Margaret Chambers downtown Dallas highrise study

The study of a downtown Dallas highrise, designed by Margaret Chambers. Photo: Dan Piassick

Interior designer Margaret Chambers is a pillar in the Dallas design community. She formed Chambers Interiors & Associates, Inc. 23 years ago after dreaming of having her own business, becoming known for her ability to confidently mix different styles, techniques, and cultures for her clients.

In those years, she’s come to regard Dallas as the ideal place for her thriving business, which employs five professionals, with every designer in the office having a degree in interior design.

Margaret Chambers

Margaret Chambers

“It is really a perfect place to practice interior design—people are very aware of interior designers and appreciate their ability to transform their home or office into a wonderful place to live and work,” Chambers said. “In Dallas, people can see a difference when a professional interior designer has created a space. In addition, Dallas is an international city and is continuing to grow, making it an exciting place for design to serve a wide range of people.”

Chambers’ work is award-winning, and has been published in more than 20 industry magazines, including Traditional Home, Texas Home & Living, and D Home. She is also a friend of CandysDirt, telling our readers about everything from kitchen design and investing in antiques to picking a chandelier and the best strategies to use to get your home on the market and sold.

You’ll find Chambers’ work in Highland Park, Preston Hollow, Plano, and other North Texas homes of discriminating clients, spanning a range of styles.

“I always try to make my work as classical and timeless as possible, whether I am doing a contemporary, transitional, or traditional home,” she said. “I want each project to have its own unique style that reflects the client’s unique taste. I also love to add in furniture, art, and accessories that are handmade. I feel these add warmth and a soul to the interior; they bring with them a history that enriches a space.”

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Thad Reeves

The Bley Sleeping House in San Marcos. Photo: Craig Kuhner

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Thad Reeves, AIA, is a co-founder of A.GRUPPO Architects, an office positioned as a vehicle for collaboration between themselves and other designers, architects, fabricators, and most importantly, clients.

He received his Masters of Architecture from the University of Texas at Arlington in 1997. During this time, he studied in Spain and traveled widely in Europe. His interest in the influence of historic European architecture on contemporary design has led him on numerous architectural pilgrimages throughout Western and Central Europe, Australia, and the U.S.

Thad Reeves, AIA

Thad Reeves

After graduating, Reeves began his career with RTKL Associates in Dallas, where he was part of both local and international award-winning projects. He later worked with Oglesby Greene Architects, where he honed his skills on well-crafted, smaller-scale projects.

In 2003, Reeves went entrepreneurial, helping to form the offices of Thomas Krahenbuhl and Truett Roberts Architects, continuing to work on commercial and residential projects at all phases of the design process.

It was in 2005 that Reeves began teaching at his alma mater, UT Arlington, where he taught for ten years (he is currently taking a break, as his business has really taken off). This was also when he co-founded A. GRUPPO.

CandysDirt: You have an interest in the influence of European architecture on contemporary design. How do you see that happening—or not—in Dallas?

Thad Reeves: My interest in European architecture, both historic and contemporary, has to do more with ideas and where they come from. In Europe, they’ve been dealing with buildings in the urban context for far longer than we have. I think there is a lot to learn from how the Europeans approach issues of density, transportation, and public space.

I’ve realized that I’m not as excited about a lot of new buildings. Many are very nicely done, but lack something that I haven’t quit identified yet. A few years ago in New York, I realized there were a lot more things to learn from how someone (probably not an architect) resolved a gate or connection between two buildings rather pragmatically than something considered “high design.” Ideas are all around us, so it’s fun to catalog those and see where they will pop up in our work.

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