The Baldridge House

When a home has its own Wikipedia entry, you know you are in for something special. Our Monday Morning Millionaire is The Baldridge House, a spectacular 1910 Georgian mansion at 5100 Crestline Road.

If only walls could talk.

Fortunately, The Baldridge House has a voice of sorts. It has been designated a Texas Historic Landmark and a City of Fort Worth Landmark. Not only has the house been beautifully preserved and updated, but the history is also intact. So, a lot is known about this Forth Worth showplace and considering my deep fondness for historical homes, I’m tickled pink to share it with you!

The Baldridge House

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Travis Ave.

I must confess to a certain lackadaisical, late-summer lethargy searching for this week’s Fort Worth Friday. Then I found 2832 Travis Avenue in Hemphill Heights and regained my enthusiasm. We’ve been keeping an eye on Hemphill Heights as one of the up-and-coming in-town neighborhoods for some time. “The Heights” is a neighborhood south of Ryan Place, roughly bounded by Hemphill St. and West Berry St. The neighborhood is still a bit rough around the edges, but has a rich stock of  turn-of-the-century, Craftsman-style houses to tempt young, urban pioneers.

Listings in Hemphill Heights are rare. Sales in Hemphill Heights usually happen on the QT, privately, seller to buyer. So 2832 Travis Avenue is truly a find.  And this 1909-built, three-bedroom, three-full-bath house has been thoroughly updated and restored. New roof, new electric, plumbing, HVAC system, new double hung windows — the works.  (more…)

Before I am accused of being lazy, allow me to note that when the first house in the first planned development in Fort Worth — Ryan Place — comes on the market, I can’t not write about it even if it is just down the street from me, on Elizabeth Blvd.

When 1112 Elizabeth Blvd. was built, in 1911, the world was a very different place. My grandfather was living in his city of birth, Vienna, under the rule of  Franz Joseph, the Austro-Hungarian Emperor. It was still the Belle Epoque, with the upheavals of World War I three years in the future. In the photograph above, taken about 1912, the boulevard was already handling motor car traffic but the original hitching post remains in front, just in case. A short 20 minute buggy ride would have taken you into town. Like all of the original dwellings on Elizabeth Boulevard built between 1911 to 1928, 1112 Elizabeth Boulevard was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

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Not for the first time, a traffic detour routed me past a property for sale so appealing that I postponed my planned post in favor of another listing, this time at 2264 Lipscomb, at the edge of Fairmount. Cute it is, with all of the Fairmount charm in spades, but my jaw dropped at the listing price of $499,000. Further investigation, revealed that Lipscomb is a member of a small, but growing club of Fairmount properties priced at or above $500,000. Even a real estate blogger can be caught off guard in the fast moving target of a hot real estate market.

In the 500 club is 2014 Fifth Avenue, under contract and priced at $539,000. David Folsom of the Folsom Team is offering a charming Fairmount bungalow at 1700 Fairmount Avenue for $520,000. Also bumping against the 500 bar is 1626 South Adams Street originally offered for $520,000, now priced at $489,000.  (more…)

Hemphill

Over lunch last week, I discussed my recent post on the premium price of housing stock in Fairmount with Karly Johnston — yes, that Karly Johnston, named by Fort Worth Magazine as one of Fort Worth’s most beautiful women, creator of one of the most followed lifestyle/real estate websites in the city, Selling the Fort, and savvy real estate professional.

“Fairmount has priced itself pretty much out of the starter home category,” I said. “What’s the next coming thing?” I asked.

“I’ve lately been farming Hemphill Heights,” she chirped.

“Farming?”

“Realtor speak for exploring, investigating, developing,” she explained.

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A. Quincy JonesA. Quincy Jones’ architectural masterpiece at 4167 Charron Lane is likely Fort Worth’s most beautiful and storied orphan. Houses by the venerated modernist architect are so sought after in his native Los Angles, that they are snapped up by the rich and famous as soon as they hit the market. Jennifer Aniston paid $22 million for hers. Courtney Cox lives in one. Seasoned star flipper, Ellen Degeneres banked 15 million dollars, selling her A. Quincy Jones-designed house, to Napster founder Sean Parker for a staggering 55 million dollars, after holding it for less than one year .

A. Quincy Jones

Mrs. Alfred Steele (Joan Crawford) in her William Haines decorated Manhattan Apartment. Feud fans will notice her signature plastic slip covers.

Back in Fort Worth, this A. Quincy Jones gem has enjoyed a glamorous past and faced an uncertain future. Built in 1953 by oil man Andrew Fuller, who had ties to Los Angeles, the home once hosted Hollywood luminaries like Jimmy Stewart and Joan Crawford. Joan would have felt perfectly comfortable here with an interior executed by her own designer and friend, Billy Haines, whose career she helped launch. Amon Carter III, son of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram publisher and grandson of the legendary mayor, also lived here.

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2300 Willing

Remember this beauty at 2300 Willing Avenue? What a difference a few months make. Brent Hull, owner of an architectural millwork firm and Boston-trained expert in historic restoration, has worked his magic and brought back to life the nearly 100-year-old residence in historic Ryan Place.

2300 Willing

That effort is now the subject of a popular weekly program on the History Chanel, Lone Star Restoration, which began October 13th. Viewers can get current by watching previous episodes online. The program features Hull’s unique approach to historical renovation and includes other projects, mostly in Fort Worth. His eloquently stated philosophy is  to “quit building crap and build more beautiful things.” Fort Worth and its commitment to preservation comes off in a highly favorable light.

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Elizabeth Blvd.

In the “keeping track of what’s going on in one’s own backyard” file, the recent and rapid sale of 1111 Elizabeth Blvd. has raised some eyebrows. One hundred years old this year, 1111 Elizabeth Blvd. was built for George W. Armstrong, founder and president of Consumers’ Light and Heat Company, which ultimately became Fort Worth Power and Light. From 1935 to 1955, the home served as the parsonage for the First Methodist Episcopal Church. Listed in the National Registry, the 3,869-square-foot, four-bedroom, three-and-one-half-bath house is also a Fort Worth Historical Preservation Award winner.

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