2017 Fellows (clockwise): Marcia Ascanio, Bob Borson, John Hutchings, Lisa Lamkin, and Michael Malone

2017 Fellows (clockwise): Marcia Ascanio, Bob Borson, John Hutchings, Lisa Lamkin, Michael Malone, and Marcela Abadi Rhoads

Six Dallas architects are among the 178 American Institute of Architects (AIA) members to be elevated  to the College of Fellows. The prestigious, merit-based honor is awarded by a jury of peers to those who have achieved professional excellence and made significant contributions to architecture and to society as a whole. Dallas professionals continue to be well-represented in the College of Fellows.

“We are proud to have a higher percentage of Fellows here in Dallas than elsewhere around the country. It speaks to quality of our members, who are enhancing the quality of life through their practices – both here and around the world,” said Jan Blackmon, FAIA, executive director of AIA Dallas. “With honorees ranging from sports and education facility specialists, to accessibility experts, to communicators sharing a love of architecture with new audiences, the 2017 class of AIA Fellows highlights the diversity of talent and expertise of our Dallas architectural community.”

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backday

The Casa View Cliff May Home Tour will feature seven beautifully remodeled midcentury modern homes in East Dallas. (Photo: ScottReeseVisials.com)

You may be thrilled about pumpkin-flavored everything to hit the shelves, but us here at CandysDirt.com are over the moon about the return of fall home tour season. Yes, we’ll still hit up a Starbucks for our annual pumpkin spice latte, but nothing quite says “autumn is here!” to us like traipsing through other people’s homes with those weird little hospital booties on.

To help you plan, we’ve compiled a list of can’t miss home tours for this fall. It skews heavily toward midcentury modern and covers quite a bit of territory:

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aiacedars[1]

Tragically, not every project that an architect designs makes its way from concept to reality. Truly, some of the most ground-breaking work that architects do never break ground. However, these designs and concepts deserve recognition, and that’s just what the AIA Dallas Unbuilt Awards will do.

This year’s pop-up exhibition tomorrow, April 28, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. is hosted by Lofty Spaces at 816 Montgomery in the Cedars. You can check out the gallery of unbuilt designs and cast your ballot on your favorites while meeting and mingling with the show’s jurors. Admission is $15 for AIA Dallas members and $20 for the general public.

Jump for more!

aia_unbuilt (53 of 92)[1]

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Dallas is experiencing phenomenal inner city growth. Neighborhoods like Oak Cliff, the Trinity River Corridor, Deep Ellum, Ross Avenue, and the Design District are seeing urban infill like never before, showing up in all scales and types.

inner city growth

Robert Meckfessel, FAIA

These changes are remaking the city and opening up new opportunities for residents and businesses alike. But when we look at housing, retail, restaurants, office, and streetscapes, what are the traits that make for good infill and connectivity for these areas?

These are the questions posed for the next Dallas Architecture Forum event, a panel presented in collaboration with Preservation Dallas called Remaking the City.

The event will be moderated by Robert McFessel, FAIA, President of DSGN Associates and past president of leading organizations involved with the quality of the built environment, including the Dallas Architecture Forum, Preservation Dallas, LaReunion TX, and AIA Dallas.

McFessel currently serves on the boards of LaReunion TX, The Trinity Trust, Trinity Commons Foundation, DoCoMoMo U.S., Greater Dallas Planning Council, and the Advisory Board of the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Panelists include:

  • Edwin Cabannis: Owner of the Kessler Theater
  • Katherine Seale: Chair of the City of Dallas Landmark Commission and Past Director of Preservation Dallas
  • Evan Sheets: Senior Urban Designer at Dallas City Design Studio
  • Dan Shipley, FAIA: Founder and Principal at Shipley Architects

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Neo Pastiche

Neo Pastiche Banality.  The Tuna Noodle Casserole of Housing

Let’s face it, homes have always been a collection of areas for cooking, sleeping, and primping surrounding a common family or group dining and living area. Sometimes these functions occurred in a single room and sometimes a series of rooms. The more schmancy you get, the more specialized the rooms and the larger the rooms become.  At some point, homes can become their own self-contained city like Barbra Streisand’s underground shopping center or overly task-specific like Candy Spelling’s gift wrapping room.

Yes, differing eras have sought to either open or close off rooms. Interestingly, in addition to overall wealth, it seems that what a society thinks of its women has something to do with interior spaces. When women were thought to be barefoot, pregnant and without meaningful opinions, homes were more closed off.

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design competitions

This princess needs her own castle, er, dog house, with the Bark + Build Design/Build Competition, benefiting SPCA of Texas. Photo: spilltojill via Creative Commons

Two local design competitions are calling on Dallas-area professionals to show off their best work this summer.

The Bark + Build Doghouse Design/Build Competition, presented by AIA Dallas and TEXO Association, calls on architects and contractors to team up and design haute houses for dogs. All proceeds benefit the SPCA of Texas Home for the Holidays event.

All entries will be judged on both design and construction quality by jury panel, with various award categories, and displayed at NorthPark Center from Nov. 16 – Dec. 7. While on public display, buy a raffle ticket or two—all proceeds benefit SPCA of Texas.

The competition serves to foster relationships between architecture and contractor firms and raise awareness and support for SPCA of Texas’ mission, to provide every animal exceptional care and a loving home and is the leading animal welfare agency in North Texas. Register your team or learn more by clicking here.

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M3 Container Hotel

This hotel designed by Beck Architecture is made up of 150 shipping containers.

Dallas architects are designing amazing, mold-breaking structures for sites here and abroad, but not every design becomes more than a concept. Still, good ideas are worth recognizing, so the Dallas Chapter of the American Institute of Architects set out to highlight some of the most amazing unbuilt structures designed by Dallas firms.

Design award recipients were selected by a jury of globally recognized architects and brands. Jurists included Jenny Wu (Oyler Wu Collaborative), Elizabeth Whittaker, AIA (Merge Architects), and Adam Yarinsky, FAIA (Architecture Research Office). Of the 34 entries received, five received awards based on its response to cultural, social, environmental, and contextual challenges.

Two of the winners were conceptual designs for the Dallas Holocaust Museum, one is a striking airport terminal in China, while another is a pavilion that responds to sound. Other entries include a re-design of the first floor of the Belo building at 400 Record Street, urban retail infill on Fort Worth Avenue, and a cool hotel constructed with 150 shipping containers. Residential projects include a modern residence in Preston Hollow on Belmead, as well as a prototype for efficient multi-family housing dubbed “Grotto.” We also love the beautiful, modern concept for a public library in Vickery Park.

Vickery Meadow Branch Library

Oglesby Greene designed a bright and open public library branch for Vickery Meadow.

The May 28 opening at Life in Deep Ellum launched the exhibition of these unique concepts, which will be on display until July 11. You can select your favorite design for one of the People’s Choice Awards, which will be announced at the exhibition’s closing.

“The 2015 Unbuilt Design Award submissions highlight the incredibly diverse work being done by Dallas architects in communities around the world,” said Heath May, AIA, of HKS, Inc. May is the AIA Dallas Design Award Committee Chair. “This year’s winning projects exemplify beautiful and inspiring design that are responsive to contemporary issues.”

Jump to see more of these innovative designs!
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The SMU-led seismic study of North Texas revealed that hydraulic fracturing injection wells most likely activated a dormant fault, leaving the town of Azle all shook up. (map: SMU)

The SMU-led seismic study of North Texas revealed that hydraulic fracturing injection wells most likely activated a dormant fault, leaving the town of Azle all shook up. (map: SMU)

Did you feel that earthquake this morning? We definitely did, and it happened just as I was dropping off my preschooler in Lakewood. The tremor, a 2.7 magnitude quake near Farmers Branch according to the United States Geological Survey map, made me wonder if my son’s school was built to withstand a significant earthquake. It’s something we have to start thinking about as our area is shaken physically and mentally by the growing frequency of seismic activity.

Existing structures are one of the biggest challenges earthquake-prone areas face, as many buildings are constructed without the proper seismic reinforcement. Masonry buildings, ones without steel crossbeam or framing, can pose a significant risk to inhabitants. Considering the recent report from SMU linking our recent spate of earthquakes to hydraulic fracturing and injection wells, should North Texas update its building codes and best practices so that more buildings can withstand the tremors?

If you want to be part of the discussion, AIA Dallas will host a panel from noon to 1 p.m. tomorrow at the Dallas Center for Architecture. The panel discussion will feature Jarod Fancher, Assoc. AIA, Barry Beazley, AIA, Bruce W. Rachel, AIA, and Linda Brown, Assoc. AIA. The group will discuss the science surrounding earthquakes, the history and geology of our region, and seismic building design.

Be sure to register in advance, as it will likely fill up.