I love this house. 7507 Baxtershire. It takes me back ever so far to my childhood, when I spent my summers frolicking with cousins and bicycling by Bruce Goff’s Round House in Aurora, Illinois, on the west side of that town. Yes, THIS house. My cousins lived nearby in a sprawling ’50s ranch:


 

I have been trying to write about this house since I first teased it, but travel, saying goodbye to a beloved pet, and illness precluded. Now, at long last, feast your eyes on the way the current owners, Julie Celum & Guillaume Garrigue, have so beautifully preserved and enhanced this truly iconic and architecturally significant home.

The “Dallas Round House”, as legend has it, was commissioned by a Dallas bon vivante named Eddie Parker. Built in 1961, the home is loaded with 1960s-era materials such as walnut, bamboo, rattan, onyx terrazzo that will knock your socks off, and Hawaiian mahogany. Amenities the last time it was marketed included an indoor pool that has now, thankfully, been taken outside; five bedrooms, four bathrooms, four living areas, and, at one time,  a wisteria-covered steel dome over the circular motor-court. Additional touches include mosaic murals and 24-karat gold-dipped ceramic tiles in the main living area. 

Listing agent Richard Graziano puts it thusly: “The Round House is a true masterpiece and an architecturally significant Mid Century Modernist retreat that was inspired by noted architect, Bruce Goff. This triumph of visionary design was conceived and commissioned by his protege, Eddie Parker. Situated on nearly half an acre, this architectural gem is a sophisticated mix of modern and vintage elements incorporating natural stone, wood, and glass with the extensive use of walnut paneling, onyx terrazzo, Frankoma tiled glass walls, brass inlaid concrete floors and intricate mosaics. This is a rare and limited opportunity to own one of the most iconic and architecturally significant homes in Dallas.”

No kidding. The asking price is $1,725,000 which sounds maybe high, but actually, comes to only $296.70 per square foot. The construction is rock and stone, there is a basement, and the home is now more than 5800 square feet. I am particularly amused by the bunk room, a throwback perhaps to the Atomic Age house bomb drills — “Duck under the desk real quick” — that was a part of my childhood? After all, the home was built in 1962. 

Go ahead, drink these in. Sit on that round bed! We shall return shortly with more on this house, perhaps some design explanation. Ironically, I am once again a not-too-far neighbor of an (almost) Bruce Goff home. 

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First of all, love affair: me and JanMar. Note to husband and world: Do not be surprised if I end up there someday.

Janmar was developed in the late 50’s, early 60’s. Named after the developer’s daughters, Janet and Margaret, you basically have Bluffview east of Hillcrest: hills, water, and Buffalo Creek, which flows to White Rock Lake. It doesn’t feel like any other part of the city. Because of the creeks, the area is loaded with animals such as the usual possums, coyotes, but also great horned owls, great blue herons, hawks, and even a bobcat or two, which very well may have crossed over Hillcrest to our Ricks Circle. Truth be told, bobcats are everywhere in this town from Oak Cliff to Richardson and beyond.

Because of the time period in which it was developed, natural mid-century design abounds here, the most notable of course being Dallas’ Not-Really-By-Bruce-Goff Round House. (Long story.) And because those were the style of homes that were being built when I was growing up, I feel so much at home here. Have I ever told you about Bruce Goff’s REAL “Round House” in Aurora, Illinois? My cousins lived down the street and we rode bikes there all the time. Can you believe it only cost $64,000 to build?:Round House Aurora, Ill.

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Mid Century fanatics out there, can you tell us? I was born in the (ahem, way latter) part of the mid-century and grew up with this stuff and in a tri-level home. But in Chicago, bet your booty we had a garage! Anyone know why most mid centuries in Dallas and Cali come with carports instead of garages? Where did the carport originate anyhow? Speaking of, I drove by the “Bruce Goff House that is not a Bruce Goff House” the other day at 7507 Baxtershire, JanMar, Dallas’s famous round house. They have completely removed the dome in front.

Actually, they did this prior to selling. The home was last listed with David Nichols, Mathews-Nichols at Allie Beth Allman, was last in MLS for $899,000. Ohhh this puppy started out at $1,150,000. The story is that Bruce Goff designed it, but that has never been confirmed. I wonder if taking down the tree trellis helped move it. It closed in February of 2011 and is on DCAD for $651,000, which indicates that the selling price was somewhat lower than $899,000.

The  “Round House” as legend has it was commissioned by a Dallas bon vivante named Eddie Parker. Built in 1961, the home is loaded with 1960s-era materials such as bamboo, rattan, and Hawaiian mahogany. Amenities include an indoor pool, five bedrooms, four bathrooms, four living areas, and, at one time,  a wisteria-covered steel dome over the circular motor-court. Additional touches include mosaic murals and 24-karat gold-dipped ceramic tiles in the main living area. Oh yes, and a carport, which brought me to this conversation!