Election

Legos made of Jello. This is important.

It’s 12:19 a.m. on what is now Sunday, and I just filed my election story. I’m saying this because it’s cause for celebration — I believe it was almost 2 a.m. last time. But I also realized that because I have a surplus of awake time now, as well as a surplus of snark, it’s a great time to review what I’ve learned in my time covering elections, and in my time covering this particular election.

Ready? (more…)

election

Dallas mayoral candidates Scott Griggs (left) and Eric Johnson (right) will face off in a runoff election in June.

With nine candidates vying to become the next mayor of Dallas, it was a foregone conclusion that there would be a runoff. But that doesn’t mean election night wasn’t without its surprises.

Early on, despite the crowded field, Johnson and Griggs stayed ahead of the field, with Johnson maintaining about 20 percent of the vote, and Griggs hovering between 17 and 18 percent. Mike Ablon and Lynn McBee remained clustered around the 14 percent mark for much of the night, rounding out the top four contenders.

At a watch party, a smiling Johnson told supporters that he and wife Tanika were on their way home to see their children, because tomorrow “starts the first day of the new campaign.” (more…)

ElectionWith less than 500 votes separating Joanna Cattanach and Republican incumbent Morgan Meyer in the State House 108 race, the outcome of the race will continue to be uncertain for a few more days.

With all the precincts in — but not all the provisional and mail-in ballots counted — Meyer is currently ahead of Cattanach by 440 votes — the slimmest of margins. The 108th includes the Park Cities and parts of Dallas.

Meyer, an attorney, is considered to be a moderate Republican of the Joe Straus’ vein. Cattanach, a college professor, spoke candidly during the campaign of her experiences as a foster child and her advocacy for women and children.

“Every vote matters and we are determined to make sure the correct outcome of this race includes all ballots including provisional and mail-in ballots,” campaign spokesperson Jacob Limon said Wednesday evening. “As such, our campaign will work with the County elections department until ALL ballots are counted.” (more…)

Election

Voters lined up at the Oak Lawn library Election Day, with more than 400 people casting ballots by lunchtime (photo by Bethany Erickson)

Frisco, Richardson and Dallas ISD Pass Property Tax Increases

  • Allred bests Sessions in U.S. Rep. District 32 race
  • All four propositions on the ballot for Dallas ISD passed
  • Johnson beats Rinaldi, Johnson beats Luby Ryan
  • Carolyn King Arnold, Keyaira Saunders headed to a runoff

While Democrats came surprisingly (to many) close to winning statewide seats on Election Day, ultimately candidates came just short of besting the Republican party across the board in statewide races. How close were the races, despite the losses? In 16 years, Democratic candidates in statewide races have received 45 percent of the vote only twice — last night, nine of them did.

“Today is not a bad day,” Mike Collier, Democratic candidate for Lieutenant Governor, said Tuesday night. “We showed Texas that if you campaign on issues that Texans care about, you can have a strong showing in this state.”

But while the “Beto Effect” may not have bestowed a win on its namesake, it was still impacting races, with the El Paso congressman’s get out the vote effort being attributed to down-ballot flips in several congressional, state, and local races.

After record early voting, Election Day polling locations varied from “ghost towns,” as one poll greeter said, to steadily busy. Turnout increased as schools let out, and as people got off work, volunteers said.

Election Day

After a bit of turmoil during early voting, the Lakeside Activity Center in Mesquite was actually calm and congenial Election Day.

Measures for 13-cent Tax Ratification Elections passed in both Richardson ISD and Dallas ISD. Frisco ISD voters approved a 13-cent tax swap that will move 13 cents from the debt service column to the maintenance and operations column.   (more…)

NobodyNow I know you’re probably already squawking — I can hear it from here — about this “Nobody” business in this headline. “NOBODY? Record turnout, lady, in early voting — how is that NOBODY votes?”

But hear me out.

If nobody votes, then Nobody will win. And that’s not just brain-breaking hyperbole that the grammarian in me is grappling with. Cartographers Philip Kearney and Jim Herries used Census data to plot nonvoters, and made a really not-ground-breaking-at-all discovery: Nobody (if Nobody was a candidate) would’ve beaten the pants off Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in the last election.

In fact, Nobody would’ve won 445 electoral votes to Trump’s 21 and Clinton’s 72.

To make the editor in me happy, though, can we just say that when people don’t vote, Nobody the Candidate wins?

Now yes, early voting turnout statewide has been incredible. And seriously, even though the lines were long occasionally, voting early is quite possibly the easiest way we currently have available to vote — you can go anywhere in the county, line up, cast your ballot, and walk back out, possibly with a cool new sticker.

In the 30 counties in Texas that contain the bulk of the state’s registered voters, turnout for early voting exceeded the election turnout for the entire 2014 midterm election, data compiled by the Texas Tribune showed.

In Dallas County, there are 1,335,313 registered voters this election, and 529,521 cast their votes early, or 39 percent, compared to 214,312 in 2014. In Tarrant County, 465,817 of the county’s 1,122,597 registered voters (or 41.5 percent) voted early. In Collin County, almost half (49.4 percent) of the county’s 579,893 registered voters voted early. Forty-six percent of Denton County’s 497,490 voters have already cast ballots. (more…)

(Photo by iStock)

It’s Election Day for both party primaries, and if you haven’t voted yet, you have about seven hours left to do so. A whole slew of local and statewide races are on both ballots, and many of your seemingly not-big-deal votes actually do have wider-reaching implications.

We’ll be talking returns over on our Facebook page beginning at 7 p.m., and will have a comprehensive write up later this evening once winners are looking firm. So go vote, grab a glass of wine, and fire up the Facebook.

Don’t have Facebook? Hate social media? Feel free to comment on this post about what you’ve seen, reactions to returns, etc.

Dallas County

Dallas county voters opted to shutter Dallas County Schools last night with 58 percent of the vote (Photo courtesy Dallas County Schools).

Less than 7 percent of Dallas County registered voters cast ballots to decide the fate of Dallas County Schools — and those 83,209 voters (out of about 1.3 million registered voters in the county) chose to shutter the embattled school bus provider.

“I think we put up a good fight given that we had zero money to fight this while our opponents spent thousands of dollars,” DCS board president Gloria Levario told The Dallas Morning News. “It will be business as usual for our employees, but that’s all I know for now.”

Levario also said that all DCS employees will continue to have jobs through the end of the school year — buses will continue to run.

Now that 58 percent of voters have opted to pull the plug on the agency, the current DCS board and superintendent will be replaced by a committee made up of representatives from school districts and appointees from the state comptroller’s office by Nov. 15. That committee will begin working with the districts that use DCS to unspool the agency and end operations after the school year, distributing DCS assets among the school districts.

Districts currently utilizing DCS for bus service are Aledo ISD, Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD, Cedar Hill ISD, DeSoto ISD, Dallas ISD, Highland Park ISD, Irving ISD, Lancaster ISD, and Richardson ISD.

(more…)

vote

The fate of the embattled Dallas County Schools is on today’s ballot – but several other important things are on there, too (Photo courtesy Dallas County Schools).

Today is Election Day, and since there aren’t any candidates, very few will likely bother to vote, despite the fact that some very important things are on the ballot.

How can I say that with such confidence? Early voting totals show that a little more than 2 percent of registered voters in Dallas County have voted so far.

I don’t think it will get much better today.

In the off chance that you haven’t voted yet and weren’t planning to, I thought I’d outline what your Dallas County ballot will look like, and what you’ll be voting on. Full disclosure: I waited until today to vote as well.

This isn’t meant to be endorsements of any of the measures on the ballot, but instead is a rundown on what you will see. We’ll go in the order the measures are found on the ballot, too. (more…)