The White Rock Home Tour is only a couple of weeks away so we are putting the spotlight on one of our favorites, 6522 Trammel Drive! The exquisite A. Gruppo Architects-designed home was built in 2017 and offers 2,650-square-feet of sophisticated luxury living. This includes one-of-kind custom touches from a swinging TV partition to stunning walnut built-ins and polycarbonate walls. But what really makes this home sing?

A Study Of Light And Lighting

According to the owners, Lori and Jim Louis – who both have architecture backgrounds – the home is a study of light and lighting.

“The Polygal light monitors (polycarbonate material used instead of windows in some locations) allow a beautiful quality of natural light to filter in during the day without the need for window coverings,” dishes Lori. “It is translucent and manages UV rays so it is private and controls glare, heat, etc. Between the glass lined courtyard and Polygal light monitors there is natural light all day. In addition, there are skylights on top of the jewel box light crown which bring in natural light to create a soft glow all day long.”

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Dallas designer, Lee Lormand, is a master at creating clean and timeless interiors like the one pictured here, and will be featured in the second Dallas Architecture Forum spring panel discussion on Mar. 5.

Staff Reports

Gear up for the spring season with inspiration from Dallas’ leading architects, designers, and landscape architects at the Dallas Architecture Forum spring 2019 panel discussion! The Dallas Architecture Forum, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing public education about architecture, design and the urban environment, continues its Spring 2019 Panel Discussion Series on Tuesday, March 5, 2019 with “Design Inspirations Part Two,” moderated by Meg Fitzpatrick, President of MMF Strategies.

“Dallas and North Texas are known for award-winning projects – residences and public buildings, interiors and landscapes. With this panel The Forum will continue its exploration of what motivates and inspires some of our area’s outstanding design professionals to create their highly regarded projects,” stated Forum Executive Director Nate Eudaly. “These design leaders will highlight some of their amazing projects, and there will be time for those attending to ask our esteemed panelists more about their work.”

Panels are free for both Forum members and the general public as a public outreach of The Forum. The discussion begins at 6:30 pm, with complimentary beverages available beginning at 6:15 pm. No reservations are needed to attend. As a bonus, one CEU AIA credit is available.

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Thomas Woltz and his firm, NBW, is designing the urban green space in New York City’s Hudson Yards project.

When Dallas thinks about public green space, the first thought that bubbles up is our scarcity of it. Sure, we’ve tried to bring more public spaces to our urban core with great, though expensive, outcomes. With a city whose built environment weighs heavily on the side of car culture, how do you add green space that adds value to pedestrian and commuter, alike? It’s a problem that renowned landscape architect Thomas Woltz has puzzled through, again and again. CandysDirt.com was afforded the unique opportunity to get Woltz’s perspective ahead of his 7 p.m. lecture with the Dallas Architecture Forum at the Dallas Museum of Art’s Horchow Auditorium.

Tickets for this lecture are $20 for general admission, $15 for DMA members, and $5 for students (with ID). Tickets can be purchased at the door before the lecture. No reservations are needed to attend Forum lectures. Dallas Architecture Forum members receive free admission to all regular Forum lectures as a benefit of membership, and AIA members can earn one hour of CE credit for each lecture. For more information on The Dallas Architecture Forum, visit www.dallasarchitectureforum.org or call 214-764-2406.

Thomas Woltz

As principal of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects (NBW), a 45-person firm based in Charlottesville, Virginia and New York City, Woltz has infused narratives of the land into the places where people live, work and play, deepening the public’s enjoyment of the natural world and inspiring environmental stewardship. NBW projects create models of biodiversity and sustainable agriculture within areas of damaged ecological infrastructure and working farmland, yielding hundreds of acres of reconstructed wetlands, reforested land, native meadows and flourishing wildlife habitat.

Presently, Thomas and NBW are entrusted with the design of major public parks across the United States, Canada and New Zealand. These projects include Memorial Park in Houston, Hudson Yards in New York City, NoMA Green in Washington DC, Cornwall Park in Auckland, the Aga Khan Garden in Alberta, Canada, and three parks in Nashville, including Centennial Park.

Centennial Park, Nashville, Tennessee

“Thomas Woltz has the unusual distinction of a being a landscape architect who has designed residential, corporate and public projects. He brings a unique approach to landscape design by pursuing thorough research to understand the ecology and history of an area as the basis for the design,” stated Forum executive director Nate Eudaly. “Because his goal is to move beyond just decorating the environment to improving the underlying eco-system and bringing forth the history of an area to create an identity that draws people from various backgrounds, he has been called a visionary and has attracted wide acclaim for his work.”

Woltz will speak today, Feb. 6 at 7 p.m., with check-in and a complimentary reception beginning at 6:15 p.m., at the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Keep reading for our exclusive Q&A with the visionary landscape architect:

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Amangiri Resort & Spa, Kane County, Utah. (Photo Courtesy of the Architect)

Rick Joy

Rick Joy, founder of Rick Joy Architects (Studio Rick Joy), will speak at the Dallas Architecture Forum‘s Second Annual Frank Welch Memorial Lecture at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 23, in the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art. Joy’s renowned Tucson, Arizona, firm is recognized for sensitive, thoughtful approaches to site, observation, process, landscape, and building, with projects ranging from trend-setting single-family homes to large-scale resort projects throughout the globe. 

Joy’s designs offer a striking parallel to Frank Welch‘s body of work. Welch, who died in 2017, worked under the tutelage of the legendary O’Neil Ford and was considered one of the most recognizable and prolific among Texas Modernist architects. Dallas is home to a significant number of Frank Welch designs, which painstakingly incorporate the natural surrounding elements to create a harmony between site and structure. Many of these homes have hosted Dallas Architecture Forum events. 

“All of our studio’s work is rooted in developing an understanding of a ‘place’ and how the house design will be integrated in harmony to its surroundings,” Joy told CandysDirt.com. “We investigate the ‘culture’ of other well-designed buildings in the area, and use that as a basis to develop a design appropriate to the natural environment of that site.”

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Ward House (2004) on Farquhar Lane – Patron Tour House sponsored by Becky Frey Real Estate Group (Photos: Charles Davis Smith, AIA)

By Donovan Westover
Special Contributor

We are honored to attribute an entire Preservation Dallas home tour to Frank Welch on October 28.  I was fortunate to meet Frank many many moons ago and develop an alliance with him, as everybody in his life did.  What’s not to like?  He was intriguing, he did not pass up a drink, he had linguistic flair (he cussed, like me) and I enjoyed his colorful observations.  In his later years, I recollect shuttling him around for a project when Frank dropped another classic:

“I have the worst vision, but I can tell you that house is Goddamn ugly.”

Linguistic.

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William Briggs

Integration of landscape and architectural ornament create a sense of peace and repose in this William Briggs-designed home in Dallas. Photo: James Edward

When hiring an architect, a lot of people think mostly in terms of the style of their home and details they want in the house. Makes perfect sense, right?

But a truly successful relationship between architect and client begins with a different way of thinking, says William Briggs, founder and owner of William S. Briggs Architects. He’s on a mission to transform the conversations he has with clients and move deeper.

“The real issues are space, materials, light, and how they support a life within them,” said Briggs. “Ornament and style should only be seen as servants to these larger ideas.”

Briggs wants his clients thinking about how they live their lives, how they use their space, and how they function within their home. He wants to create classic homes, no matter the style, that stand the test of time.

“When an architect meets with a client, the client has certain preferences and tastes borne out of how they see their life to be lived,” he said. “It’s incumbent on the architect to listen carefully and give them best version of what that means. Once you can do that, the project will stand the test of time and be refreshing for years to come.”

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Panel 8.1.16

[Editor’s Note: We’re hosting a robust conversation about the future of Fair Park here on CandysDirt.com ahead of the 8:30 a.m., Aug. 4 City of Dallas Park Board meeting that could help decide the iconic landmark’s fate.]

UPDATE: We have the entire agenda, including the unabridged version of the Walt Humann proposal for managing Fair Park, embedded at the end of this piece.

If you care about the fate of Fair Park, you may want to show up to the Park Board meeting this Thursday. Or at least read the 20-year, $12 million management contract that the Park Board will be voting on.

Park Board Agenda

Monday night’s panel discussion on Fair Park and the potential Park Board vote on Walt Humann’s management contract filled the Hall of State (around 300 attendees.) Despite Mayor Mike Rawlings’ last-minute press conference Monday afternoon to “make sure everybody knows the exact truth of what’s happened,” that everyone’s behind this approach (a private firm managing Fair Park), that the Park Board has been talking to Walt for two years, and “now it’s time to vote.” It was all too dismissive of the community meeting scheduled for later in the day.

The community meeting was organized in less than 1 week, in response to the July 21st Park Board special work session meeting where board members walked out (see about minute 31 of the meeting) in objection to the truncated meeting agenda which limited a thorough discussion on the proposed management contract.  They are expected to vote on the management contract at the upcoming meeting at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 4, which would then set it up for a city council vote. To enact the management contract for the next fiscal year, the agreement would need to be passed through council before next year’s budget is approved in September. These boards meet once a month, and the council meets twice a month with time required to put items on the agendas … you see the rush.

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aiacedars[1]

Tragically, not every project that an architect designs makes its way from concept to reality. Truly, some of the most ground-breaking work that architects do never break ground. However, these designs and concepts deserve recognition, and that’s just what the AIA Dallas Unbuilt Awards will do.

This year’s pop-up exhibition tomorrow, April 28, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. is hosted by Lofty Spaces at 816 Montgomery in the Cedars. You can check out the gallery of unbuilt designs and cast your ballot on your favorites while meeting and mingling with the show’s jurors. Admission is $15 for AIA Dallas members and $20 for the general public.

Jump for more!

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