We all know the Gold Crest on Turtle Creek.  Even though it’s just 11 stories tall, its design overshadows many taller buildings on the boulevard.  It was built in 1964 by George Dahl and it was his home for the last decades of his life.

Fresh on the market after over 34 years with the same owner is unit 1101 on the penthouse level.  While other buildings belled and whistled their penthouse levels with jumbo combined units, the 11th floor of the Gold Crest is like any other. It’s a two-bedroom, two-bathroom unit with 1,630 square feet and listed with Janet Rone of Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate for $725,000.  Don’t bother clicking on the link for pictures, there’s one and it’s of the exterior. But I do have the floor plan and my crayons …

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FLW Rogers Lacy 2

Having run around a lot of high-rises in Dallas over the years as a potential buyer, open house voyeur, and CandysDirt.com roving reporter, people ask me what I think of “X” building. With that in mind, here’s my list of the top Dallas high-rises in different categories.

1. Best Unbuilt high-rise: Rogers Lacy Hotel

Long before I moved to Dallas, I saw the Rogers Lacy Hotel images in a 1985 book about architect Frank Lloyd Wright titled, “Treasures of Taliesin: Seventy-Seven Unbuilt Designs” by Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer.

The 64-story mixed-use building was to have housed a hotel on the first nine floors before transitioning to a stepped-back high-rise column containing residential condos/apartments.  Wright didn’t think much of Dallas summers or its 1940s cityscape and so the glass exterior was to have been double-thickness with translucent insulation between the panels.  This way, light was transmitted without having to see the outside.  Some panels were moveable and some were operable windows, but the general “face” of the building was towards the interior where an amazing atrium was to have been. Lush plants and interior-facing windows offered what Wright thought were the best “views” of Dallas.  The building was never built because during negotiations to convince oilman Rogers Lacy of the daring design, Mr. Lacy died.

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