Reinvestment Fund’s Market Value Analysis of Dallas neighborhoods.

On Monday, the City of Dallas hosted the first of four virtual town hall meetings to gather community input for updates to its Affordable Housing Strategy. It comes less than two weeks after the Jan. 17 Dallas City Council briefing on a Market Value Analysis report by Reinvestment Fund, a nonprofit conducting this research and analysis for cities across the U.S. The data tool is playing a leading role in the development of the City’s new 3-year rolling strategy.

The technology used for the meeting was especially impressive. I’m a little concerned how the city had my number to begin with, but once I opted in by text, it was seamless. I received a call at the appointed time, watched at dallascitynews.net or on Facebook live, could easily ask questions, indicate I wanted calls for future meetings, and even submit my email for followup info – they hired the right consultants to put this together.

The three upcoming meetings will go a little more in-depth than the first topic, “How Residential Development Gets Financed”, or what I’d call “Introduction to the Housing Market.” (more…)

renting in dallas

A new report from Apartment List analyzes the top trends in the 2017 rental market and predicts their impacts in 2018. For example, the report highlights the increase in the homeownership rate after a decade of declines, as well as the decrease in the share of rental units considered affordable to the lowest-income renters. Although affordability remains a concern for those renting in Dallas, Dallas rent growth slowed as the metro added more new rental stock than any other U.S. metro. Dallas rents remain slightly lower than the national average, at $1,100 for a two-bedroom apartment, compared to $1,160 nationwide.

The Dallas market added an estimated 22,851 new rental units in 2017, more than Miami, Phoenix, Boston, and San Francisco combined, and nearly 50 percent more than the number of new units added in 2016. While rental units in Dallas remain in high demand, with 2.4 percent year-over-year rent growth, the large increase in supply decreased occupancy rates from 92.3 percent to 91 percent.

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We need solutions to the North Texas housing crisis before it’s too late

In Part I we learned that there is a Housing Crisis in North Texas

In Part II we learned that New Construction Not Helping Housing Crisis in North Texas

In Part III we learned about the first-hand Struggles of Finding a Home in North Texas

Now let’s talk about solutions to this crisis.  Notice I said “solutions” with an “s” because there isn’t just one fail-safe, simple way that this housing crisis will be solved.  It’s going to take many different methods and changes to see real improvement.

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