2328 W. Colorado Blvd. Circa 1941

Stevens Park Village may be nestled off-the-beaten-path between Colorado Boulevard and the edge of North Oak Cliff, but the amazing Dallas skyline is in plain sight from hilltops in the hidden neighborhood. That’s one of the many advantages that villagers enjoy.

The location, just a stone’s throw from Interstate 30 and downtown, is another one. Residents have easy access to the central business district, urban sprawl, and all-things Dallas along with the comfort of coming home to a quiet neighborhood with plenty of village feel.

2107 Barberry Drive Circa 1941

Unlike some historic North Oak Cliff neighborhoods that date back to the 19th century, Stevens Park Village is more of a vintage village. While homes on five of its streets were constructed from 1939 to 1941, houses on the remaining three streets are Midcentury architecture straight out of the 1950s.

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Yes, there’s a house behind those overgrown bushes at 1231 Walter Drive. (Photos: Jo England)

On the other side of Fort Worth Avenue, just off of W. Colorado Blvd. is a quiet enclave of 176 homes called Stevens Park Village. The North Oak Cliff neighborhood, first developed by Annie Stevens between 1939 and 1941, feels homey and quaint, full of Austin stone Prairie-style cottages — even a few Dilbecks! – and bungalows with neat lawns and groomed hedges.

The homes are all sturdy, set upon the meandering tree-lined streets of the neighborhood. Though Cliff Manor Apartments, a public housing project, is just down Fort Worth Avenue from Stevens Park Village, there’s not much traffic and very little crime. It’s idyllic and charming with greenbelts and friendly neighbors.

But there’s one home that didn’t look tidy or loved, with overgrown hedges and peeling paint masking the rotted window frames. That’s the home that Donovan Westover fell in love with.

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A welding torch caused a fire at the Lofts at Sylvan|Thirty, causing fire, water, and smoke damage at an unoccupied portion of the development.

A welding torch caused a fire at the Lofts at Sylvan|Thirty, causing fire, water, and smoke damage at an unoccupied portion of the development.

Cooper Smith Koch, a spokesman for Sylvan|Thirty, said that the small fire in the unoccupied portion of the loft development within the mixed-use development at Sylvan and Fort Worth avenues was extinguished, causing some fire, smoke, and water damage to the still under-construction building. According to DallasNews.com, it was a four-alarm blaze at the $50 million development in West Dallas.

“Fire was extinguished within about half an hour. No one was injured. No residents, who live on the far north end of the lofts, were affected,” he said via Facebook. “Cox Farms Market remained open and construction continued on the other areas.”

This is the second time a fire has damaged a building at Sylvan|Thirty, with the first gutting a retail area slated to house a yoga studio and restaurant.

lofts at sylvan thirty rendering

Sylvan|Thirty is the next big thing in West Dallas. It’s a live/work/play new urbanism center that is already drawing some great tenants, including Cox Farms, Teiichi Sakura’s “Ten” ramen restaurant, wine bar and cafe Bottega Italia, plus many more shops and restaurants.

If this sounds like a the spot for you, Sylvan|Thirty is now accepting reservations for their 201 loft-style apartments, which range from studio residences to three-bedroom units.

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The apartments at Sylvan|Thirty are some of the 1,300 projected units that will be built in West Dallas.

The apartments at Sylvan|Thirty are some of the 1,300 projected units that will be built in West Dallas.

Steve Brown’s dissection of the new apartment projects in West Dallas says that this area with incredible views of downtown and the Calatrava bridge will become the next big industrial-to-residential transition in Dallas. But what impact will these 1,300 brand new apartments have on the existing infrastructure? And will this redevelopment become a model for other areas?

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