About three years ago, Compass Real Estate agent Phillip Murrell discovered an attractive off-market duplex in the M Streets. He liked it so much, he and his partner bought it.  Then they had to decide whether to seek out a long-term tenant or try the short-term rental market.

“At that point, Airbnb was big but a lot less tested than it is now,” Murrell recalls. “I didn’t know anyone personally who did an Airbnb.”

He initially rented out the bottom unit to a client who needed a place for six months. Upstairs, he began adding consignment furniture along with some of his own. Before long it was time to list the space and see what happened.

“The response was almost instant,” Murrell recalls. “Upstairs we were getting well over $2,700 per month.”

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Airbnb

Dallas company NoiseAware says its noise-detection device is the answer for Airbnb hosts that want to be good neighbors (Photo courtesy: NoiseAware).

A couple of weeks ago, I looked at a problem a few neighbors approached me with — a nearby property owner renting out a house on Airbnb that had become a nuisance, they felt, with a succession of parties.

That column prompted David Krauss to email me. Krauss and his business partner, Andrew Schulz, have a product they feel is a boon to homeowners taking advantage of the short-term rental market — a noise detector that alerts a host when the noise level is reaching neighbor-irritating levels.

“We like to call it a smoke detector for noise,” Krauss told me. The device plugs into any electrical outlet, and after a fairly easy setup, begins churning out data for homeowners. (more…)

 airbnb dadaAirbnb’s meteoric growth has shaken the hospitality industry, and is making homeowners mighty nervous about who their next-door neighbors might suddenly be. There have been regulatory fights to leash the short term rental site from New York to Barcelona.