With the Central Market at Preston and Royal currently closed, the absence of healthy, no-prep meals is acutely felt in Preston Hollow. To remedy that, H-E-B has brought one of their disaster response fleet to the Preston Royal Shopping Center. The mobile kitchen arrived today and will be available to serve meals to first responders, construction workers, and neighbors affected by the tornado through Saturday, Oct. 26, the company said. 

Meals are free of charge, as are the complimentary cleaning supply kits the company will hand out to the first 500 homeowners starting tomorrow morning. H-E-B will also have produce, snacks, and waters available on-site through Tuesday. 

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August 2019 issue is a must-have for high-end appliance shoppers.

Consumer Reports is a magazine most of us don’t read often enough. Sure, when we need a new TV or car, we scour the library for back issues, but this is hit and miss. Last weekend, sipping a cool drink outdoors at a local watering hole, I needed armor, so I bought and brought the latest Consumer Reports. So interesting was the August issue that my drink’s ice melted long before I’d finished reading.

For the first time, the magazine issued a report on appliance reliability by the manufacturer. Even more enticing is the inclusion of ultra-premium brands like Miele, Thermador, Sub-Zero, and Viking, which often get left out due to a lack of data compared with brands selling tons more units like GE or LG.

While not to be confused with the organization’s ratings on appliance usability and features, reliability is clearly as important when buying a car as a refrigerator. The surprising yet unsurprising thing was the general consensus by appliance makers that 10 years of life is good enough. Some ultra-premium players like Miele and Sub-Zero/Wolf claim 20 years of useful life while washer/dryer brand Speed Queen touts 25 years.

Of course, that’s not to say that consumers will have 10, 20, or 25 years of flawless service from their appliance. The organization reports that 40 percent of refrigerators will require some type of servicing within their first five years – ranges, the most reliable class of appliance will see 25 percent requiring service.

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Oak Lawn Committee

Conceptual Image

Tuesday night’s Oak Lawn Committee meeting was chockablock with five projects. The first peek will be of the proposed Central Market in the perennial unsuccessful supermarket location on McKinney between the Lemmon split. You may recall it as Albertsons or more recently Minyards. At first glance, this is pretty spanky and cool, but the devil is in the details.

It’s proposed to be a whopping big development. There would be a five-level podium covering 95 percent of the parcel that balances two 360’ towers on opposing corners. The larger of the two towers would be a 21-story office building while the other would be an as yet unspecified mix of office, hotel and/or multi-family.

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Beginning in 2014, Central Market parent HEB began snapping up parcels on the city block bounded by Lemmon and Bowser Avenues between Reagan and Throckmorton Streets. Their intent was to open a Central Market. That plan has been abandoned for what I last heard was a Central Market planned for the old Albertson’s location on Lemmon and McKinney Avenues.

The main reason the deal failed was zoning. The parcels facing Lemmon Avenue are zoned for commercial operations while the Bowser-facing lots were zoned for residential use. The Oak Lawn Committee told HEB there was no way they’d support a commercial encroachment into a residential area. I’m sure the fear was that if they’d said “yes” here, other Lemmon Avenue businesses would want to convert the residential backs of their blocks to commercial too. (more…)

HEB

Are we getting one of these or no? (Photo by Dave Stone/Flickr)

It all started with one neighbor in the Preston Hollow/Midway Hollow area excitedly telling others via social media that a cashier at Central Market told her that 100 percent, no doubt about it, the Sunfresh Market site on Northwest Highway and Midway Road that was one of the sites H-E-B (also the parent company of Central Market) picked up was absolutely going to be an H-E-B and that only one site Uptown would become a Central Market.

Alrighty then. I filed it on my list of things to look into on Monday and continued my weekend chores.

But then another neighbor posted an email she got from H-E-B corporate, asking for an update. The email – which was signed by the H-E-B/Central Market director of public affairs Mabrie Jackson – said, “While no announcement has been formally made regarding all of the real estate H-E-B/Central Market acquired from Sunfresh, I can tell you that you will be very pleased around the end of summer 2017.”

Well, butter my butt and call me a biscuit. This sounds intriguing. So I fired off my own inquiry to Jackson to see if I could confirm this and maybe get a few more details.

“I have no details finalized on all of the Sunfresh properties to share, but I can confirm that the properties purchased were being considered for our Central Market format only,” Jackson said. She also told me to check back after Thanksgiving.

So I guess those tea leaves are a little clearer?  If you combine both emails, the picture that emerges is that something is happening next summer, and that ain’t nobody getting an H-E-B (probably – I mean, that could be a bit of misdirection, I suppose, to keep things vague).  Stay tuned, I guess, for more exciting news after Thanksgiving.

 

H-E-B

DFW Internet was set ablaze yesterday after H-E-B announced the purchase of six Sun Fresh Market stores in the area. (Photo by Dave Stone/Flickr)

Monday afternoon, the Dallas-area Internet exploded: It wasn’t just a rumor, the long-desired H-E-B grocery store chain had bought up six Sunfresh Market sites — four in Dallas, one in Grapevine, and one in McKinney.

Interestingly enough, it seems like the drumbeat for expansion may have been happening even earlier than this, judging from this thread in Retail Watchers.

As neighborhood NextDoor pages and Facebook groups filled with the requisite 15 reposts of the same Dallas Morning News article, people began to express their joy at the possibility of the area finally getting the stores that are ubiquitous in Central and Southeast Texas, but not so much around here. They also began to guess about which it would be – Central Market, or H-E-B. (more…)