"Island Living" with the City as your Oyster

“Island Living” with the City as your Oyster

Jim Croce sang that “the south side of Chicago is the baddest part of town.” And now, thanks to years of work, Dallas’ South Side district, otherwise known as The Cedars, is the baddest part of Dallas. CandysDirt.com is bringing you the exclusive pre-listing peep at the most unique space in the neighborhood.

Unlike the cardboard streetscape of West Village, The Cedars retains many original structures, dominated by the South Side on Lamar warehouse condo conversion. This gives the area a rough-and-tumble, more organically grown vibe. Sure there are new buildings like The Beat, the first high-rise south of Interstate 30 in memory, but it’s not all there is.

The area was full of warehouses and light industrial along with some ’60s and ’70s satellite corporate offices. The Beat is even across from an aging IBM outpost. Given the unkemptness of the building, one supposes it houses the remaining OS/2 Warp tech support team (brownie points if you get THAT reference! Cheaters gonna cheat.).

The Beat also borders light rail, making commuting to the city core and beyond a breeze. A few second walk to Lamar Street opens up many hip dining and “joint” options (Cedars Social, Poor David’s). For those uncomfortable with hip … well, there’s always “corporate hip” Gilley’s.

Note: Before imbibing in the area, line up a nearby Cowboy Cab or designated driver. There’s a big ol’ calaboose anchoring the area.

NYLO Rooftop Pool for Lounge Chair Lovelies

NYLO Rooftop Pool for Lounge Chair Lovelies

There’s even a neighboring corporate-hip hotel called NYLO (New York London, I believe). Of course, corporate hip is never really hip (there’s a Plano outpost for gosh sakes), but it’s often nice. How corporate? These acronym lovers have a credo summarized by DELIVER – D is for Design, E is for Entertain … (barf). But in addition to the accommodations, hotel bar and restaurant proximity, it’s the rooftop pool that’s the true amenity for The Beat. You see, the tragically hip are often young lovelies who parade around in skimpy swimming costumes. Beer and a well-placed telescope fulfill some Beat owners’ needs on a summer’s afternoon.

Anywhooo …

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Ritz Unit 702 Terrace

Want to share a story about HOA shenanigans, or have a beautiful unit to show off? Jon Anderson wants to hear about it.

We at CandysDirt.com have been set atingle by the comments readers have posted in public and (scandalously!) in private. First of all, I wish to thank all of my readers. This is the first time I’ve had fans that haven’t been attached to the ceiling!

Share the HOA Luvin’

To expand the theme, we’ve created an email address for readers to contact me more directly. If you have a salacious real estate story or tales of HOA tomfoolery, let me know. If you have a positive story to tell, believe it or not, I’m interested in that too! It’s just as valuable and interesting to know who’s doing “it” well. Not to worry, you’ll be kept as anonymous as you want. As Jim Croce sang…”You don’t pull the mask off that old Lone Ranger, and you don’t mess around with… Candy!”

Share Your Crib Shots

Also, you know I’m big on renovations and I’d love to showcase your hard work. This is especially true of the high-rise variety. So send me your before and after pics along with your renovation yarn (or we can have a chat and I’ll take notes). Realtors, got a high-rise dump you’re trying to shift or a mega-renovated listing to crow about? We can talk, or if you’d rather, play show-and-tell. I’m game either way.

Share your story with me by shooting me a note at sharewithjon@candysdirt.com

Preston Tower - Small

Want to renovate an older highrise unit? Planning and lists are your friends, says Jon Anderson.

By Jon Anderson
Special Contributor

Over the past few weeks you’ve read my bias towards buying and rehabilitating older high-rise condos. They’re cheaper, generally larger, and (in voce real estate-o) full of potential. But renovating is a bit of a headache no matter where it’s being done. So once you’ve settled on your location, location, location, it’s time to start planning, planning, planning.

Many of you may be thinking, “Heck, I’m not doing this, it’s my contractor/designer/architect’s problem,” which may be true.  But understanding these things will help you, your design, and securing more accurate quotes.  Many contractors haven’t worked in high-rises and so these nuances will not be discovered until the job is underway, opening you to surprise add-on charges (wallet-based surprises are rarely good).  Ultimately the total costs may not change, but wouldn’t you rather know up front and plan, versus being surprised in the middle?  I thought so.  Read on…

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