Megan Anderson's wall exploded because of gas seeping into her home from the soil. (Photo: WFAA)

Megan Anderson’s wall exploded because of gas seeping into her home from the soil. (Photo: WFAA)

When you smell gas in your home and report it to Atmos, what’s the first thing they tell you to do?

Get out of the house.

So when Megan Anderson was busy doing the dishes in the kitchen of her Lakewood home on Jan. 5, she didn’t smell the gas that had been filling a wall between her kitchen and her living room. She didn’t know to get out of the house. She didn’t know not to touch the switch on the garbage disposal that ended up igniting the gas and blowing a hole in her wall.

So why didn’t Megan smell the gas? Why didn’t she know to get out?

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6425 Blanch Circle is one of six amazing homes featured in this year's Lakewood Home Festival. (Photos: Jenifer McNeil Baker)

6425 Blanch Circle is one of six amazing homes featured in this year’s Lakewood Home Festival. (Photos: Jenifer McNeil Baker)

The Lakewood Home Festival is one of those home tours you can’t help but look forward to because it always has such a splendid mix of architecture and style. Last year there was a fabulous Hill Country Modern and perhaps one of my favorite Dilbecks, and this year does not disappoint.

Not only do you get a brand new build and a gorgeous remodeled midcentury modern, but you can also walk through a classic English Tudor and a gorgeous brick and stone home that looks like it could be a Hutsell. This year’s Lakewood Home Festival weekend, themed “The Legacy of Lakewood,” is Nov. 14 and 15, with a disco-licious “Friday Night Fever” auction party on Nov. 13. You can also purchase a limited-edition print fromlocal artist Walter Eduardo Soza of SozaDesigns Studios commemorating this year’s tour for just $250.

Jump to find out how to score tickets and to see more photos of the tour homes.

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This gorgeous home sits on a 62 x 179 lot and boasts 4,509 squar

It’s hard to really define a “Dallas” home without thinking about the “structures” erected in the last 20 years, from the top-heavy wood-shingled maisons that look like skinny women with huge top-heavy boobs, to the McMansions and Mediterranean would-be meccas. Certainly the classic Dallas ranch is a home that defines us as much as a Cape Cod defines, well, Cape Cod.

cdhutsell

But nothing brands itself more as a “Dallas home” than 7023 Lakewood Boulevard. Talk about turrets, here is a turret — an original turret. Architect Clifford Dorris Hutsell may have designed this Lakewood home for himself in 1930 (but we think he actually lived in another home), at a cost of $10,000. At the time, it was one of the most expensive residences in Lakewood. In fact, it cost as much if not more than the Grand Dame mansions on Swiss Avenue. Why is this so truly a Dallas home? Because it was designed and lived in by Hutsell, who built 50 houses in Lakewood between 1926 and 1941, including most of the grand showstoppers along Lakewood Boulevard. He is credited with giving the neighborhood its signature quirky, rambling, old-world look. Hutsell was born in Grapevine, but spent some time in California where he became enamored with Spanish Eclectic design. (Later he pounced on Tudor.) He brought that design back to Texas which was, after all, once under the Spanish flag. Thus Spanish Eclectic is as much a part of our Dallas home brand heritage as it is California’s. (more…)

The Lakewood Theater went dark over the weekend as the existing tenants of both the theater space and the adjoining Arcade Bar have moved out. (Photo: Julie Billingsley Geron)

The Lakewood Theater went dark over the weekend as the existing tenants of both the theater space and the adjoining Arcade Bar have moved out. (Photo: Julie Billingsley Geron)

You’ve certainly heard all about the hubbub surrounding the Lakewood Theater and its many proposed tenants and transformations. Most recently, the longtime bar inside the theater, The Balcony Club, was able to renew its lease at the eleventh hour.

But without management at the Lakewood Theater, the trademark tower and marquee have gone dark, much to the dismay of neighbors. It’s a significant part of the neighborhoods identity, and one that nearby residents had been told would be maintained and preserved whatever should happen to the actual theater.

Instead, as reported on the Lakewood, Dallas Facebook page, the marquee is empty and not a single strip of neon in the sign is ablaze.

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