GD HoY 1

Each year the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) evaluates significant new single-family residential builds across the UK. They come up with a short-list that’s whittled down to a handful of finalists before naming their House of the Year. For UK architects, it’s the Academy Awards of architecture.

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architect alan ricks

GHESKIO Cholera Treatment Center, designed by architect Alan Ricks. Photo: Iwan Baan

The next Dallas Architecture Forum event will feature an evening with Alan Ricks, an architect and urban strategist whose work focuses on design innovation and health infrastructure development, using design to advance a more equitable world.

Alan Ricks

Alan Ricks

Ricks is the Chief Operating Officer and Co-Founder of MASS Design Group in Boston, an impact-driven architecture and design firm focused on community design for underserved populations around the world. The firm began with the design and construction of the critically acclaimed Butaro Hospital in Rwanda and has since expanded to twelve countries on three continents.

Ricks will speak Thursday, Dec. 10, at Magnolia Theatre in West Village. There is a reception at 6:15 p.m., followed by his lecture at 7 p.m.

The projects of MASS Design Group span research, policy, education, and strategic planning that provide infrastructure, buildings, and the human and physical systems necessary for growth, dignity, and well-being. Their bottom line is designing and constructing better buildings,
and empowering the people who build them and using good design to save and improve lives around the world.

“I believe architecture improves our lives and we can design the process to create social value,” Ricks said. “We can demand that our built environment makes a radically positive impact in society.”

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Dallas Architecture Forum

The William J. Clinton Presidential Center, designed by architect Kevin McClurkan and his team at Ennead Architects in New York City. Photo: Timothy Hursley

Designing a presidential library is a notable honor in the architecture world. The next lecture of the season for the Dallas Architecture Forum will feature outstanding architect Kevin McClurkan, AIA, Management Partner of Ennead Architects of New York City. McClurkan is the architect behind the William J. Clinton Presidential Center in Little Rock, Ark.

Kevin McClurkan, AIA

Kevin McClurkan, AIA

McClurkan is known for myriad other notable projects, too, including the Newseum adjacent to the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., and The Standard hotel on the High Line Park in New York City.

He will speak on Tuesday, Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. in the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art.

“Kevin McClurkan’s projects include some of the most unique buildings in the United States—he is one of the very few architects who has designed a United States presidential library,” said Nate Eudaly, the Forum’s Executive Director. “Our members and the Dallas community will be fortunate to learn about these and other important buildings that Kevin McClurkan and his team at Ennead have created.”

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Wallflower art installation by Randy Brown Architects. Photo: Bryce Bridges

Wallflower art installation by Randy Brown Architects. Photo: Bryce Bridges

Architect Randy Brown, FAIA, is kicking off the 2015-16 lecture season for the Dallas Architecture Forum.

“Since the Dallas Architecture Forum has members and guests who are not only architects and related professionals, but also the general public, I will overview some of the major projects my firm has done and how they impact and influence the everyday lives of those who live and work in them,” Brown said. “Some of the things I will talk about are how my work is influenced by geography and climate where the projects are located. I will discuss the importance of sustainable design and how I use natural materials in my projects.”

He will be presenting his projects in the larger context of architecture, design, and the environment.

Brown, founder of Omaha-based Randy Brown Architects, will be speaking on Wednesday, Oct. 21, at 7 p.m. at the Magnolia Theatre in the West Village. There is a complimentary reception at 6:15 p.m.

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Staff invite_10-12 Short

It’s that time again … time for our next Candy’s Dirt Staff Meeting. Next week, we’ll leave the high-rises behind to celebrate a 1.17 acre estate at 6626 Talmadge Lane being marketed by Tim Schutze of Allie Beth Allman for $6.95 million. I call it an estate because “home” and even “residence” don’t exactly cover fourteen-thousand-ish square feet built by premier Dallas builder Mark Molthan.

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I toured the estate yesterday and have to say driving up, it’s definitely one of those estates you drive by wishing you had X-ray vision to see what’s on the inside. Luckily, Tim had the keys!

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Among the winners of this year’s AIA Dallas Built Design Awards is one structure that stands out: An incredible forest residence on Cedar Creek Reservoir by Wernerfield. And it has such a wonderful history, too.

This residence is located on a beautiful wooded site on Cedar Creek Reservoir and is intended to provide an artful and low maintenance retreat that would blend in with the site. A slender floor plan design allowed for the buildings to be woven carefully through the dense forest of pine trees that were planted by the owner on the property as a child.

Of course, I love the other projects, which include some buildings that are well on their way to becoming Dallas landmarks, including the new Parkland Hospital designed by HDR + Corgan and the Richards Group building from Perkins + Will.

Jump to see more photos of the CCR1 Residence, which looks like something cut out of the side of a cliff and set among a forest like a stone washed up from a river.

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Buzzworks is proposing a live/work space made entirely out of shipping containers.

Buzzworks is proposing a live/work space made entirely out of shipping containers.

Well, you know what they say about opinions …

… not everyone agrees with yours, amiright? That’s the message I got from a few readers who disagreed with my column’s assertion that shipping containers are over like shell art.

While a some were brief, there were some impassioned pleas for reason.

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I know that not everyone is going to agree with me, but I’ve been thinking about this ever since PV14 was built: Shipping containers as housing is over.

So over.

When Michael Gooden was hoisting the long metal boxes in the air that would make up his shipping container project in Old Lake Highlands that overlooks White Rock Lake, I had to wonder: Why are we using metal boxes to build things in Texas? Have you ever been inside a storage unit without climate control in summer here? It’s the equivalent of being baked alive. Heck, if you want to sweat it out, go to King Spa. But a corrugated metal home in an area where you’re roasting on 100-degree days throughout the summer? No thanks. And consider that, if you’re just building a room without modifying the container size, it’s only 7 feet wide, which is hardly a good size for a human-scaled space.

And yet, Zad Roumaya wants to build an apartment development in the Cedars that will be made of shipping containers. He says he’ll call the concept, should it get off the ground, ModPod. But how much sense does it make to assemble all these boxes to build a structure that costs hundreds of dollars to retrofit for our climate?

I was glad to see that my misgivings were validated by someone far more qualified: San Francisco-based OpenScope principle Mark Hogan. Hogan, an architect who has even done a shipping container project has much more to say on the matter.

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