Curzon

“You’d be so nice to come home to.”

So said Cole Porter, but famously remembered by the snazzy cover of Frank Sinatra in his heyday. That heyday was in the 1950s, which was when this honey of a house was built. The 1950 build is located only a few blocks from the bustling Westside corridor of Camp Bowie Blvd. However, benefitting from tall old oaks, a deep street set back, and attractive winding brick hardscape, the drive by curb vibe is quiet serenity.

Curzon

(more…)

Meadowbrook Hills

The listing describes 5909 Monterrey Lane as a hidden gem — a characterization that perfectly epitomizes the relatively unknown Meadowbrook Hills addition in general.

Not that Meadowbrook Hills is a new neighborhood. Developed in 1951, it is embellished with large trees and midcentury houses on large lots. Located east of town, the addition lies just inside of Loop 820. Established Fort Worthers have looked askance at the location as out of the way and inconvenient but it is nearer to town than many new western additions. And the average per square foot price of about $100 makes the area tempting and is enticing buyers on the hunt for value.

Meadowbrook Hills

(more…)

West 6th Street

Want to downsize without forfeiting style? A great new listing in the heart of the Cultural District at 3759 West 6th Street may be the perfect solution for you.

Attractive hardscape and manicured lawn form the perfect setting for the charming 1,543-square-foot, two-bedroom, two-bath bungalow. The tidy, well-mannered façade however, doesn’t prepare the visitor for the scale and luxury inside.

(more…)

Cardinal Lane

Oakhurst is all about potential. With its proximity to downtown and the Trinity Vision Project, values have nowhere to go but up. It’s been almost exactly one year ago that we visited Oakhurst, and in that period prices have held steady, but there is a catch — houses move quickly here. The Maple Street listing we covered was under contract before we could post. So I jumped on 2107 Cardinal Lane when it came on the market a mere 24 hours ago.

John P. King and Henry King began developing the neighborhood through their Oakhurst Land Company, Inc. in 1923 and their vision remains true today. (more…)