Swiss AveEdit

by Cassie Evans – guest blogger and Candy’s daughter.

Instead of a heavy brunch doting on her, Mom (aka Dallas Dirt Queen, Candace Evans) and I spent Mother’s Day afternoon doing what we do best: judging looking at houses! We loved every minute of the Swiss Avenue Historic District’s Mother’s Day Home Tour.

(more…)

6918_Patricia

(Editor’s Note: Cassie Evans, Candy’s amazing animal-loving daughter, will be sharing a few posts from her new blog on how she’s getting her adorable home ready for the annual Hollywood Santa Monica Neighborhood Association 2014 Hollywood Home Tour. Interior Design by Bernadette Schaeffler. Enjoy!)

If you ever need to get several items accomplished around the house, perhaps a mini renovation, little organizational projects, or take that baby down to the studs and build it back up, having your home asked to be part of a HOME TOUR is the fire under your fanny that will get all of those things done.

Hollywood Heights is a historical conservation district. The story of Hollywood/Santa Monica begins in the 1920s when J.B. Salmon acquired this former dairy farm and formed the Hollywood Company to subdivide and improve the land. Also known as the developer of Kessler Highlands in Oak Cliff, Mr. Salmon was exceedingly careful in the planning of his property. So thoughtfully conceived was his development that he could allow other developers to build in diverse styles as long as they stayed within the deed restrictions. These styles include the predominant Tudor Cottage, as well as Spanish Eclectic, French Eclectic, Minimal Traditional, Craftsman, Monterrey, and two rare examples of the flatroofed Pueblo Revival style. We may suppose that Mr. Salmon was pleased by the outcome because he made his home within the development. Much has been said of the architecture to be found in Hollywood and Santa Monica, and the neighborhood may well be the largest collection of stone-embellished Tudor cottages in the nation. Indeed, it’s because of the attention paid to the aesthetic beauty of the area and its historical significance that in 1989 the neighborhood association succeeded in having Hollywood/Santa Monica declared a local Conservation District. This classification is shared by only a few other neighborhoods in the Dallas area.

We were very excited when we checked the mail and found a letter stating that the HSMNA (Hollywood Heights Santa Monica Neighborhood Association, Inc.) would like to consider our home to be part of the 23rd Annual Hollywood Home Tour. If you haven’t heard me screaming from our little rooftop about it – I’m that smitten – we live in Hollywood Heights on the most quaint, quiet, darling street in Dallas. It’s called Patricia, and us Patricians refer to ourselves as the Patricia Militia. Ain’t nothing getting past us. Our ultimate goal is to gate in little Patricia and have Tolltags open the gates. Unlikely to happen now, but once the home tour is over and I have some spare time, well… you never know! Our street is like a movie set – everyone says “hi” when out in their yard, everyone knows everyone’s pets and kids (and their kids can say your pets and your name no matter how young they are), and we look out for each other when someone is out of town. (Jake is not afraid to use night vision goggles and a shotgun…).

This wasn’t just like “oh great, sure we’ll be in the home tour.” A “walk through” was set up wherein the committee came over and toured our home, looking at all the details and definitely taking mental notes of what needed to be accomplished/changed stat. When you have two working attorneys and 6-7 animals at any given time, plus Board duties and Junior League, who do you think is going to meet the ________ workman between 9am and 12pm, to which he likely won’t show, and then make sure he does his job, doesn’t destroy anything else that will require another workman, doesn’t steal, and doesn’t let a cat or dog out of the house or yard? Yeah, it doesn’t happen.

Cat LadyI was a little nervous after the walk through. These people, whom I had never met before, likely think I am an animal hoarder. When they entered the house, there were 3 animals in small crates, and one HUGE crate (Bitsy). It was VERY loud and I had to bribe everyone with Greenies. Our grass was dead (so was everyone’s – it was winter and we’d had 3 freezes) but add that to the animal hoarding, absurd tee shirt and shampoo collection, and my love of reusing large Sonic styrofoam cups, and these people may start a separate, one-home tour called “what the hell is going on in this house?”

Shockingly, we received a letter a few weeks later. I was sure it was the “we’ve contacted the City about you. We think you have a problem and you need help” letter from HSMNA.

Instead, it was “you’re home has been selected for the 23rd Annual Hollywood Home Tour. What I read in between the lines was “now get your ass to work on that house.” Well, that’s just what I needed!

Due to some other factors as well, I took time off from working and decided to hit the home organization/project ground running. (Lent is such a great time to give up nuisances). I inventoried our home, made a list of everything that needed to be done in my mind, checked those items against a reasonable budget, tailored the list, found qualified workmen for each project (joining Angie’s List was really helpful – reviews are essential when quality, punctuality, and price are critical), and scheduled them all, and got to work.

The urine colored marble fireplace sans mantle HAD TO BE OVERHAULED. Here’s a before pic:

Fireplace Before

So I decided on travertine to go with my country french furniture and to complement the black mantle that is being made by a carpenter I found to match the home’s fabulous, detailed moulding.

Moulding

Progress pics:

Fireplace Progress Fireplace Tile Fireplace Tile Grout

Huge difference, no?! [Ignore the row of yellow on top – that will be completely covered by the mantle!] If you need a tile/stone worker, my guy is AMAZING. He hand chipped the side of the pieces that had to be cut to make them look perfect. I heart him. Next stop – a chimney sweep to teach me how to use this bad boy and what type of gas logs I need to invest in. Again, there are usually great deals on Angie’s List for chimney sweeps, especially now when they are out of season.

I also had an electronics man come out and mount the ridiculously large television on the wall and run the wires through the wall to a box near the floor so you don’t see any hint of wires.

Wall Mount TV

I actually had to leave him at the house while I ran my bleeding cat to the vet one day. When I returned, covered in blood and fur, stressed, and worried, he nervously informed me that when he went to drill a hold for the wires through the fire wall in the wall, there was a random pier at a 45 degree angle that his drill hit and it came flying out the wall. And yes, it put a hole in the wall precisely where we did not want one. “I’m so sorry, are you mad?” I told him, “Randall, I’m covered in cat blood, I have cat blood all over my house and back steps, and they don’t know if they can fix his leg at this point. This hole is the least of my concerns and I am not mad at you at all.” I’ve never seen such relief on a man’s face. Apparently, some homeowners’ are real assholesjerks; he was expecting me to fly off the handle. He had his dry wall guy come out with him the next time, of course did not charge me for the mistake, and all is ok in the world!

He also installed a small tv in our bathroom. The previous owner has mirrors all over the walls to make the space appear bigger and brighter, and it turns out that ordering a tv from walmart.com is much cheaper than replacing a custom mirror with a space for a tv mount with another custom mirror without said space. So, looks like my showers will be as long as Naked & Afraid from now on…

Bath TV

Rats on Patricia (1)

This is a guest post by Cassie Evans. We love having her as a guest blogger. She is a busy attorney who practices commercial/business litigation as well as real estate law (yes, she’s brilliant!). She lives in charming Hollywood Heights Santa Monica with her hubby and ever-changing menagerie of rescue and foster pets, some not so welcome. I do know that critter problems exist all over this city, including (shockers) Highland Drive, in Highland park, where one critter catcher once told me he saw the worst infestation of roof rats ever!

Now that Dallas has been very cold for the THIRD time this winter (that is my version of meteorology – just go with it), I am happy to report that some of my least favorite cold-weather house guests are gone. Gonzo. For good. Like if they come back, I just call a number, and someone comes over to evict them. There is even a “good riddance” guarantee that attaches this service to our house for life, should we sell. Every landlord should be so lucky.

I’m talking about my former house guests, roof rats.

When the temperatures dropped, apparently a newsflash went out in the Lakewood Roof Rat Times to come on over to our house. No bueno.  You see, roof rats thrive from November to May in the South when temps are cooler and they can tootle around comfortably. Although rats are common throughout all parts of the U.S., roof rats can be found mostly in the Southern states and along the west and east coasts. Roof rats eat mostly grains, seeds, fruit, and garbage so you are likely to find roof rats anywhere there is a human population. And though they are active during twilight and nighttime hours, they like to have a command center from which they venture out 200-300 feet to run their little rat errands. Like acrobats,they can walk up and down the sides of houses, jump from tree limbs, or travel along power lines and vines. INTO YOUR HOME.

Somehow, our attic became The Command Center.

We didn’t know it was The Command Center right away. That’s the thing about these tricky creatures – they make you second guess yourself. They can sneak in through any opening the size of a nickel or larger. I know a lot of people don’t use change anymore. But if you recall what a nickel looks like, it ain’t big. So they get in pretty much almost anywhere in a house built in 1938. Or one built in 2000 — my parents had rats after a squirrel took their home’s virginity.

Our house is in amazing shape thanks to the seller we bought it from. (Selling agent: Todd Terry.) He was a decorator who completely re-did the (tiny) interior – all updated to perfection – yet retained the charm of the exterior, which is the biggest draw of this neighborhood. It’s modeled after a New Orleans cottage. These must be Cajun rats – they fell in love with it.

One night, while laying in bed, I heard something above us. I thought it was in the attic, but had never heard any noise up there before. Our attic is very small and only used for insulation. It’s not a storage attic – thank God. I looked to Husband, “did you hear that?”

“No, I didn’t hear anything.”

Of course he didn’t. I must be making this up in my head. There is nothing up there. It was probably a stick on the roof or a Lakewood owl out on the hunt. Something plausible.

The next night I heard it again – around the same time. At this point I thought maybe I needed to check myself in somewhere. An adult camp. For the crazy. Get a brain and ear tune up. Again, Husband heard nothing. I saw NO reaction from his face. I looked at our pack of dogs for a reaction. They were all lying in our bed on their plush dog blanket, relaxing after a hard day of nothing. They were not concerned with mommy’s hallucinations.

So I did what any normal homeowner would do. I looked to our rescue cat for advice. Right? Aren’t they good at this sort of thing? I went and got his precious highness off the ottoman in the living room where he lays in a tray (yes, I have trained him to lay in a tray instead of on my furniture) and looks out a front window. I buttered him up, telling him how much I loved him, how I wanted to snuggle. Put him in our bed. Pet him. Heard a noise. BAM, he looks straight up at the ceiling above our heads. HALLELUJAH! I’m NOT crazy! The cat has confirmed it! I go to bed and set my alarm. The minute I woke the next morning, I called Critter Control. Due to the icy weather, they could not reach a client who lived far away, but could come to me. Thank goodness. We have enough pets right now. We were not looking to take in stray roof rats. A trapper was chez Evans-Decker within 2.5 hours.

Not sure I was fully prepared for what happened next. After checking my attic, quietly, Mr. Trapper informed me that there were too many “critters” to trap. No, it wasn’t hundreds, but more than like 8-10, and, like bratty teens,  they had become difficult suckers to trap. And then he told me what they were doing up there: POOPING. HAVING SEX! Roof rat scat, urine and x-rated activities in my pristine attic? Our Seller had just put in brand new, snow-white insulation a few years ago.

Oh, it’s no longer snow white, I was told.

Apparently, that type of fluffy, fun insulation is like roof rat crack. They LOVED it. The Critter Control rep took pics with his cell phone in the attic and showed me. I stayed grounded, no way I was going up there. Nor, actually, was the cat. He was back on his tray.

The Critter Catcher showed me photos of huge holes made in the insulation. He said they were really big tunnels for rats. Apparently, these rats weren’t just tunneling for warmth up there, peeing pooping and having sex. There was a roof rat frat gig going on with Hurricane Harbor slides.

Take it all out, I said, freaking, take everything.

I totally forgot there is important stuff up there. Like, oh, all the electrical wiring. And our surround sound speakers that are in every room. These freeloading guests could be causing THOUSANDS of dollars of damage and possibly cause an electrical fire. And I don’t know if you’ve checked your Homeowner’s Insurance Policy lately, but almost all contain an exclusion for rodents and rodent-related damage.

(But not for fire. And that’s all I’m saying on this topic.)

The rats had to be evicted, and this had to be a rush job.

I begged Critter Control to bump me up on the priority list. I had visions of a home we had owned for 5 months becoming infested and condemned by the City in two weeks. And it’s scary. Your home is generally your biggest investment to date, next to possibly student loans. Certainly ours was, or is.

Lucky for me, they took pity on our 13.5 year old Cavalier King Charles, Polly, who has congestive heart failure and just enough dementia to be adorable to strangers. Critter Catchers would save her from the rats. Apparently, rat poop and urine can spread some serious diseases to both humans and pets, including Rat-Bite Fever (good luck telling anyone you had that) and Leptospirosis. And they carry fleas, which carry a host of diseases.

They had to go. I was starting to google “blow torch”.

We chose Critter Control because it’s a national company and they provide a lifetime guarantee against further infestation that remains with the property – i.e. it’s a selling point, especially in areas that are prone to wildlife. They can pretty much handle ANY animal/critter. So the next time I see a spider, all I have to do is call them –kidding. But if we do have a snake, a possum, whatever, trespass, they will come to this home for free and humanely remove and re-home it. Truly is a good selling point.

Rats on Patricia (2) Rats on Patricia (7) Rats on Patricia (8) Rats on Patricia (11)So the weekend after Thanksgiving, Team Critter Control arrived for Operation Roof Rat Removal Day. There were so many men. They all wore the protective gear and masks and headed into my once pristine, now rat poop central attic. They sucked out the rats (some had left for their daily errands, but some were fast asleep), vacuumed out all of the insulation with these amazing, powerful vacuums (which they also used to kindly vacuum our landscaping and suck up all the leftover fall leaves – very handy), cleaned the entire attic space with hospital-grade germicidal cleaner, checked all electrical wires for nibbles and fixed any that needed repairing, and then blew all new insulation into our attic that rats do not like – cellulose based insulation coated in boric acid.

We are no longer providing them their dream environment.

Oh, it didn’t stop there. The rest of the Team was outside and scanning below the house, finding every point of entry for the unwanted animals, to ensure the elimination of recurrent wildlife invasions. Screens were vented, all eaves sealed, the chimney capped for rodents, under-house venting checked and all entry holes closed off. They also checked every single air duct to make sure no shenanigans had occurred in them and that there was no damage. All of this was included in one price.

So yeah, we now live in an impenetrable FORTRESS.

30 days post roof-rats, they came to check the traps in the attic. Not only were they empty and none of the bait touched, there wasn’t so much as a paw print in the brand new insulation.

Seriously, fortress.

When Icepocalypse 2013 hit, we really got to see how well insulated our home is. When it started warming up outside and everyone’s roofs were dripping water, our roof retained an even layer of snow and ice across it, gradually warming, but slower than every house on the block. Ok, we don’t just live in a fortress. We live in a Hot Pocket. This bad boy is about as green as you can get for a 1938 home with the new roof (thank you hail storm of 2012) and rodent free cellulose insulation. If I ever hear that noise again…. I just have to call Critter Control!

Rats on Patricia (19)And by the way, the reason Husband never heard it – he sleeps with ear plugs due to the menagerie of dog snores. Perhaps I’m not that crazy after all….

As a side note, I was shocked by how many people with small children – like crawling on the ground-age small children – confessed to having had rodent infestation issues but put out poison and do not do removal/professional clean up to “keep costs down.” I’m sorry – you want to keep costs down so you let your kiddo crawl around near rat poison, urine, and feces, and are fine with that?Cassie

YIKES. I have nothing else to say in print but, yikes!

 

Rats on Patricia (1)

This is a guest post by Cassie Evans. We love having her as a guest blogger. She is a busy attorney who practices commercial/business litigation as well as real estate law (yes, she’s brilliant!). She lives in charming Hollywood Heights Santa Monica with her hubby and ever-changing menagerie of rescue and foster pets, some not so welcome. I do know that critter problems exist all over this city, including (shockers) Highland Drive, in Highland park, where one critter catcher once told me he saw the worst infestation of roof rats ever!

Now that Dallas has been very cold for the THIRD time this winter (that is my version of meteorology – just go with it), I am happy to report that some of my least favorite cold-weather house guests are gone. Gonzo. For good. Like if they come back, I just call a number, and someone comes over to evict them. There is even a “good riddance” guarantee that attaches this service to our house for life, should we sell. Every landlord should be so lucky.

I’m talking about my former house guests, roof rats.

When the temperatures dropped, apparently a newsflash went out in the Lakewood Roof Rat Times to come on over to our house. No bueno.  You see, roof rats thrive from November to May in the South when temps are cooler and they can tootle around comfortably. Although rats are common throughout all parts of the U.S., roof rats can be found mostly in the Southern states and along the west and east coasts. Roof rats eat mostly grains, seeds, fruit, and garbage so you are likely to find roof rats anywhere there is a human population. And though they are active during twilight and nighttime hours, they like to have a command center from which they venture out 200-300 feet to run their little rat errands. Like acrobats,they can walk up and down the sides of houses, jump from tree limbs, or travel along power lines and vines. INTO YOUR HOME.

Somehow, our attic became The Command Center.

We didn’t know it was The Command Center right away. That’s the thing about these tricky creatures – they make you second guess yourself. They can sneak in through any opening the size of a nickel or larger. I know a lot of people don’t use change anymore. But if you recall what a nickel looks like, it ain’t big. So they get in pretty much almost anywhere in a house built in 1938. Or one built in 2000 — my parents had rats after a squirrel took their home’s virginity.

Our house is in amazing shape thanks to the seller we bought it from. (Selling agent: Todd Terry.) He was a decorator who completely re-did the (tiny) interior – all updated to perfection – yet retained the charm of the exterior, which is the biggest draw of this neighborhood. It’s modeled after a New Orleans cottage. These must be Cajun rats – they fell in love with it.

One night, while laying in bed, I heard something above us. I thought it was in the attic, but had never heard any noise up there before. Our attic is very small and only used for insulation. It’s not a storage attic – thank God. I looked to Husband, “did you hear that?”

“No, I didn’t hear anything.”

Of course he didn’t. I must be making this up in my head. There is nothing up there. It was probably a stick on the roof or a Lakewood owl out on the hunt. Something plausible.

The next night I heard it again – around the same time. At this point I thought maybe I needed to check myself in somewhere. An adult camp. For the crazy. Get a brain and ear tune up. Again, Husband heard nothing. I saw NO reaction from his face. I looked at our pack of dogs for a reaction. They were all lying in our bed on their plush dog blanket, relaxing after a hard day of nothing. They were not concerned with mommy’s hallucinations.

So I did what any normal homeowner would do. I looked to our rescue cat for advice. Right? Aren’t they good at this sort of thing? I went and got his precious highness off the ottoman in the living room where he lays in a tray (yes, I have trained him to lay in a tray instead of on my furniture) and looks out a front window. I buttered him up, telling him how much I loved him, how I wanted to snuggle. Put him in our bed. Pet him. Heard a noise. BAM, he looks straight up at the ceiling above our heads. HALLELUJAH! I’m NOT crazy! The cat has confirmed it! I go to bed and set my alarm. The minute I woke the next morning, I called Critter Control. Due to the icy weather, they could not reach a client who lived far away, but could come to me. Thank goodness. We have enough pets right now. We were not looking to take in stray roof rats. A trapper was chez Evans-Decker within 2.5 hours.

Not sure I was fully prepared for what happened next. After checking my attic, quietly, Mr. Trapper informed me that there were too many “critters” to trap. No, it wasn’t hundreds, but more than like 8-10, and, like bratty teens,  they had become difficult suckers to trap. And then he told me what they were doing up there: POOPING. HAVING SEX! Roof rat scat, urine and x-rated activities in my pristine attic? Our Seller had just put in brand new, snow-white insulation a few years ago.

Oh, it’s no longer snow white, I was told.

Apparently, that type of fluffy, fun insulation is like roof rat crack. They LOVED it. The Critter Control rep took pics with his cell phone in the attic and showed me. I stayed grounded, no way I was going up there. Nor, actually, was the cat. He was back on his tray.

The Critter Catcher showed me photos of huge holes made in the insulation. He said they were really big tunnels for rats. Apparently, these rats weren’t just tunneling for warmth up there, peeing pooping and having sex. There was a roof rat frat gig going on with Hurricane Harbor slides.

Take it all out, I said, freaking, take everything.

I totally forgot there is important stuff up there. Like, oh, all the electrical wiring. And our surround sound speakers that are in every room. These freeloading guests could be causing THOUSANDS of dollars of damage and possibly cause an electrical fire. And I don’t know if you’ve checked your Homeowner’s Insurance Policy lately, but almost all contain an exclusion for rodents and rodent-related damage.

(But not for fire. And that’s all I’m saying on this topic.)

The rats had to be evicted, and this had to be a rush job.

I begged Critter Control to bump me up on the priority list. I had visions of a home we had owned for 5 months becoming infested and condemned by the City in two weeks. And it’s scary. Your home is generally your biggest investment to date, next to possibly student loans. Certainly ours was, or is.

Lucky for me, they took pity on our 13.5 year old Cavalier King Charles, Polly, who has congestive heart failure and just enough dementia to be adorable to strangers. Critter Catchers would save her from the rats. Apparently, rat poop and urine can spread some serious diseases to both humans and pets, including Rat-Bite Fever (good luck telling anyone you had that) and Leptospirosis. And they carry fleas, which carry a host of diseases.

They had to go. I was starting to google “blow torch”.

We chose Critter Control because it’s a national company and they provide a lifetime guarantee against further infestation that remains with the property – i.e. it’s a selling point, especially in areas that are prone to wildlife. They can pretty much handle ANY animal/critter. So the next time I see a spider, all I have to do is call them –kidding. But if we do have a snake, a possum, whatever, trespass, they will come to this home for free and humanely remove and re-home it. Truly is a good selling point.

Rats on Patricia (2) Rats on Patricia (7) Rats on Patricia (8) Rats on Patricia (11)So the weekend after Thanksgiving, Team Critter Control arrived for Operation Roof Rat Removal Day. There were so many men. They all wore the protective gear and masks and headed into my once pristine, now rat poop central attic. They sucked out the rats (some had left for their daily errands, but some were fast asleep), vacuumed out all of the insulation with these amazing, powerful vacuums (which they also used to kindly vacuum our landscaping and suck up all the leftover fall leaves – very handy), cleaned the entire attic space with hospital-grade germicidal cleaner, checked all electrical wires for nibbles and fixed any that needed repairing, and then blew all new insulation into our attic that rats do not like – cellulose based insulation coated in boric acid.

We are no longer providing them their dream environment.

Oh, it didn’t stop there. The rest of the Team was outside and scanning below the house, finding every point of entry for the unwanted animals, to ensure the elimination of recurrent wildlife invasions. Screens were vented, all eaves sealed, the chimney capped for rodents, under-house venting checked and all entry holes closed off. They also checked every single air duct to make sure no shenanigans had occurred in them and that there was no damage. All of this was included in one price.

So yeah, we now live in an impenetrable FORTRESS.

30 days post roof-rats, they came to check the traps in the attic. Not only were they empty and none of the bait touched, there wasn’t so much as a paw print in the brand new insulation.

Seriously, fortress.

When Icepocalypse 2013 hit, we really got to see how well insulated our home is. When it started warming up outside and everyone’s roofs were dripping water, our roof retained an even layer of snow and ice across it, gradually warming, but slower than every house on the block. Ok, we don’t just live in a fortress. We live in a Hot Pocket. This bad boy is about as green as you can get for a 1938 home with the new roof (thank you hail storm of 2012) and rodent free cellulose insulation. If I ever hear that noise again…. I just have to call Critter Control!

Rats on Patricia (19)And by the way, the reason Husband never heard it – he sleeps with ear plugs due to the menagerie of dog snores. Perhaps I’m not that crazy after all….

As a side note, I was shocked by how many people with small children – like crawling on the ground-age small children – confessed to having had rodent infestation issues but put out poison and do not do removal/professional clean up to “keep costs down.” I’m sorry – you want to keep costs down so you let your kiddo crawl around near rat poison, urine, and feces, and are fine with that?Cassie

YIKES. I have nothing else to say in print but, yikes!

 

Doing Good 1Two former  U.S. Navy SEALs, Clint Bruce and Stephen Holley, co-founders of Carry the Load,  snagged The Dallas Foundation’s 2013 Good Works Under 40 Award at Trammel Crow’s Old Parkland Hospital Campus Thursday night.

Holley is a 2000 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy who completed four military deployments and now works in commercial real estate.  He is with the Dallas office of Jones Lang LaSalle.

Bruce is also a U.S. Naval Academy graduate, was deployed multiple times, and lives in Dallas. He founded a private risk-management firm, Trident Response Group LLC, and a speaker’s bureau called Thirty&3.

The young men were honored for founding Carry the Load, a charitable organization that raises money for and honors people who have served their country: veterans, active-duty military personnel, first responders and their families. Carry the Load sponsored a 20-hour march in Dallas last Memorial Day weekend. Some participants carry heavy packs as they march. The agency has raised more than $1.5 million this year and helped support Heroes on the Water, Friends of Dallas Fire-Rescue, Assist the Officer Foundation, Tip of the Spear Foundation and Sons of the Flag Burn Foundation.

As winners, Bruce and Holley will receive an $8,000 contribution to their organization from  The Dallas Foundation, in partnership with The Dallas Morning News.

The duo were one of five finalists for the Good Works Under 40 Award selected and honored by The Dallas Foundation. The finalists were  Brittany K. Byrd, a Dallas attorney who founded Girls Embracing Mothers, an organization that helps girls aged 7 to 17 visit their mothers in prison; Paige Chenault, founder of The Birthday Party Project, an organization that provide birthday parties to homeless and disadvantaged children; Cassie Evans, a Dallas attorney and the youngest board member of the SPCA of Texas, who has raised more than $225,000 for spay and neuter clinics and spends every day of her life as an advocate for animal kindness; and Dr. J Mack Slaughter Jr., who volunteers with Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children ans created a nonprofit that supplies soothing music to comfort seriously ill patients, Music in Medicine, or MiM.

In a sense, each finalist was also a winner: they received a $2,500 contribution to the nonprofit he or she supports.Doing Good 2

Full disclosure: I am the very proud mother of Cassie Evans. And I am so impressed with the sincere efforts of these young people, being at the event and meeting them was a true inspiration, especially on Veteran’s Day!Cassie