A home that didn’t pull out of the Paris Accord

I like to walk with a purpose, an endpoint. Sunday was just such a day when, as a real estate writer, a cool open house is a great endpoint.  One option asked me to “imagine living in an Italian villa” (yeah, no). Then I came across the walk-worthy 9317 Midway, which looks very modern (good), but also has a fascinating story to tell, which was hinted at when I saw the rooftop solar collectors and Tesla gear in the photos. Not to be outdone by their environmental fortitude, I slipped on my shoes and headed to the open house (so there!).

The home contains five bedrooms and four full bathrooms over 4,257 square feet. It rests on nearly two-thirds of an acre (112’ x 237’ lot). It’s listed with Robert Plessinger of Keller-Williams Park Cities for $1.75 million.

The home is on Midway just north of Northwest Highway. For those in less urban environments who like a little walkability, the home of across the street from the strip center housing Fernando’s and La Madeleine restaurants and other retail outlets including the coming soon Central Market. Oh, and did I mention that this stretch of Midway has sidewalks!

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William Armstrong’s Cragside home was pioneering in its use of renewable energy.

Part of the age we live in seems to be rediscovering that old ways of doing things were actually better. For example, the recent realization that the makeup of towns to encourage vibrancy through density and the support of multi-income levels versus single-strata communities is better – a millennia-old concept only deviated from with the advent of the car and suburban tract developments. Part of the human condition seems to be learning from (some) mistakes.

In the 1860s, William Armstrong was “green” before it was dreamt of. In addition to planting 7 million (yes, million) trees at his Cragside estate, he was big into renewable energy at the dawn of the electrical era. He said coal “was used wastefully and extravagantly in all its applications” and that Britain would run out of coal in 200 years. He was also keen to harness solar power saying that a single acre located in sunny climates would generate the power equivalent to 4,000 horses toiling for nine hours a day.

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