Dallas rents grew 2.2 percent in 2017, bringing the median two-bedroom rent to $1,100. It’s not just in Dallas proper where rents are on the rise – rents increased in 2017 in all the major Dallas metro cities including Fort Worth (4.3 percent), Arlington (6.6 percent), Plano (2.9 percent), Garland (2.7 percent), and Irving (3.8 percent). There is some relief for Dallas renters — rents in Dallas proper have declined 0.3 percent over the past month, and are down 1.2 percent since their 2017 peak in August.

The Dallas rent declines are part a seasonal trend, with rents falling in 62 of the top 100 U.S. cities during the month of December. Dallas’ rent decreases have been more pronounced than the nationwide trend, due in large part to increases in multifamily stock. The Dallas metro added more new rental stock than any U.S. metro, with 22,851 deliveries in 2017, up from 15,459 in 2016. The new rental stock decreased occupancy rates by 1.8 percent and softened rent growth, helping keep Dallas rent growth below the national and state averages of 2.5 percent and 2.8 percent, respectively.

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renting in dallas

A new report from Apartment List analyzes the top trends in the 2017 rental market and predicts their impacts in 2018. For example, the report highlights the increase in the homeownership rate after a decade of declines, as well as the decrease in the share of rental units considered affordable to the lowest-income renters. Although affordability remains a concern for those renting in Dallas, Dallas rent growth slowed as the metro added more new rental stock than any other U.S. metro. Dallas rents remain slightly lower than the national average, at $1,100 for a two-bedroom apartment, compared to $1,160 nationwide.

The Dallas market added an estimated 22,851 new rental units in 2017, more than Miami, Phoenix, Boston, and San Francisco combined, and nearly 50 percent more than the number of new units added in 2016. While rental units in Dallas remain in high demand, with 2.4 percent year-over-year rent growth, the large increase in supply decreased occupancy rates from 92.3 percent to 91 percent.

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Rents have been on the rise in Dallas, with the median one-bedroom apartment in Dallas proper renting for $890 a month. Throughout the Dallas area, some suburbs still offer lower prices compared to Dallas, while others are considerably more expensive.

To give renters an idea of how far their rent check will go, we’re highlighting properties at the Dallas median price in Dallas proper, as well as in 10 surrounding cities. From one-bedrooms in Frisco and Carrollton to two-bedrooms in Fort Worth and Garland, there are plenty of great rentals in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro for around $890 a month.

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DFW rent prices

If it feels like you’re paying a lot for rent, you’re probably right: huge demand for DFW apartments in 2016, coupled with a shortage of supply, has pushed rents and building occupancy to record levels.

DFW rent prices are now averaging almost $1,100 a month, according to MPF Research. Add to that a vacancy rate of under 4 percent, and you’ve got demand at an all-time high. The past year’s demand total for apartments in North Texas jumped to 27,120 units, up sharply from the 2015 volume of about 17,000 units.

Fort Worth ranked sixth in the nation for rent increases in 2016, going up 6.7 percent over the previous year. Dallas was close behind, at number 11, with a 6 percent increase over 2015.

“With out apartment clients, we’re getting a lot of people relocating who are unsure if they want to buy or not,” said David Maez, co-founder of Vivo Realty Group. “I think we going to see competitive rent prices continue, even with the inventory that’s coming up.”

There are now almost 50,000 apartments under construction in North Texas, which is about 9 percent of nation’s building activity. That’s the country’s biggest block of product on the way by a large percentage, according to RealPage. About 29,000 of those apartments scheduled for completion in 2017.

“Dallas-Fort Worth is the country’s top spot for apartment demand by a huge margin, which speaks to the strength of the local job market and household formation pace,” said RealPage chief economist Greg Willett. “There’s a great mix of expansion in both the urban core and the suburbs.”

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