Dallas City Hall

Dallas City Hall will host the Dallas Homeowners League Boot Camp on Saturday, Aug. 15.

Ever wondered who to call when the storm drain starts to flood your street, how you can facilitate historic preservation, or what ways you can support your neighborhood Dallas ISD campuses?

You can answer these questions and more on Saturday during the annual Dallas Homeowners League Boot Camp. The event held from 8:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Dallas City Hall will also include a panel discussion moderated by Dallas Morning News reporter Robert Wilonsky on what neighborhoods need to do in today’s changing urban environment. Expect a lively back-and-forth from panelists Monte Anderson of Options Real Estate, housing expert Mercedes Marquis urban planner and blogger Patrick Kennedy, and D Magazine founder Wick Allison.

Jump to find out how to register.

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MCCAULEY RADAR

I know the colors are pretty, but according to meteorologist Steve McCauley, this radar map makes for ugly weather.

UPDATE: Things just got real. The Weather Channel is in Dallas, according to Robert Wilonsky.

WFAA meteorologist Steve McCauley is saying that according to his readings, tomorrow evening’s weather could very well spawn a few tornadoes.

“Obviously, it is impossible to predict where a tornado will touch down this far in advance,” McCauley said in his Facebook post, “but it is likely that our first TORNADO WATCH will be posted for much of north Texas tomorrow afternoon and evening.

We’ve talked about tornado coverage before, and about how to make sure your homeowners insurance policy is up to date, but considering our recent spate of earthquakes, hail storms, and high winds, perhaps it’s time to revisit your coverage again? And have you given a second thought to installing a storm shelter?

Jump to read McCauley’s full post:

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Trulia Heatmap Tornadoes Dallas

 

(Graphic: Trulia Heatmap From NOAA tornado data)

love what Trulia manages to do with a little data. This company is consistently making the best tools that break down statistical information, helping homebuyers decide which areas best suit their needs. 

Their newest tool, the Natural Hazards heatmaps, are perfect for seismophobics, potamophobics, brontophobics, and pretty much any other weather-related phobia you can think of. With data from the USGS, FEMA, NOAA, and the Forest Service, Trulia has created color-coded models showing which areas pose the greatest risk for these natural disasters.

Of course, if you plan buy wherever you want — data be damned — I’m sure these maps will help you negotiate your homeowner’s insurance policy. Take a minute to click around on their Trulia Local page for Dallas. It’s interesting stuff.

On the flipside, if you want to avoid natural disasters altogether, Trulia Economist Jed Kolko has compiled a list of the top-10 U.S. cities least likely to be hit with an act of God. Topping that list is Syracuse, N.Y., with Cleaveland and Akron, Ohio, in second and third, respectively. Fourth is Buffalo, N.Y., and fifth is Bethesda-Rockville-Frederick, Md.