Providence Village

Much is said about small-town living, and it’s a major reason people move to the suburbs. The upside is you get a lot of house for your money and many are family-friendly communities that make for a nice place to raise kids.

We’ve found a small-town house (that’s anything but small) in Providence Village at 10325 Nantucket Dr. This Colonial-style home has 2,263 square feet on two stories with three bedrooms, two full bathrooms, and a powder room, and it’s under $200K.

Providence Village is a Denton County master-planned community of about 5,750 people and 1,700 homes. It is located along U.S. Highway 380 near FM 2931, about halfway between Frisco and Denton.

The owner of this home, Angela Swenson, says she bought this home because it’s a “real neighborhood—the kind that the rest of America wishes still existed.”

Swenson has an elementary-aged son, and said the community in Providence Village is ideal for him.

“We have blue-ribbon schools, all in walking distance, awesome houses for cheap, and almost every home has kids, so kids are everywhere on their bikes, playing with friends in their yards or at the parks with very little supervision,” Swenson said. “It’s the community for kids and families—we have a waterpark with huge water-slides, seven catch-and-release lakes filled with fish, huge Easter-egg hunts and fireworks displays, and Santa Claus rides down the street in a sleigh giving out inexpensive toys at Christmas.”

This house was built in 2004 and Providence Village is a resort-style community with everything Swenson mentioned, plus four swimming pools, three tennis courts, three dog parks, four baseball fields, four soccer fields, four basketball courts, a clubhouse, community dock and boat ramp for Lake Providence (a 25-acre lake), greenbelt, jogging/bike path, 11 parks, and playgrounds.

Swenson is a Realtor with United Real Estate, and is the listing agent for this house. She put it on the market Feb. 5 for $197,500. HOA fees are $60 per month and cover full use of facilities, maintenance of common areas, and management fees.

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Historic-Downtown-McKinney

His name is Brandon Brooks, he’s 15, and is the astute young man who shot the video of McKinney police breaking up that pool party on Friday that has resulted in the nation’s eyes focused on McKinney, Texas, often voted as the Best Place to Live in America, as perhaps being the the Worst Place to Be If You Are Black and a Teenager.

“The cops showed up and the parents immediately started yelling, ‘you need more cops, there’s too many of them.’ And most of the kids weren’t even involved. It was a fight between a mom and girl, which had nothing to do with all the other kids that she apparently needed more cops for,” Brooks explained.
That’s when Brooks says the officer, reportedly identified as Cpl. Eric Casebolt, arrived on the scene and flipped out. “He trips and drops his flashlight. He’s going crazy, putting people in handcuffs, tackling people, slinging them on the ground.” So, why wasn’t Brooks handcuffed? “I was one of the only white people in the area when that was happening. You can see in part of the video where he tells us to sit down, and he kinda like skips over me and tells all my African-American friends to go sit down.”

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Southlake Champions sportsBy now you’ve probably heard that Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings blamed Dallas’s loss of the big Toyota Headquarters to Plano move on low performing Dallas Public Schools, or DISD.

In an interview on KERA’s Think, Rawlings said Toyota ultimately decided to relocate to Plano because of the schools in Dallas.

“We don’t get Toyota in Dallas because of the school system. We’ve talked to them. They want to be in Plano,” Rawlings said.

Rawlings said it’s difficult to sell a company on moving to Dallas when it has so many low-performing schools that produce few graduates. He said the schools played a role in 7-Eleven deciding to move its headquarters from Dallas to Irving recently.

“They looked at a lot of things — the location, cost of real estate,” Rawlings said about Toyota. “But they want a school … The 7-Eleven CEO said, ‘I need to be where our families are sending their kids to school,’ and they are not sending them to DISD.” (more…)