’re prepared for, but you’re just never prepared for something like this,” he said, going on to thank Griggs for his years of service to the city. (more…)

District 7Dallas City Council District 7 turned out to be one of the more notable races in the municipal election last month — the incumbent, Kevin Felder, garnered a distant fourth place in a crowded field of candidates.

But that doesn’t mean that there are two complete unknowns vying for the D7 seat, however. Tiffinni Young has spent time on the horseshoe before, having been elected in 2015 and losing her re-election campaign in the runoff election on June 10, 2017.

Her opponent, a high school teacher Adam Bazaldua, is a known quantity in the district as well, having served on several community groups and task forces.

At the end of election night, Bazaldua had 23 percent of the vote, and Young pulled in 22.17 percent.  All told, there were six races (five city and one Dallas ISD school board race) where none of the candidates reached the 50 percent threshold required to win outright, kicking off an extended election season that will culminate with a runoff election on June 8.

We solicited questions from readers and voters to craft a comprehensive questionnaire for each individual race. However, only Bazaldua returned his questionnaire — we reached out via email and social media to Young’s campaign and had no response.

We have Bazaldua’s responses in full below, but here are some highlights: (more…)

District 9

When it comes to city council races, politics play a big part in the health of Dallas — and therefore the health of the real estate market.

After the May 4 election, there were six races (five city and one Dallas ISD school board race) where none of the candidates reached the 50 percent threshold required to win outright, kicking off an extended election season that will culminate with a runoff election on June 8.

The race for Mark Clayton’s District 9 seat will also be settled this Saturday in a runoff election, with Paula Blackmon getting 36.86 percent of the vote, and Erin Moore getting 31.82 percent in the general election held in May.

We solicited questions from readers and voters to craft a comprehensive questionnaire for each individual race. Both Blackmon and Moore have answered our questionnaire, and some of their responses follow. Their full responses are at the end of this story. (more…)

candidates

Whether it’s city or school board candidates, politics play a big part in the health of Dallas — and therefore the health of the real estate market.

After the May 4 election, there were six races (five city and one Dallas ISD school board race) where none of the candidates reached the 50 percent threshold required to win outright, kicking off an extended election season that will culminate with a runoff election on June 8.

One such race was in District 14 race, where David Blewett blew past incumbent Philip Kingston in early voting and ended up with 47.63 percent of the vote to Kingston’s 40.38 percent by the end of the night.

We solicited questions from readers and voters to craft a comprehensive questionnaire for each individual race. Both Kingston and Blewett have answered our questionnaire, and some of their responses follow. Their full responses are at the end of this story. (more…)

election

Dallas mayoral candidates Scott Griggs (left) and Eric Johnson (right) will face off in a runoff election in June.

With nine candidates vying to become the next mayor of Dallas, it was a foregone conclusion that there would be a runoff. But that doesn’t mean election night wasn’t without its surprises.

Early on, despite the crowded field, Johnson and Griggs stayed ahead of the field, with Johnson maintaining about 20 percent of the vote, and Griggs hovering between 17 and 18 percent. Mike Ablon and Lynn McBee remained clustered around the 14 percent mark for much of the night, rounding out the top four contenders.

At a watch party, a smiling Johnson told supporters that he and wife Tanika were on their way home to see their children, because tomorrow “starts the first day of the new campaign.” (more…)

debate

Incumbent District 13 Dallas councilmember Jennifer Staubach Gates (center) debated former mayor Laura Miller (far right) Thursday. The Dallas Builders Association’s Phil Crone moderated.

Candy will dissect the debate later today, but for now, we have the recorded Dallas Builders Association debate between District 13 incumbent Jennifer Staubach Gates and former mayor Laura Miller. Let us know what you think! (more…)

Election

Voters lined up at the Oak Lawn library Election Day, with more than 400 people casting ballots by lunchtime (photo by Bethany Erickson)

Frisco, Richardson and Dallas ISD Pass Property Tax Increases

  • Allred bests Sessions in U.S. Rep. District 32 race
  • All four propositions on the ballot for Dallas ISD passed
  • Johnson beats Rinaldi, Johnson beats Luby Ryan
  • Carolyn King Arnold, Keyaira Saunders headed to a runoff

While Democrats came surprisingly (to many) close to winning statewide seats on Election Day, ultimately candidates came just short of besting the Republican party across the board in statewide races. How close were the races, despite the losses? In 16 years, Democratic candidates in statewide races have received 45 percent of the vote only twice — last night, nine of them did.

“Today is not a bad day,” Mike Collier, Democratic candidate for Lieutenant Governor, said Tuesday night. “We showed Texas that if you campaign on issues that Texans care about, you can have a strong showing in this state.”

But while the “Beto Effect” may not have bestowed a win on its namesake, it was still impacting races, with the El Paso congressman’s get out the vote effort being attributed to down-ballot flips in several congressional, state, and local races.

After record early voting, Election Day polling locations varied from “ghost towns,” as one poll greeter said, to steadily busy. Turnout increased as schools let out, and as people got off work, volunteers said.

Election Day

After a bit of turmoil during early voting, the Lakeside Activity Center in Mesquite was actually calm and congenial Election Day.

Measures for 13-cent Tax Ratification Elections passed in both Richardson ISD and Dallas ISD. Frisco ISD voters approved a 13-cent tax swap that will move 13 cents from the debt service column to the maintenance and operations column.   (more…)

NobodyNow I know you’re probably already squawking — I can hear it from here — about this “Nobody” business in this headline. “NOBODY? Record turnout, lady, in early voting — how is that NOBODY votes?”

But hear me out.

If nobody votes, then Nobody will win. And that’s not just brain-breaking hyperbole that the grammarian in me is grappling with. Cartographers Philip Kearney and Jim Herries used Census data to plot nonvoters, and made a really not-ground-breaking-at-all discovery: Nobody (if Nobody was a candidate) would’ve beaten the pants off Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in the last election.

In fact, Nobody would’ve won 445 electoral votes to Trump’s 21 and Clinton’s 72.

To make the editor in me happy, though, can we just say that when people don’t vote, Nobody the Candidate wins?

Now yes, early voting turnout statewide has been incredible. And seriously, even though the lines were long occasionally, voting early is quite possibly the easiest way we currently have available to vote — you can go anywhere in the county, line up, cast your ballot, and walk back out, possibly with a cool new sticker.

In the 30 counties in Texas that contain the bulk of the state’s registered voters, turnout for early voting exceeded the election turnout for the entire 2014 midterm election, data compiled by the Texas Tribune showed.

In Dallas County, there are 1,335,313 registered voters this election, and 529,521 cast their votes early, or 39 percent, compared to 214,312 in 2014. In Tarrant County, 465,817 of the county’s 1,122,597 registered voters (or 41.5 percent) voted early. In Collin County, almost half (49.4 percent) of the county’s 579,893 registered voters voted early. Forty-six percent of Denton County’s 497,490 voters have already cast ballots. (more…)