William Briggs

Integration of landscape and architectural ornament create a sense of peace and repose in this William Briggs-designed home in Dallas. Photo: James Edward

When hiring an architect, a lot of people think mostly in terms of the style of their home and details they want in the house. Makes perfect sense, right?

But a truly successful relationship between architect and client begins with a different way of thinking, says William Briggs, founder and owner of William S. Briggs Architects. He’s on a mission to transform the conversations he has with clients and move deeper.

“The real issues are space, materials, light, and how they support a life within them,” said Briggs. “Ornament and style should only be seen as servants to these larger ideas.”

Briggs wants his clients thinking about how they live their lives, how they use their space, and how they function within their home. He wants to create classic homes, no matter the style, that stand the test of time.

“When an architect meets with a client, the client has certain preferences and tastes borne out of how they see their life to be lived,” he said. “It’s incumbent on the architect to listen carefully and give them best version of what that means. Once you can do that, the project will stand the test of time and be refreshing for years to come.”

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Panel 8.1.16

[Editor’s Note: We’re hosting a robust conversation about the future of Fair Park here on CandysDirt.com ahead of the 8:30 a.m., Aug. 4 City of Dallas Park Board meeting that could help decide the iconic landmark’s fate.]

UPDATE: We have the entire agenda, including the unabridged version of the Walt Humann proposal for managing Fair Park, embedded at the end of this piece.

If you care about the fate of Fair Park, you may want to show up to the Park Board meeting this Thursday. Or at least read the 20-year, $12 million management contract that the Park Board will be voting on.

Park Board Agenda

Monday night’s panel discussion on Fair Park and the potential Park Board vote on Walt Humann’s management contract filled the Hall of State (around 300 attendees.) Despite Mayor Mike Rawlings’ last-minute press conference Monday afternoon to “make sure everybody knows the exact truth of what’s happened,” that everyone’s behind this approach (a private firm managing Fair Park), that the Park Board has been talking to Walt for two years, and “now it’s time to vote.” It was all too dismissive of the community meeting scheduled for later in the day.

The community meeting was organized in less than 1 week, in response to the July 21st Park Board special work session meeting where board members walked out (see about minute 31 of the meeting) in objection to the truncated meeting agenda which limited a thorough discussion on the proposed management contract.  They are expected to vote on the management contract at the upcoming meeting at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 4, which would then set it up for a city council vote. To enact the management contract for the next fiscal year, the agreement would need to be passed through council before next year’s budget is approved in September. These boards meet once a month, and the council meets twice a month with time required to put items on the agendas … you see the rush.

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aiacedars[1]

Tragically, not every project that an architect designs makes its way from concept to reality. Truly, some of the most ground-breaking work that architects do never break ground. However, these designs and concepts deserve recognition, and that’s just what the AIA Dallas Unbuilt Awards will do.

This year’s pop-up exhibition tomorrow, April 28, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. is hosted by Lofty Spaces at 816 Montgomery in the Cedars. You can check out the gallery of unbuilt designs and cast your ballot on your favorites while meeting and mingling with the show’s jurors. Admission is $15 for AIA Dallas members and $20 for the general public.

Jump for more!

aia_unbuilt (53 of 92)[1]

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10300 Strait Lane ext

Comes word that the tear down of the Bud Oglesby home at 10300 Strait came sooner rather than later.

In fact, she is gone, her body laid to a fitful rest somewhere in Lewisville …

Bud O 1

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Neo Pastiche

Neo Pastiche Banality.  The Tuna Noodle Casserole of Housing

Let’s face it, homes have always been a collection of areas for cooking, sleeping, and primping surrounding a common family or group dining and living area. Sometimes these functions occurred in a single room and sometimes a series of rooms. The more schmancy you get, the more specialized the rooms and the larger the rooms become.  At some point, homes can become their own self-contained city like Barbra Streisand’s underground shopping center or overly task-specific like Candy Spelling’s gift wrapping room.

Yes, differing eras have sought to either open or close off rooms. Interestingly, in addition to overall wealth, it seems that what a society thinks of its women has something to do with interior spaces. When women were thought to be barefoot, pregnant and without meaningful opinions, homes were more closed off.

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M3 Container Hotel

This hotel designed by Beck Architecture is made up of 150 shipping containers.

Dallas architects are designing amazing, mold-breaking structures for sites here and abroad, but not every design becomes more than a concept. Still, good ideas are worth recognizing, so the Dallas Chapter of the American Institute of Architects set out to highlight some of the most amazing unbuilt structures designed by Dallas firms.

Design award recipients were selected by a jury of globally recognized architects and brands. Jurists included Jenny Wu (Oyler Wu Collaborative), Elizabeth Whittaker, AIA (Merge Architects), and Adam Yarinsky, FAIA (Architecture Research Office). Of the 34 entries received, five received awards based on its response to cultural, social, environmental, and contextual challenges.

Two of the winners were conceptual designs for the Dallas Holocaust Museum, one is a striking airport terminal in China, while another is a pavilion that responds to sound. Other entries include a re-design of the first floor of the Belo building at 400 Record Street, urban retail infill on Fort Worth Avenue, and a cool hotel constructed with 150 shipping containers. Residential projects include a modern residence in Preston Hollow on Belmead, as well as a prototype for efficient multi-family housing dubbed “Grotto.” We also love the beautiful, modern concept for a public library in Vickery Park.

Vickery Meadow Branch Library

Oglesby Greene designed a bright and open public library branch for Vickery Meadow.

The May 28 opening at Life in Deep Ellum launched the exhibition of these unique concepts, which will be on display until July 11. You can select your favorite design for one of the People’s Choice Awards, which will be announced at the exhibition’s closing.

“The 2015 Unbuilt Design Award submissions highlight the incredibly diverse work being done by Dallas architects in communities around the world,” said Heath May, AIA, of HKS, Inc. May is the AIA Dallas Design Award Committee Chair. “This year’s winning projects exemplify beautiful and inspiring design that are responsive to contemporary issues.”

Jump to see more of these innovative designs!
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Robert Raymond

Photo: Michael Palumbo

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Robert Raymond

Robert Raymond

Robert W. Raymond, AIA, moved to Dallas in 1981 after completing his Masters in Architecture at the University of Michigan. He has never lived more than a few blocks from White Rock Lake in East Dallas, where he built his family’s home and made the transition to residential architecture in 2000.

“The house turned out great and my wife and daughters are still speaking to me,” he said.

With his firm, Raymond Design, he has built houses in neighborhoods ranging from Preston Hollow and the Peninsula, to Richardson and Southlake.

He was named Young Architect of the Year in 1989 by the Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architecture, served on the board of trustees of the Dallas Architectural Foundation from 2004 to 2006, and has served on the board of trustees of the White Rock Lake Conservancy from 2008 to present.

CandysDirt: You spent 20 years working on big buildings, like hotels and hospitals, moving into residential design in 2000 by designing and building your family house. What appeals to you about residential architecture?

Rob Raymond: There are two main reasons. First, the ability to work from beginning to end on a project, from the initial concept to final construction.

Second, and most rewarding, is working so closely with the client on projects that are near and dear to them. With corporate clients building hotels or hospitals, it’s a business transaction and commercial architecture, in a big firm, is more specialized and compartmentalized. You rarely get the chance to go from inception of idea to ribbon cutting.

With residential architecture, I’m usually working with couples and I joke that it’s part residential architecture and part marriage counseling. It’s fun to get to know people, understand them, and connect with them.

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The Legacy West development in Frisco, designed by Ross Conway and his team at Gensler. All photos and renderings: Ross Conway

The Legacy West development in Frisco, designed by Ross Conway and his team at Gensler. All photos and renderings: Ross Conway

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Ross Conway

Ross Conway

Ross Conway, AIA, LEED AP, is Senior Associate and Design Director in the Lifestyle Studio at Gensler’s Dallas offices, where he has worked for almost 14 years.

His portfolio includes big names like the Dallas Cowboys Headquarters (The Star) in Frisco, the Legacy West addition in Frisco, Preston Hollow Village, The Shops at Park Lane, The Gate in Frisco, The Music Factory in Irving, and the Brazos Riverfront in Waco.

One of his current tasks is the $100-million Bishop Arts redevelopment in North Oak Cliff, an enterprise he calls “a once-in-a-career project for me.”

Conway grew up in Arlington and earned a Masters degree in Architecture from the University of Texas at Arlington. He and his wife recently built a house in Urban Reserve, a Lake Highlands neighborhood of 50 modern, single-family homes, designed by a select group of regionally and nationally recognized architects, including Evan Beattie, the first person we interviewed for this series. He’s also on the architectural review committee there.

CandysDirt: Where are you with the Bishop Arts redevelopment?

Ross Conway: We will finish the design in next few months, and [developer] Exxir Capital wants to start construction in August for phase one. We want to gradually grow it over a two-year process, getting it built out to let people get used to it, and to take into consideration people’s concerns.

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