Entry Healing Rift envisions a series of underground communal pools straddling the Korean DMZ

On May 17, the Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects will be holding their annual awards for projects that haven’t been built and/or have been designed by students.  It’s a great way to see projects that for one reason or another (like working on a school project) haven’t been built.

What’s also fun is that the public can vote on their favorite design via a specially setup website. The finalist group showcases 43 designs that come from across the globe (although being the Dallas AIA, 23 come from Texas). Each visit can only clock in one vote. When faced with good architecture, I generally follow the potato chip philosophy … I find it difficult to eat (or choose) just one.

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Architecture on Tap

The Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects sponsors a lively series, Architecture on Tap, which is having its final event this week.

How big is your digital footprint?” will explore four perspectives on the use of technology and social media within the practice of architecture.

The three panelists will be Bob Borson, AIA, of Malone Maxwell Borson ArchitectsRick del Monte, FAIA, of Beck Group; and Eddie Fortuna, AIA, of Omniplan.

Discussion topics include:

  • What effect does the use of social media have on the studio environment?
  • How has the increased ease to connect with content from across the world affect the way we view the built environment?
  • ​At what point is our use of digital interaction within the work place too much?

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Farmers Market Loft

Lofts tend to feel big because of high ceilings, tall windows, and few interior walls dividing up the space. But today’s Thursday Three Hundred really IS a big space—2,296 square feet with polished concrete floors, exposed ductwork, and huge iron windows that hinge open.

Unit 208 at 2220 Canton St. is located near the downtown Dallas Farmers Market in the historic Olive & Myers Furniture Company Building, constructed in 1925. Now called 2220 Canton, the building was renovated for residential living in 1996 by Corgan & Associates (same folks who did the Adam Hats Lofts nearby in Deep Ellum).

Their beautiful work won a Building Design award from the Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects. It is one of the few remaining examples of factory architecture in downtown Dallas and the property is now listed as a City of Dallas Landmark.

Farmers Market Loft

Not only does 2220 Canton offer an incredible location in the southwest part of downtown, check out that view from the rooftop pool deck above. Wow. Residents have access to a concierge during normal business hours, as well as a fitness center in the building and 1/3-mile walking track on the roof.

This unusual loft is newly listed by Holly Bock at Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International for $390,350.

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Robert Raymond

Photo: Michael Palumbo

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Robert Raymond

Robert Raymond

Robert W. Raymond, AIA, moved to Dallas in 1981 after completing his Masters in Architecture at the University of Michigan. He has never lived more than a few blocks from White Rock Lake in East Dallas, where he built his family’s home and made the transition to residential architecture in 2000.

“The house turned out great and my wife and daughters are still speaking to me,” he said.

With his firm, Raymond Design, he has built houses in neighborhoods ranging from Preston Hollow and the Peninsula, to Richardson and Southlake.

He was named Young Architect of the Year in 1989 by the Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architecture, served on the board of trustees of the Dallas Architectural Foundation from 2004 to 2006, and has served on the board of trustees of the White Rock Lake Conservancy from 2008 to present.

CandysDirt: You spent 20 years working on big buildings, like hotels and hospitals, moving into residential design in 2000 by designing and building your family house. What appeals to you about residential architecture?

Rob Raymond: There are two main reasons. First, the ability to work from beginning to end on a project, from the initial concept to final construction.

Second, and most rewarding, is working so closely with the client on projects that are near and dear to them. With corporate clients building hotels or hospitals, it’s a business transaction and commercial architecture, in a big firm, is more specialized and compartmentalized. You rarely get the chance to go from inception of idea to ribbon cutting.

With residential architecture, I’m usually working with couples and I joke that it’s part residential architecture and part marriage counseling. It’s fun to get to know people, understand them, and connect with them.

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Will Alex Krieger's vision of a narrow, four-lane parkway next to the Trinity River win over a massive toll road?

Will Alex Krieger’s vision of a narrow, four-lane parkway next to the Trinity River win over a massive toll road?

Last week, the Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects took a couple of days to really home in on the challenges that Dallas must overcome to be a sustainable and attractive city in the long term. A city that can compete with other areas that offer more holistic transportation solutions in an urban environment. Those lofty goals were all addressed at the organization’s Mobility Summit.

Long a car-centric city, the next generation of Dallas residents are upending the long-held belief that commuting is a forgone conclusion, measuring distance in hours door-to-door. Instead, more and more thinkers are looking critically at Dallas and our eight-lane highways, our toll roads, and our elevated high-speed thoroughfares.

As usual, Robert Wilonsky (who, I swear writes 99 percent of the copy on the Dallasnews.com site) did a fabulous job breaking down the big issues and discussions at the event, and the breakthroughs brought on by gathering so many people passionate about Dallas’ design future. The most impact was felt by Harvard professor and urban planner Alex Krieger, a co-author of Dallas’ Balanced Vision Plan, when he backed off his support of a road within the levees of the Trinity River.

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CherokeeTrail

We live for the AIA Dallas Tour of Homes, and the homes featured on this year’s tour do not disappoint. We’re talking about some of the most amazing modern homes and unbelieveable renovations by innovative architects across Dallas.

The is a home tour you don’t want to miss, either, and lucky for you, we’re giving away a pair of tickets to this amazing event. The tour, which runs this weekend, Nov. 2 and 3, is organized by the Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects. These are the homes that architects go gaga over, so expect clean lines, unique geometry and neutral palettes.

Of course, there are some incredible renovations, too, including 3615 Gillespie Street Unit C (below). Designed by Mitchell Garman architects, this condo is just gorgeous. Tons of wood offset with bright white paint and colorful accents make this unit a vision of Midcentury Modern revived.

GillespieUnitC

“The 1958-era condo has wonderful bones – full-height glass, but very private, small urban condo in the midst of the city,” said owner Kelly Mitchell. “We took out the walls around the kitchen to open it up and make it useful for the way we live today. The detailing and materials are modern, yet fitting for the era and style of the original building.”

There’s another unit in the building on the tour, too, and the take on the space is completely unique.

If you’re looking for an interesting play on lines, textures, and transparency, you will have to pick your jaw up from the floor after you’ve seen 21 Winding Lake Drive by Smitharc Architects (below). This home abounds with minimalist and Asian-style influences, with walls that create privacy without blocking light, not unlike a shoji screen.

Winding Lake

“The Winding Lake house is a study in contrasts: natural cedar cladding alongside crisply rendered stucco and glass, huge windows that provide amply shaded private views, sculptural forms that envelope rather than displace space, a sense of expansiveness despite its confined zero-lot-line site,” said Jason Smith, AIA, of Smitharc Architects.

Of course, these are only a couple of the 10 amazing homes on this year’s tour. Want to see them all? Comment below on which home is your favorite and then send an email with your contact information to jo@candysdirt.com. We’ll choose the winner tomorrow!