It was contentious, a lot. In fact, at one point almost anyone remotely affiliated with a Scott Griggs supporter was blocked by mayoral candidate Eric Johnson on social media. But in the end, he not only unblocked everyone, according to his campaign, but he also won a fairly combative race to become Dallas’ next mayor.

Johnson beat Griggs 55 percent to 44 percent.

Click on map to see larger version.

The tone Johnson took Saturday night was much lighter as he spoke to supporters after Griggs conceded. 

After making his way to the stage and hugging his wife, Johnson took a deep breath.

“This is one of those moments that you think you’re prepared for, but you’re just never prepared for something like this,” he said, going on to thank Griggs for his years of service to the city. (more…)

Election

Voters lined up at the Oak Lawn library Election Day, with more than 400 people casting ballots by lunchtime (photo by Bethany Erickson)

Frisco, Richardson and Dallas ISD Pass Property Tax Increases

  • Allred bests Sessions in U.S. Rep. District 32 race
  • All four propositions on the ballot for Dallas ISD passed
  • Johnson beats Rinaldi, Johnson beats Luby Ryan
  • Carolyn King Arnold, Keyaira Saunders headed to a runoff

While Democrats came surprisingly (to many) close to winning statewide seats on Election Day, ultimately candidates came just short of besting the Republican party across the board in statewide races. How close were the races, despite the losses? In 16 years, Democratic candidates in statewide races have received 45 percent of the vote only twice — last night, nine of them did.

“Today is not a bad day,” Mike Collier, Democratic candidate for Lieutenant Governor, said Tuesday night. “We showed Texas that if you campaign on issues that Texans care about, you can have a strong showing in this state.”

But while the “Beto Effect” may not have bestowed a win on its namesake, it was still impacting races, with the El Paso congressman’s get out the vote effort being attributed to down-ballot flips in several congressional, state, and local races.

After record early voting, Election Day polling locations varied from “ghost towns,” as one poll greeter said, to steadily busy. Turnout increased as schools let out, and as people got off work, volunteers said.

Election Day

After a bit of turmoil during early voting, the Lakeside Activity Center in Mesquite was actually calm and congenial Election Day.

Measures for 13-cent Tax Ratification Elections passed in both Richardson ISD and Dallas ISD. Frisco ISD voters approved a 13-cent tax swap that will move 13 cents from the debt service column to the maintenance and operations column.   (more…)

NobodyNow I know you’re probably already squawking — I can hear it from here — about this “Nobody” business in this headline. “NOBODY? Record turnout, lady, in early voting — how is that NOBODY votes?”

But hear me out.

If nobody votes, then Nobody will win. And that’s not just brain-breaking hyperbole that the grammarian in me is grappling with. Cartographers Philip Kearney and Jim Herries used Census data to plot nonvoters, and made a really not-ground-breaking-at-all discovery: Nobody (if Nobody was a candidate) would’ve beaten the pants off Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in the last election.

In fact, Nobody would’ve won 445 electoral votes to Trump’s 21 and Clinton’s 72.

To make the editor in me happy, though, can we just say that when people don’t vote, Nobody the Candidate wins?

Now yes, early voting turnout statewide has been incredible. And seriously, even though the lines were long occasionally, voting early is quite possibly the easiest way we currently have available to vote — you can go anywhere in the county, line up, cast your ballot, and walk back out, possibly with a cool new sticker.

In the 30 counties in Texas that contain the bulk of the state’s registered voters, turnout for early voting exceeded the election turnout for the entire 2014 midterm election, data compiled by the Texas Tribune showed.

In Dallas County, there are 1,335,313 registered voters this election, and 529,521 cast their votes early, or 39 percent, compared to 214,312 in 2014. In Tarrant County, 465,817 of the county’s 1,122,597 registered voters (or 41.5 percent) voted early. In Collin County, almost half (49.4 percent) of the county’s 579,893 registered voters voted early. Forty-six percent of Denton County’s 497,490 voters have already cast ballots. (more…)

Richardson ISD announced Thursday that security concerns have motivated a calendar change this year one that so far other local districts have not adopted.

It’s not unusual for schools to serve as polling locations on Election Day. But RISD officials said that security risks associated with the practice have led them to make Nov. 6 a student holiday and staff development day.

“The change is being made as a precaution due to the thousands of unregistered visitors who gain access to RISD schools serving as voting locations on Election Day,” the district said in an announcement. “Because staff members and some daytime care students will still be in schools on Nov. 6, RISD will continue to take additional safety precautions to isolate voting areas from the rest of the campus and monitor visitors.” (more…)