oil prices west texas

New numbers are in for the January real estate market in Midland, and the experts say the drop in oil prices are continuing to affect housing prices.

In Midland, the Local Market Monitor Report analysts predict a 1 percent decrease in home values over the next 12 months. Nationally, prices are forecast to increase by 4.4 percent.

Read the whole story over at MidlandDirt.com!

 

midland home values

The December housing numbers from Local Market Monitor Report are not painting a rosy picture of the real estate market in Midland, and home values are forecast to decrease over the next 12 months.

Since their peak in the first quarter of 2015, home prices in Midland have fallen by 3 percent. The average home price in this market is currently $179,091.

Over the past two years, the real estate market in Midland has gone from relentlessly enthusiastic, to more reserved, as the slump in the crude oil market drags on. On Monday, oil prices fell to their lowest level in 12 years, and futures of West Texas intermediate crude for February delivery came in at $31.41 a barrel, a 5.3 percent decrease.

“In June 2014, you had to shell out $110 to buy a barrel of Brent crude. By early 2015, that had plunged to $60,” writes Brad Plumer in his piece today for Vox Energy & Environment. “Today, it costs just $30 to buy a barrel of oil — a level not seen since 2004. It’s a staggering decline.”

Read the whole story over at MidlandDirt.com!

 

 

midland odessa real estate marketFourth quarter numbers from Local Market Monitor Report are in for the Midland and Odessa real estate markets and the enthusiasm is being dialed back for both markets.

Notably, they have lowered the investment score for Midland to 2.7, making is speculative. Odessa’s number is now 4.9, making it medium risk. Reports earlier this year had both markets much higher.

Read the whole story over on MidlandDirt.com!

 

 

Two new reports paint a bright picture of the housing market in Midland and Odessa now and for the next three years.

The Local Monitor Reports, released today, cite a 7 percent increase in Midland home prices over the last 12 months, which puts the average home price at $183,463. In Odessa, prices have gone up 5 percent over the last year and the current average home price is $210,980. In the last three years, home prices were up 10 percent in both markets.

The good news doesn’t stop there.

Read the whole story over on MidlandDirt.com!

 

 

home prices

Photo: Dan Moyle

Two new reports from Local Monitor Report are projecting big increases in home values in Midland and Odessa over the next three years, almost double the national average. Prices are predicted to rise even more.

Home values for Midland are forecast to increase by 8 percent over the next 12 months—compare that to national forecast of 4.6 percent. In the second and third years, values are forecast to increase 9 percent each year, a 26 percent increase in three years.

Midland home prices are projected to increase even more, at 30 percent over the next three years. In the last 12 months, prices have gone up by 7 percent, bringing the average home price in Midland to $183,463.

In Odessa, the report is predicting a 7 percent increase in home values over the next 12 months, and 9 percent in each of the next two years. That’s a total projected increase of at least 25 percent.

Odessa home prices are forecast to increase more, at 29 percent over the next three years. Odessa home prices have increased by 5 percent in the last 12 months, and the average home price is now $210,980.

All this adds up to a “low risk” categorization by Local Monitor Report for real estate investments in both Midland and Odessa, good news for homeowners and investors, alike.

See the full story at MidlandDirt.com.

Photo courtesy Brian Dooley via Creative Commons

Photo courtesy Brian Dooley via Creative Commons

Strong economic factors, job gains, and population increases have experts predicting strong growth in North Texas home prices in 2015, and a 35 percent increase in home prices over the next three years in the Dallas-Plano-Irving areas.

Local Market Monitor, Inc. released its December 2014 local market reports for North Texas, looking at factors like jobs, migration, housing permits, local market risk premium, and average home prices. Based on those analytics, they say home prices will likely grow 11 percent in the eastern counties of North Texas and 8 percent in the western counties over the next 12 months. Nationally, prices are forecast to increase by 6.3 percent.

They’ve extended their forecast two and three years, as well. In the eastern DFW counties, home values are predicted to increase 11 percent in 2016 and 10 percent in 2017.

In the western counties, home values are expected to increase 8 percent in both 2016 and 2017. The report predicts home prices to increase 25 percent over the next three years, noting that market is currently underpriced 17 percent relative to income.

County level forecast for Home Values

These reports echo the sentiments of local realtors and real estate experts, who have been crowing about strong North Texas job growth, more buyer and seller confidence, continued low interest rates, and investor demand. Jump to read more!

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Local Market Monitor February

The Local Market Monitor Report for the Dallas, Plano, and Irving areas calls the real estate market “Low Risk.” This is echoing what we’ve heard since November — prices are up, homes are on the market for a 30 to 60 days, inventory is low.

The report forecasts a 3 percent increase in home values over the next twelve months, and says the recession is pretty much over for our area, as jobs are growing, too, thanks to our large finance sector. So there are fewer homes on the market, more demand for homes, and a job growth rate that is almost twice the national rate …

 

That got me wondering. In some areas, I’m seeing the same signs in the same front yards that have been there for months. If the market has such awesome momentum, why aren’t some of these perfectly fine homes in an otherwise great area not selling?

Take this cute, well-preserved midcentury modern in the Ash Creek area of East Dallas. We’ve said (pretty much ad nauseum) that this area has amazing momentum and is growing like gangbusters. Still, this steal of a deal isn’t selling. I wonder why?

What do you think? Are buyers being more picky than normal despite the low inventory? What are you seeing buyers turn their noses up at?

 

 

Local Market Monitor February

The Local Market Monitor Report for the Dallas, Plano, and Irving areas calls the real estate market “Low Risk.” This is echoing what we’ve heard since November — prices are up, homes are on the market for a 30 to 60 days, inventory is low.

The report forecasts a 3 percent increase in home values over the next twelve months, and says the recession is pretty much over for our area, as jobs are growing, too, thanks to our large finance sector. So there are fewer homes on the market, more demand for homes, and a job growth rate that is almost twice the national rate …

 

That got me wondering. In some areas, I’m seeing the same signs in the same front yards that have been there for months. If the market has such awesome momentum, why aren’t some of these perfectly fine homes in an otherwise great area not selling?

Take this cute, well-preserved midcentury modern in the Ash Creek area of East Dallas. We’ve said (pretty much ad nauseum) that this area has amazing momentum and is growing like gangbusters. Still, this steal of a deal isn’t selling. I wonder why?

What do you think? Are buyers being more picky than normal despite the low inventory? What are you seeing buyers turn their noses up at?